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Updated: 26 min 46 sec ago

Today is Friday the 15th of February, 2019

Fri, 02/15/2019 - 07:55

We close out this week with just two pieces…

Have a safe weekend!

Tom

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Fire Caused By Vape Pen Battery Delays Houston-Bound Flight From LaGuardia

Fri, 02/15/2019 - 07:52

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Scary moments on a plane about to leave New York were caught on camera after a fire broke out in an overhead bin. 

The Delta flight from LaGuardia to Houston was delayed Wednesday afternoon after flames shot out of the overhead storage bin and sent smoke billowing through the cabin.

“You could tell it was a very strong smell, smelled like a campfire at first,” passenger Rex Sakamoto told CBS2. “Once I realized and someone yelled fire, it was startling like wow, I need to get off this plane right now.”

The East Harlem resident says sparks started to fly above the seats in row 10 while passengers were still boarding. Video from the plane shows a flight attendant using a fire extinguisher before travelers were told to get off the plane.

CBS2 Facetimed with the “NowThis” news producer as he and dozens of others waited at the gate for their new flight to Texas.

“It was just like a ripple effect of this chaos,” he said.

The mayhem was caused by a vape pen that started smoldering inside a bag after the device’s battery pack overheated. An FAA report from August 2018 shows there have been at least 225 cases of smoke, fire, overheating or explosion involving lithium ion batteries or other unknown types of batteries on plans and in airports since 1991.

Some of the electronics that seem to be the most common culprits for small fires on planes are things we need to stay connected while we travel, like laptops and cell phones. In October 2016, a smokey Samsung smartphone cause the evacuation of a Southwest Airlines flight.

The FAA report also mentioned battery chargers, cameras, noise canceling headphones, flashlights, even batter-heated socks.

“I’m just so glad it happened on the ground and not in the air,” Sakamoto said of the silver lining to the orange glow that delayed his trip.

Fire Caused By Vape Pen Battery Delays Houston-Bound Flight From LaGuardia

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Today in History

Fri, 02/15/2019 - 07:43

58 Years ago today: On 15 February 1961 a Sabena Boeing 707 lost control and crashed on approach to Brussels, Belgium, killing all 72 occupants and one on the ground.

Date: Wednesday 15 February 1961 Time: 10:05 Type: Boeing 707-329 Operator: Sabena Registration: OO-SJB C/n / msn: 17624/92 First flight: 1959 Total airframe hrs: 3038 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT4A Crew: Fatalities: 11 / Occupants: 11 Passengers: Fatalities: 61 / Occupants: 61 Total: Fatalities: 72 / Occupants: 72 Ground casualties: Fatalities: 1 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 3 km (1.9 mls) NE of Brussel-Zaventem Airport (BRU) (   Belgium) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: New York-Idlewild International Airport, NY (IDL/KIDL), United States of America Destination airport: Brussel-Zaventem Airport (BRU/EBBR), Belgium Flightnumber: SN548

Narrative:
Sabena flight SN548 was a transatlantic service from New York to Brussels. The Boeing 707 was on a long approach to runway 20 when, near the runway threshold and at a height of 900 feet, power was increased and the gear retracted. The plane made three 360 degrees turns to the left and climbed to 1500 feet. During these turns the bank angle increased more and more until the aircraft was in a near vertical bank. The wings then leveled, followed by an abrupt pitch up. The 707 lost speed, started to spiral rapidly towards the ground nose down, crashed and caught fire.

Probable Cause

PROBABLE CAUSE: “Having carried out all possible reasonable investigations, the Commission concluded that the cause of the accident had to be looked for in the material failure of the flying controls.
However, while it was possible to advance certain hypotheses regarding the possible causes, they could not be considered entirely satisfactory. Only the material failure of two systems could lead to a complete explanation, but left the way open to an arbitrary choice because there was not sufficient evidence to corroborate it.”
The FAA commented that the most plausible hypothesis was a malfunction of the stabilizer adjusting mechanism permitting the stabilizer to run to the 10.5deg nose-up position.

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Today is Thursday the 14th of February, 2019

Thu, 02/14/2019 - 09:46

Here are the stories for today…

Take a good look at the Moberly Airport fatality story, wear your PPE…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Extreme turbulence made plane nosedive twice and sent drink carts flying injuring five

Thu, 02/14/2019 - 09:42

By Richard Hartley-Parkinson

Five people were injured when their aeroplane suffered such severe turbulence it was forced to make an emergency landing. They were on a flight from Santa Ana, California, to Seattle, Washington, when things started getting bumpy at 34,000ft. A passenger on board said that the plane nosedived twice and pictures from the cabin show the chaotic aftermath.

Three people had to be taken to hospital when they landed at Reno-Tahoe International Airport, Nevada, to be treated for their injuries on the Delta Airlines flight 5763. The cabin crew have been praised for their handling of the situation as video emerged of people looking dazed by what had happened. One woman had bruising to her elbow and had a napkin pressed against her head, which was bleeding. Passenger Dave Macias said: I’ve been on a lot of flights over the last year and a half and this was by far the wildest flight I’ve ever been on. ‘Thanks @delta and @#renoairport for making the best out of a horrible situation and getting us squared away as quick as possible.’

Passengers were given pizza and drinks while they waited for another flight. Reno-Tahoe spokesman Brian Kulpin said: ‘There were people who were shaken up, understandably.’ The airline said: ‘We apologize for this experience as we get customers to Seattle’.

https://metro.co.uk/2019/02/14/extreme-turbulence-made-plane-nosedive-twice-sent-drink-carts-flying-injuring-five-8617232/

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Strong winds likely a factor as plane hits jet bridge at Buffalo airport

Thu, 02/14/2019 - 09:38

By Keith McShea

No one was injured when a plane departing from Buffalo Niagara International Airport struck a jet bridge Wednesday morning, according to the Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority.

An NFTA official said “it appears the strong winds were a factor.”

59 mph wind was recorded early this morning at the airport.

Officials said United flight No. 1442 was set for departure, and while pushing out, the nose of the plane hit jet bridge No. 9. The jet bridge, or jetway, is the walkway that connects the terminal with airplanes. Officials said there were 158 on board with no injuries.

An investigation is ongoing, officials said.

https://buffalonews.com/2019/02/13/strong-winds-likely-a-factor-as-plane-hits-jet-bridge-at-buffalo-airport/

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St. Louis man exposed to carbon monoxide at Moberly airport dies

Thu, 02/14/2019 - 09:36

By: Zachary Farwell

MOBERLY, Mo. – The Randolph County Coroner confirmed Wednesday morning that a man who was exposed to carbon monoxide at the airport in Moberly has died.

Coroner Don Barrett said his office was informed that Arron J. Herring, 29, of St. Louis, died at a hospital in Columbia on Saturday.

According to Barrett, the cause of death has been ruled as carbon monoxide poisoning.

Two other men found unresponsive inside a hangar at Omar R. Bradley Regional Airport were treated and released from the hospital.

A Moberly firefighter was also released after being treated for carbon monoxide exposure.

Investigators said last week the source of the carbon monoxide was a malfunctioning heater.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is investigating the incident.

https://www.abc17news.com/news/st-louis-man-exposed-to-carbon-monoxide-at-moberly-airport-dies/1017055343

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Today in History

Thu, 02/14/2019 - 09:34

29 Years ago today: On 14 February 1990 an Indian Airlines Airbus 320 crashed while approaching Bangalore, India, killing 92 out of 146 occupants.

Date: Wednesday 14 February 1990 Time: 13:03 Type: Airbus A320-231 Operator: Indian Airlines Registration: VT-EPN C/n / msn: 079 First flight: 1989 Engines:IAE V2500-A1 Crew: Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 88 / Occupants: 139 Total: Fatalities: 92 / Occupants: 146 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 0,7 km (0.4 mls) W of Bangalore-Hindustan Airport (BLR) (   India) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Mumbai (Bombay) Airport (BOM/VABB), India Destination airport: Bangalore-Hindustan Airport (BLR/VOBG), India Flightnumber: 605

Narrative:
Flight IC605 took off from Mumbai (Bombay) at 11:58 for a flight to Bangalore (BLR). At 12:25 Bangalore approach was contacted and prevailing weather at Bangalore was passed on to the crew (wind variable 5 knots, visibility 10 km, clouds 2 octa 2000 feet, temp 27deg, QNH 1018). At 12:44 the aircraft was cleared to descend to FL110. Reaching FL110, vectors were given for a visual runway 09 approach. On final approach, the aircraft descended well below the normal approach profile and kept descending until it struck the boundaries of the Karnataka Golf Club (2300 feet short of the runway and 200 feet right of the extended centerline. The aircraft rolled for 80 feet and lifted off again for about 230 feet and came down again on the 17th green of the golf course. The landing gear wheels dug into the ground and the aircraft impacted a 12 feet high embankment, causing the gears and engines to be sheared off. The aircraft continued over the embankment and came to rest in a grassy, marshy and rocky area

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “Failure of the pilots to realize the gravity of the situation and respond immediately towards proper action of moving the throttles, even after the radio altitude call-outs of “Four hundred”, “Three hundred” and “Two hundred” feet, in spite of knowing that the plane was in idle/open descent mode. However, identification of the cause for the engagement of idle/open descent mode in short final approach during the crucial period of the flight is not possible.”

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Today is Wednesday the 13th of February, 2019

Wed, 02/13/2019 - 08:37

Here are the stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Plane Crashes in Makutano Forest in Londiani, Kericho

Wed, 02/13/2019 - 08:34

By MICHAEL MUSYOKA

A plane, on Wednesday, crashed in Makutano Forest in Londiani, Kericho County killing five people on board 

Confirming the incident, Rift Valley Police Commander Edward Mwamburi disclosed that police and rescue teams were headed to the scene. 

First responders reported that five people were in the light aircraft that was flying from Maasai Mara Game Reserve en route to Lowdar.

Airwing Commander Rodgers Mbithi told journalists that all the occupants had succumbed in the crash.

The Cessna plane reportedly developed a mechanical problem before hitting a tree.

The incident comes days after two planes collided at JKIA during maintenance.

Luckily, no injuries were reported during the incident.

Photos shared on social media showed one aircraft with a damaged nose while the other had a damaged wing.

During the crash in Londiani, residents gathered at the scene to try to save the injured, but they weren’t successful.

https://www.kenyans.co.ke/news/36893-planes-crashes-makutano-forest-kericho

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KLM aircraft slightly damaged by collision during taxiing

Wed, 02/13/2019 - 08:30

Two KLM aircraft hit each other on Wednesday morning while taxiing, confirms a Schiphol spokesman. 

The devices are slightly damaged. According to the spokesman no people were injured. The KLM spokeswoman  says that passengers have not been in danger for a moment.

Probably the collision does not lead to delays at the airport “The aircraft have already been towed away.”

Both aircraft were destined for the United States. One of the aircraft was on its way to Atlanta and the other was to leave for Los Angeles.

“We will think about the cause later, now it is only important to put the passengers on another plane as quickly as possible,” continued the KLM spokesman. “The aircraft are carefully checked and therefore remain on the ground for the time being.”

“For the people who were on their way to Atlanta, this has already happened, and we are still working to help the people who are going to Los Angeles.”

https://www.nu.nl/binnenland/5740272/klm-toestellen-licht-beschadigd-door-botsing-tijdens-het-taxien.html?redirect=1

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NTSB: ‘Sharp left turn’ before fatal Ohio helicopter crash

Wed, 02/13/2019 - 08:25

BY ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS, OHIO

An Ohio medical helicopter on its way to pick up a hospital patient made “a sharp left turn” before a crash that killed three people including the pilot last month, according to a preliminary federal report.

The report released Monday by the National Transportation Safety Board said the Survival Flight helicopter, a Bell 407, made a turn to the right about 15 minutes after takeoff in suburban Columbus Jan. 29, followed by the left turn.

A Survival Flight operations control specialist observed the movements on flight tracking software, the report said.

The report said a “no-tracking alarm” activated after the left turn.

After the company lost track of the helicopter about 7:20 a.m., authorities located the wreckage nearly three hours later in rugged terrain in an area connected only by logging trails near the community of Zaleski, about 75 miles (121 kilometers) southeast of Columbus. Debris was scattered downslope over about 600 feet (183 meters).

The first rescuers on the scene detected a strong smell of fuel, the NTSB report said.

All three crew members were from Ohio: pilot Jennifer Topper, 34, of Sunbury and flight nurses Bradley Haynes, 48, of London and Rachel Cunningham, 33, of Galloway.

Two other air-medical companies opted not to accept the assignment over concerns about the weather that day.

Andy Arthurs, a Survival Flight vice president, declined comment while the investigation continues.

A follow-up report in six to nine months will include more details about the crash, with a final report several months after that to include the likely cause, NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said Tuesday.

https://www.tri-cityherald.com/news/business/technology/article226158810.html

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Today in History

Wed, 02/13/2019 - 08:23

64 Years ago today: On 13 February 1955 a Sabena Douglas DC-6 flew into a hill on a flight to Rome, Italy, killing all 29 occupants.

Date: Sunday 13 February 1955 Time: 19:53 Type: Douglas DC-6 Operator: Sabena Registration: OO-SDB C/n / msn: 43063/60 First flight: 1947 Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 8 Passengers: Fatalities: 21 / Occupants: 21 Total: Fatalities: 29 / Occupants: 29 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Monte Terminillo (   Italy) Crash site elevation: 1700 m (5577 feet) amsl Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Brussel-Haren Airport, Belgium Destination airport: Roma-Ciampino Airport (CIA/LIRA), Italy Flightnumber: 503

Narrative:
The Sabena DC-6 departed Brussels (BRU), Belgium at 17:17 on a scheduled flight to Rome-Ciampino (Italy), Kano (Nigeria) and Léopoldville (now Kinshasa, D.R.Congo).
Contact with Ciampino ACC was initiated according to plan at 19:29 , at which time the aircraft had passed over Florence at 17500 feet. At 19:48 Ciampino control asked the aircraft whether it had passed over Viterbo. Instead of answering this question directly, the crew inquired whether the Viterbo NDB was on full power. The controller replied that another aircraft had overflown the Viterbo NDB shortly before and had found it to be operating properly.
At 19:51 GMT the aircraft stated that it had passed over Viterbo NDB one minute previously and requested clearance to descend to 5500 feet ; this was granted . One minute later it inquired whether the Ciampino ILS were operating and received an affirmative reply. At 19:53, OO-SDB called Rome control but communication was suddenly cut off.
The airplane hit the slope of the Costone dell’Acquasanta at a height of 1700 metres

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The navigation was conducted without making use of all such radio aids as would have permitted checking, and consequently correcting the drift of the aircraft whereas the crew actually remained unaware of the drift. In fact, instead of making sure they were over the Viterbo beacon, they merely held that conviction, and therefore the approach procedure to the Rome terminal area (which prescribes overflight of the Viterbo beacon) was erroneously applied. The following contributing causes may be taken into consideration, 1) crosswind to the route stronger than forecast; 2) weather conditions particularly unfavourable to radio reception in MF.”

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Today is Tuesday the 12th of February, 2019

Tue, 02/12/2019 - 08:00

Here are the stories for today…

Please take a minute of your time and read the piece from Chief Goldfeders “The Secret List” and help by taking the “NFPA Standard 1851” survey.

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Good Samaritans frantically try to rescue driver trapped in a truck after a helicopter crashes into the vehicle and kills a Brazilian TV anchor and the pilot

Tue, 02/12/2019 - 07:54
  • Award-winning journalist, Ricardo Boechat, was killed after the helicopter he was travelling in crashed onto a truck on a highway in Sao Paulo on Monday
  • Cell phone videos captured the moment two people came to the aid of the trapped truck driver and worked to free him
  • Boechat was a TV anchor with Brazilian station TV Band and headed its nightly news program
  • The 66-year-old won three Esso Prizes, Brazil’s most prestigious journalism award
  • Boechat is survived by his wife, Veruska, and six children

By ASSOCIATED PRESS and ADRY TORRES FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

Good Samaritans were caught on camera rushing to the aid of a truck driver moments after a helicopter carrying an award-winning Brazilian television anchor crashed into a tractor-trailer on a busy highway, instantly killing the newsman. 

Ricardo Boechat, 66, was returning from a university in the city of Campinas when his helicopter crashed onto a truck on the left lane of Anhanguera Highway in northwestern Sao Paulo on Monday.

Police also confirmed that the pilot died.

Alarming cell phone images capture the moment a woman and man are scrambling to clear the debris from wrecked truck.

The woman attempts to pry the door open but she gives up after noticing it’s jammed. The driver was later freed.

The helicopter, a PT-HPG model from 1975, crushed the big rig’s front hood and shattered its windshield.

The chopper’s tail was spotted on the ground near the trailer’s right side.

The rest of the helicopter was engulfed in flames on the shoulder lane and on the highway median.

Boechat who was born in Argentina while his father was serving a diplomatic mission in the neighboring Brazil later became a news star in Brazil.

The veteran journalist anchored TV Band’s main nightly news, as well as hosting a radio program and writing a column for IstoE magazine.

The station cut into its scheduled programming to announce his death at 1.51pm.

Boechat was also a frequent mediator of presidential debates for his network.

During his distinguished career, Boechat won three Esso Award, Brazil’s most prestigious journalism prize, for his reports on corruption. He was noted for poking fun at politicians across the political spectrum.

Police Captain Augusto Paiva said the truck driver suffered only minor injuries.

‘The helicopter tried to land in an access road close to a toll station. But then the truck came and they crashed. The fire occurred because of the collision,’ Paiva said.

President Jair Bolsonaro, a frequent target of Boechat’s criticism, expressed his condolences on Twitter.

Boechat is survived by his wife, Veruska, and six children.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6692167/Brazilian-TV-anchor-dies-helicopter-crash.html

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Jet slides off runway at Richmond airport; ends up in ditch near highway

Tue, 02/12/2019 - 07:50

WAYNE COUNTY — A jet slid off the end of the runway while landing at Richmond Municipal Airport off Indiana route 227 this morning, according to state police. 

No one was injured in the incident, which was still being investigated around 10:40 a.m.

The road was reopened by 4:30 p.m.

According to FlightAware, the plane was scheduled to arrive at Richmond Municipal Airport from Waukesha County in Wisconsin around 10:05 a.m.

The plane ended up coming to a stop in a ditch on Indiana route 227.

The aircraft is registered to Premier Beechcraft LLC.

https://www.whio.com/news/local/plane-crash-under-investigation-south-richmond-wayne-county/DAeaQD6sDX9XNxTWMmiCyN/

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Firefighter decon challenges: knowledge versus practice

Tue, 02/12/2019 - 07:48

Understanding firefighter beliefs and behaviors related to cleaning and decontaminating bunker gear after a fire is an essential first step in devising an effective health intervention to reduce risks.

Firefighters face substantial risks of exposure to carcinogens and other toxins. These exposure risks result most often from dermal absorption during a fire or inhalation of off-gassing particles (volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) from contaminated bunker gear during removal.

A recent study1 examined firefighter attitudes, norms and perceived barriers to field decontamination processes. Data for the study was collected from a survey of 482 firefighters from four South Florida fire departments.

Study results

  • Firefighter attitudes were overwhelmingly favorable towards cleaning gear. However, actual firefighter decontamination and cleaning behaviors did not follow at the same level. We also see this divergence of attitude and behavior in other areas of health concern, such as public attitudes and behaviors related to organ donation.
  • Firefighters only showered about 64 percent of the time within an hour. Ten percent reported they never or only rarely showered immediately after a fire.
  • Other recommended decontamination steps occurred only “sometimes” or even less frequently.
  • Routine cleaning of bunker gear back at the station should be a standard practice but only 15 percent of firefighters reported doing this regularly.
  • Hood swap and field decontamination practices were still considered a “new” practice, with barriers still blocking wide adoption.
  • Firefighters reported high levels of concern about the time it took to clean gear and the negative impact of having wet gear on job performance.
  • Peer-influence may still also adversely impact individual post-fire cleaning behavior.

Key takeaway

Firefighters fully recognize the benefits of post-fire cleaning and decontamination. The challenge, though, lies in getting them to act on this knowledge. A successful behavioral health intervention for firefighter decontamination needs to overcome two major potential challenges.

  1. The perceived norm among a group of peers.
  2. The perceived job or organizational barriers that inhibit the adoption of acknowledged decontamination practices.

In a future article, we’ll look at a study that addressed these challenges with messaging based on behavioral change theory.

1Harrison, T.R., Wendorf Muhamad, J. Yang, F., Morgan, S.E., & Talavera, E., Caban-Martinez, A., & Kobetz, N. (2018). Firefighter attitudes, norms, beliefs, barriers, and behaviors toward post-fire decontamination processes in an era of increased cancer risk. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 15(4), 279-284. DOI: 10.1080/15459624.2017.1416389

https://www.usfa.fema.gov/current_events/020719.html

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Your Bunker Gear & The NFPA (The Secret List)

Tue, 02/12/2019 - 07:43

All,

NFPA sometimes reminds me of the the Wizard of Oz-people think they know about it-sorta-kinda-but few understand what goes on behind the curtain. And quite frankly, while nearly everything we do in the fire service is covered by an NFPA standard, sometimes heads are left scratching.

One of the recent “hot button” items is the NFPA Standard 1851: your bunker gear-from helmet to coat to gloves to pants to boots….the stuff we wear. 

So how serious are we about this standard? 

Do “all” FD’s actually follow the standard?

Is your department compliant?

Does It Matter?

Headscratch. 

So…take literally ONE MINUTE and provide your input:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWB2FXF

And as far as what’s going on behind the curtain, the curtain is easily pulled back for every NFPA standard-we just have to look:

https://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/all-codes-and-standards/list-of-codes-and-standards/detail?code=1851

Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On.

BillyG

The Secret List 2/11/2019-0920 Hours

www.FireFighterCloseCalls;com

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Today in History

Tue, 02/12/2019 - 07:40

56 Years ago today: On 12 February 1963 a Northwest Orient Boeing 720 crashed out of control into the Everglades, FL, killing all 43 occupants.

Date: Tuesday 12 February 1963 Time: 13:50 Type: Boeing 720-051B Operator: Northwest Orient Airlines Registration: N724US C/n / msn: 18354/224 First flight: 1962-04-17 (10 months) Total airframe hrs: 4685 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT3D-1 Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 8 Passengers: Fatalities: 35 / Occupants: 35 Total: Fatalities: 43 / Occupants: 43 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Everglades, FL (   United States of America) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Miami International Airport, FL (MIA/KMIA), United States of America Destination airport: Chicago-O’Hare International Airport, IL (ORD/KORD), United States of America Flightnumber: 705

Narrative:
Northwest Flight 705 was a scheduled flight from Miami, FL (MIA) to Portland, OR (PDX) with intermediate stops at Chicago, IL (ORD), Spokane, WA (GEG) and Seattle, WA (SEA).
Prior to departing the ramp at 13:25, the crew asked the ground controller about the departure routes being utilized, and he replied that most flights were departing “… either through a southwest climb or a southeast climb and then back over the top of it… “. The flight departed Miami with an Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) clearance at 13:35. A left turn was made after takeoff from runway 27L and circuitous routing was utilized, in conjunction with radar vectors from Miami Departure Control, to avoid areas of anticipated turbulence associated with thunderstorm activity. A similar departure pattern had been previously flown by another flight.
Subsequently, while maintaining 5,000 feet and a heading of 300 degrees, Flight 705 requested clearance to climb to a higher altitude. Following a discussion between the flight and the radar departure controller about the storm activity, and while clearance to climb was being coordinated with the Miami Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC), the flight advised “Ah-h we’re in the clear now. We can see it out ahead … looks pretty bad.” At 13:43, Flight 705 was cleared to climb to FL250. They responded, “OK ahhh, we’ll make a left turn about thirty degrees here and climb…” The controller asked if 270 degrees was their selected climbout heading, and they replied that this would take them “… out in the open again…” Accordingly, clearance was granted. Following some discussion about the severity of the turbulence, which was described as moderate to heavy, the flight advised, “OK, you better run the rest of them off the other way then.”
At 13:45 radar service was terminated and control of Flight 705 was transferred to Miami ARTCC. When the flight did not establish radio communication with ARTCC on the initial frequency, Departure Control provided a secondary frequency, and instructed the flight to turn to a heading of 360 degrees which was acknowledged. When Miami ARTCC requested position and altitude, the flight replied, “We’re just out of seventeen five (17,500 feet) and standby on the DME one.”
At 13:47:25 the altitude began increasing with a rate of climb gradually increasing to approximately 9,000 feet per minute at 13:47:38. Following this the rate of climb decreased through zero at 13:47:47 when the altitude peaked momentarily at 19,285 feet. During this climb the airspeed decreased from 270 to 215 knots and as the peak altitude was approached, the vertical accelerations changed rapidly from 1G to about -2G. In the next seven seconds the negative acceleration continued to increase at a slower rate, with rapid fluctuations, to a mean value of about -2.8G, while altitude was lost at an increasing rate. As the descent continued with rapidly increasing airspeed, the acceleration trace went from the high negative peak to 1.5G, where it reversed again.
Below 10,000 feet a severe in-flight breakup of the forward fuselage occurred. The main failures in both wings and horizontal stabilizers were in a downward direction, and virtually symmetrical. The forward fuselage broke upward and the vertical stabilizer failed to the left. All four engines generally separated upward and outboard. The debris fell in unpopulated area of the Everglades National Park, 37 miles west-southwest of Miami International Airport

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The unfavourable interaction of severe vertical air drafts and large longitudinal control displacements resulting in a longitudinal “upset” from which a successful recovery was not made.”

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Today is Monday the 11th of February, 2019

Mon, 02/11/2019 - 08:16

We kick off the new week with the following stories…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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