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Updated: 1 hour 29 min ago

EMT Critically Injured When Struck by Impaired Driver

Tue, 09/19/2017 - 07:42

SHELBY COUNTY, Tenn. — An EMT was hurt Saturday morning when an impaired driver hit him, according to police.

A Shelby County EMT was injured Saturday morning after deputies told FOX13 he was hit by an impaired driver.

Crews were called to the accident scene around 6 a.m.

Officials told FOX13 the EMT was in an Emergency Service Unit vehicle when he was struck. They said he was trapped in the vehicle for about 40 minutes.

He was transported in critical condition. We are told he has multiple broken bones, but is expected to recover.

The suspect was taken into custody. That person’s name has not yet been released.

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How To Be An Amazing EMS Mentor

Sat, 09/16/2017 - 06:19
—And why you probably don’t have a choice.

Let’s be honest.

We all want an awesome mentor.

Someone to take us by the hand and show us a better way.

Someone to save us time, money and frustration. How awesome would that be, right?

Here’s the thing.

If you’re good at what you do, sooner or later the day will come when someone – an employee, co-worker, student or acquaintance – comes to you for advice.

Someone who is looking for a mentor, and to them, you fit the bill perfectly.

Is Mentoring Worth It

Is mentoring worth the effort?

In a word, yes.

But, it’s a very personal decision. You must decide how much value mentoring has to you.

After watching hundreds of professional flight crews mentor wannabe flight crews, I can tell you with certainty it’s a pretty great experience for all involved. A lot of times the mentor benefits as much or more than the mentee.

Why?

Because the feeling you get when someone tells you they’re “living their dream” thanks to your help, is pretty incredible. It’s right up there with someone thanking you for saving their life.

If you’re EMS, you know exactly what I’m talking about.

So how do you do it? And how do you get good at it?

How do you become the amazing mentor you would want to have for yourself?

Here are 10 tips to get you started:

10 Tips for Becoming An Amazing EMS Mentor 1. Be a giver

It kind of goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyways.

Being a mentor is about being a giver. And it’s also about giving for the right reasons.

Know your priorities up front. Are you mentoring for the right reasons? If your only motivation is yourself, stop. Mentoring isn’t about you.

Don’t trap someone and force your personal story upon them.

Mentoring is about helping others for the right reasons. Give more than you get.

2. Give Advice Beyond Work

Think how shallow your life would be if all you did was work. If your biggest source of happiness was work.

Think how much you would be missing. I know from personal experience it’s not fulfilling. You can read 10 Warning Signs of Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome (AIDS) here.

The point is to give advice beyond work. Get to know the whole person. Find out their hopes, dreams, plans and schemes beyond work.

If you help a person advance their EMS or Air medical career and they’re still unhappy, how much did your really help them?

3. Set Expectations Up Front

Set expectations together in the very beginning.

Until you know exactly what a person wants to achieve, and how they hope to achieve it, you really can’t help them.

It’s important to sit down and go over expectations, especially if you’re just meeting each other or have spent little time together.

This scenario happens often with EMS. For example, a student aspires to become a paramedic and wants your experienced paramedic advice on how to do it.

You might be wondering if they want to work for your company, or if they’re just looking for advice on how to become a paramedic anywhere. It’s the type of thing you want to ask up front.

4. Approach Each Mentorship Differently

People are different. As a mentor, you need to adapt your style to what works best for the person seeking your advice. Again, remember that it’s not about you.

It’s about getting results for the person you’re helping.

Remind yourself what worked best for you, or the last person you mentored, may or may not work today.

We see examples of this in EMS Flight Safety Network all the time. What got one person hired as a flight medic a year ago, may or may not help a person who aspires to fly today. They’re two different people and a lot can change in a year.

5. Mentor with Passion

The greatest of mentors inspire their mentees and become living examples to emulate.

How do they do it?

They do it by exuding a genuine passion for their work. Get excited about EMS and what you do. Passion is contagious.

Remind yourself of why you chose an EMS career. Remind yourself it was a good decision then, and it’s still a great career now.

 

Share a story that ignites your passion. Your commitment to EMS and why you picked EMS as a career will shine through.

6. Tell the Truth About Mistakes You’ve Made

Be open to sharing your mistakes and failures.

It’s hard to do, but it’s important for a lot of reasons.

Your mentoree puts you on a pedestal. Depending on their experience, they may or may not realize you’re as human and mistake prone as the rest of us.

Sharing your failures humanizes you and builds trust. We all know how humbling EMS can be. Help your mentoree by showing them how you’ve been humbled in the past.

7. Celebrate Their Successes

It’s easy to fall into an EMS negativity trap when mentoring. Great mentors avoid this trap.

It’s likely someone wants your advice or help with a problem they’re experiencing.

Great mentors quickly get past the problems and move on to the actions required to reach a solution.

When you take the time to highlight and even celebrate your mentee’s successes and achievements, you’re not just balancing out the mood of potentially negative conversations — you’re also building your mentee’s confidence, reinforcing good behavior, and keeping them focused and motivated.

8. Don’t Assume Anything

It’s easy to think everyone followed your path into an EMS or air medical career. But it’s not realistic.

Even when you have similar backgrounds e.g. same school, same town, same fire company, etc, it’s still important to guard against making assumptions.

The best way to learn your mentorees background is to ask. Let them tell their story. Listen intently to the details. It will make you a stand-out mentor.

9. Seek Out Classes or Projects

Use your experience to find classes and projects you know would help your mentoree.

Don’t waste anyone’s time with busy work. Remember, your mentoree isn’t stupid. They picked you as a mentor, right?

That’s why you have to find and recommend courses that they’ll find interesting, learn from and will actually help them.

It’s not difficult to do, but it takes more effort than recommending a computerized training system (CTS) with the same modules and questions they’ll be answering for years to come.

10. Lead by Example

We’ve all heard the cliche “Do as I say, not as I do.”

Well, there’s no room for it when mentoring. You have to actually “walk the walk.” This is important, especially in EMS.

Why?

Because EMS is full of mediocre managers and damn few leaders. It hurts me to write it, but it’s true. If you’ve ever had the displeasure of working for someone who isn’t qualified to do what you do, and has never done what you’re doing, you know exactly what I’m talking about.

The silver lining is these folks never get asked to mentor. Nobody wants to follow in the footsteps of the incompetent manager everybody ridicules. And that’s the point! Don’t be that guy or gal.

Lead by doing. Lead by example.

What To Do Now

If you’re good at what you do, getting asked to mentor is really just a matter of time. It’s a question of when you’re asked, not if you’ll be asked.

That’s why there’s really no choice about it.

My best advice is to start getting ready now. It’s as easy as asking yourself what you really wish someone had told you before you started your career.

Get that answer ready in your head, and you’re off to a good start to becoming an amazing mentor.

What’s your best advice? Share it or something one of your mentors taught you —  in the comments section below.

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Off-duty EMT Saves Woman from Burning Car

Fri, 09/15/2017 - 10:04
— After woman crashes car into back of propane truck.

HINDS COUNTY, Miss. — An off-duty EMT rescued a woman from a burning car after she crashed into the back of a propane truck.

WAPT reported that EMT, Jim White, helped pull the female driver, who was trapped inside the burning car, to safety.

The driver of a 2015 Chrysler 200 swerved in an effort to avoid hitting a propane truck, but apparently hit the back of the truck, causing the car to catch fire, according to the Hinds County Sheriff’s Department.

“She tried to go around him but she ran into the gas truck and it immediately caught on fire. We ran to her, got her out of the car, stabilized her and moved her away from the vehicle,” said EMT White.

Hinds County officials said deputies were able to fight the fire with fire extinguishers until fire personnel made it to the scene.

The woman and the driver of the propane truck were both transported by ambulance to a local hospital. The woman was listed in serious condition. The other driver’s condition was not known.

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Ohio Firefighter Says He’d Save Dog from Fire Before a Black Man

Thu, 09/14/2017 - 17:12
—A screenshot of the firefighter’s Facebook post was captured by a local news station.

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP, OH  –  A Franklin Township volunteer firefighter has been suspended indefinitely after appearing to make racist remarks on Facebook.

Fox 19 reported volunteer firefighter Tyler Roysdon said the following on facebook:

“If he went inside the burning house of a black man and he had a dog that he would save the dog first and probably take his time coming back to get the black man.”

Fox 19 also reported the comments escalated from here. The “n” word was used numerous times according to the news station.

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Fatal Ambulance Crash Investigated as a Homicide

Thu, 09/14/2017 - 13:18
-Witnesses said the driver of the ambulance was speeding and swerving like a drunk driver.

OKLAHOMA CITY — A fatal ambulance crash is now being investigated as a homicide.

The driver of the ambulance was 34-year-old Matthew Erickson. He was taking 66-year-old Carolyn Koch and and another woman to the hospital when it veered off the road. The crash killed Koch and seriously injured the other woman. 

According to police documents, witnesses said they saw the St. Anthony ambulance was speeding and swerving, likening it to behavior of a drunk driver.

Paramedic Chelsea Stewart, who was in the ambulance during the crash, said Erickson was swerving and hitting the rumble strips on the road. She told him to stop, saying “it was not funny.”

Erickson’s partner told investigators that she was concerned about Erickson’s driving ability that night because she was having a hard time keeping him awake during the overnight shift.

Days before the crash, Erickson was taken off duty for sleeping on the job.

More information available at News9.com.

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Remains of Duke Life Flight Crew Escorted Home

Wed, 09/13/2017 - 15:05
— The Duke Life Flight helicopter crashed in Perquimans County killing three crew members and a medical patient.

RALEIGH, N.C. – The remains of the Duke Life Flight crew members killed in a crash Friday are being escorted home Wednesday from eastern North Carolina.

Four people were killed Friday when a Duke Life Flight medical helicopter crashed in northeast North Carolina, according to the State Highway Patrol.

The crash occurred in a grassy field near Amazon’s wind farm outside the town of Belvidere, south of the Perquimans-Gates county line.

The helicopter, which was based at Johnston Regional Airport in Smithfield, was en route to Duke University Hospital in Durham from Sentara Albemarle Medical Center in Elizabeth City when it went down, officials said. A pilot, two medical personnel and a patient were aboard at the time, officials said.

Law enforcement officers joined firefighters, EMTs and other first responders in a procession in honor of the victims.

More information is available here.

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Ambulance Causes NASCAR Crash

Wed, 09/13/2017 - 10:31
—Driver Did Not Follow Directions

RICHMOND, Va. — An ambulance that caused a crash during a NASCAR race did not stop when told to do so, according to NASCAR officials.

Officials said the ambulance did not stop when it was told to do so, causing an incident that forced NASCAR driver Matt Kenseth out of the race.

According to NBC Sports, an ambulance at the entrance of pit road during a Cup race at Richmond Raceway caused NASCAR driver Matt Kenseth to crash into the back of Clint Bowyer’s car after several cars braked. Kenseth’s car was unable to finish the race due to a damaged radiator.

NASCAR senior vice president of competition Scott Miller said the EMS provider was ordered to stop.

“We had a situation where a directive was given from the tower and it wasn’t followed, and we’ll do our due diligence why it wasn’t followed and make sure that we’re prepared to never make that mistake again,” Miller said.

The track workers are usually very, very good at following the directives and tonight they didn’t.’’

NASCAR driver Kasey Kahne said he experienced a close call trying to avoid the ambulance and the cars.

“Everybody is braking hard because what happens is the leaders go to the line and everybody speeds up to get there and it’s an accordion effect,” Kahne said. “It gets worse the further back. Usually you have a couple of lanes and you offset yourself. There was only basically one lane and everybody ran out of room.”

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Hospital Orders Firefighter to Remove 911 Memorial Flag from His Truck

Tue, 09/12/2017 - 12:20

LINCOLN, Nebraska  — A volunteer firefighter was told to remove a flag honoring fallen firefighters by his hospital employer.

Cody Meredith, an employee at Crete Area Medical Center, put this flag on his truck Monday to honor fallen firefighters. But he said his supervisors told him to remove it.

Mr. Meredith went to work on Sept. 11th with a mounted black and white U.S. flag with a single red stripe to pay tribute to fallen firefighters. The supervisors of Crete Area Medical Center allegedly told him to take the flag down, or remove his truck from hospital property.

”The guy said, ‘Just remove the flag and we’ll be done with it,’” Meredith’s wife Kristin, who witnessed the incident, said.

Kristin, who is also a volunteer firefighter, contacted a newspaper about the incident and wrote about it on Facebook before the hospital apologized, calling it a misunderstanding.

“It’s Sept. 11, Patriot Day,” she said. “We take fallen firefighters very seriously.”

Here’s why: She and her husband are both volunteer firefighters. Their fathers were firefighters. Cody Meredith recently lost a friend, a firefighter, to cancer.

“It’s just something that’s always been in both of our lives,” she said.

More details here in the Lincoln Journal Star.

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Woman Delivers Her Own Baby During Hurricane Irma

Mon, 09/11/2017 - 08:42
—Dispatcher Talks Her Through The Steps

MIAMI, FL  — Woman delivers own baby as paramedics unable to respond during brunt of hurricane Irma. Dispatcher talks to woman on phone and gives step-by-step instructions.

A pregnant woman in Little Haiti called 911 for help as she started labor during the peak of hurrican Irma in Miami.

With paramedics unable to go out into the storm, a dispatcher talked the woman through delivering her baby at home Sunday morning, according to Assistant Fire Chief Eloy Garcia.

Mom and baby girl were eventually taken to the hospital by emergency workers.

“We weren’t able to respond. So she delivered the placenta, also. Dispatch told her how to tie it off. She’s stable at home,” Garcia said.

“We made contact with the assistant medical director here. Talked things through.”

Pete Gomez, Miami’s emergency management director, said conditions remain dangerous, so replacement crews will not be coming in until the weather improves.

“We’ve got to follow our protocol,” he said.

More information about this case and others is available via the Miami Herald.

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EMS Stands Up To Hurricane IRMA

Sun, 09/10/2017 - 15:00

TALLAHASSE, FL – Hundreds of ambulances from across the United States lined up in a staging area in Tallahassee, Florida — ready to face hurricane Irma head on and help people wherever needed.

Ever wondered what makes Emergency Medical Services (EMS) a great career?

Hint: It’s not the long hours or ‘high’ pay.

It’s the people.

People are what makes EMS great.

And people are what makes the United States a great country.

At EMS Flight Safety Network, we’re proud to be part of the EMS team.

EMS Stands Up to Hurricane Irma

Photo Credit: Ray Bryant, West Virginia Task Force and Joe Lattanzi, New York Task Force

Additional credit to Anthony Goreman’s facebook post here.

Thank you to all first responders! We appreciate you.

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Man Who Fell From Helipad Dies

Sun, 09/10/2017 - 13:06

SPOKANE, WA — A man died Friday afternoon when he fell from the rooftop helicopter pad at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center.

Major Crimes detectives from the Spokane Police Department were on the scene just west of the hospital’s emergency room Friday afternoon. Police received the initial call around 12:30 p.m., said Spokane Police Officer Josh Laiva.

Police do not suspect foul play, Laiva said.

Laiva said there were multiple witnesses who were speaking with police.

It’s unclear how the man reached the helicopter pad, which is on the roof of the hospital’s main tower.

Updated information is available at the Spokesman-Review.

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The Truth About Medical Helicopter Crashes

Sun, 09/10/2017 - 08:45
—And Why Truth Is So Hard To Find

Why do so many medical helicopters crash?

It’s a fair question.

One that begs an answer.

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably asked yourself this very question, right?

You’re a smart person, and you know most air medical crews are smart too.

Common sense tells you these professionals are taking every safety precaution possible.

Nobody rational goes to work thinking it’s their last day alive. No flight crews get into medical helicopters unless they believe it’s safe.

Yet…

Medical helicopters keep crashing.

Why?

Before I share the EMS Flight Safety Network opinion on why medical helicopters crash, I want to address some of the arguments (ones I know you’ll hear), about why medical helicopters crash.

Stating The Obvious About Medical Helicopter Crashes

It should go without saying, but I’m going to say it anyway.

The goal of all discussion regarding medical helicopter crashes is to prevent future crashes. Period.

Sadly, there are places on the internet where other agendas win out. That’s the reason I’m stating the obvious. Understandably, there’s a ton of emotion attached to every EMS helicopter crash.

When highly trained professionals risk their lives to help others, and then lose their lives in the process, it’s tragic and emotional.

No doubt about it.

That’s one of the reasons it’s important to talk about medical helicopter crashes. The best way to honor the memory of lost air medical crews is by taking personal responsibility for making air medical better and safer. Burying your head in the sand will not bring lost crews back to life, or protect future crews.

My Best Advice On Medical Helicopter Crashes

Answers about why medical helicopters crash are hard to find. Why?

Because truth is a tough demon to fight. It’s much easier to hide behind emotion than to address real issues.

When it comes to answers about why medical helicopters crash, my best advice is to constantly remind yourself that every health system, helicopter company and association has an agenda.

An agenda bigger than any one helicopter crash.

All have biases and preconceived ideas about what’s most important when it comes to medical helicopter safety.

These biases influence how they share information about medical helicopter crashes, and what actions they take to prevent them. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. But it is something you definitely want to keep top of mind.

Never forget that your best advocate for crew safety is you.

Don’t be fooled by the “smoke and mirrors” of statistics from government agencies with unlimited budgets, time and people – who coincidentally, NEVER fly on medical helicopters.

If you’re professional air medical crew, wannabe crew or just someone who loves helicopters: remember that if something just plain feels wrong, it doesn’t matter how many people try to convince you it’s a new and better way. It’s still just plain wrong.

It really is that simple.

The Problem With Unlimited Information

You’ve probably heard the cliche about opinions and a-holes, right?

Well, there’s some truth to it.

Everyone has an opinion about why medical helicopters crash, but very few of these opinions have any basis in reality. Even fewer opinions come from people who have ever flown in medical helicopters.

This creates some practical challenges.

Think of it this way: you can’t lose weight reading a book about weight loss, right? You have to actually take action and DO the steps required to lose weight. Everyone gets this. But there are still thousands of weight-loss diets and libraries full of books about the best ways to lose weight.

And here’s the kicker: when it’s all said and done – move more, eat less – never really changes when it comes to weight loss.

Information about Medical helicopters works the same way.

You can find all kinds of information about medical helicopter crashes, but very little of that information is practical or useful. Most of the information has nothing to do with why helicopters crash and how to prevent future crashes. It’s typically one of two things:

  1. A wolf in sheep’s clothing – meaning it’s “safety information” with the real intent of forwarding a company or association agenda.
  2. Big data – reams of statistics and information that unfiltered is virtually useless.

But don’t take my word for it, do your own investigation.

Even a small amount of research will quickly lead you to conflicting information about why medical helicopters continue to crash.

So what’s the solution? Start by knowing and understanding your sources.

Examples Of Medical Helicopter Crash ‘Solutions’

The air medical industry likes to point fingers at information availability.

What is information availability and what does it have to do with medical helicopters?

Information availability is about how much news coverage is committed to any particular newsworthy event. In regard to medical helicopters, it’s a view that says all medical helicopter crashes get massive amounts of press and publicity.

Like all good arguments, there’s some truth to this viewpoint. Medical helicopter crashes do get lots of publicity and news coverage.

But, here’s the catch…

The people who push the information availability viewpoint would have you believe medical helicopters don’t crash very often. They describe medical helicopter crashes as statistically insignificant. They believe the number of medical helicopter crashes is so small that the real issue is more about public perception than helicopter crashes.

They believe when medical helicopters crash, the media jumps all over it and makes a big fuss about it. That’s the argument behind information availability as an answer to why medical helicopters crash.

For the record, since when is even one medical helicopter crash not a big deal? It certainly is a big deal to the countless lives it changes forever.

The Apples Vs. Oranges Medical Helicopter Solution

A second viewpoint of medical helicopter crashes is what I call the “apples to oranges” comparison and solution.

It goes something like this:

Government agencies with unlimited budgets and time recite mind-numbing statistics comparing commercial airline crashes to medical helicopter crashes.

Right about the moment your eyes glaze over from the sheer boredom of listening to the world’s worst public speakers read from their notes or powerpoint slides, the presenter admits medical helicopters do crash at a rate almost four times greater than commercial airlines.

This admission is immediately followed by a caveat about the explosive growth of the air medical industry over the last decade.

The end result is always some version of “more data is needed” before any conclusions can be made.

What is implied is that medical helicopter crashes may actually be decreasing or less than previous years in relative terms. What’s further implied is that somehow the FAA’s efforts had something to do with this decline in crashes.

To be kind, it’s not very helpful or useful information.

If after reading this section you’re angry that you’ll never get this time back in your life, please know that I feel your pain. Be thankful you got the cliff notes version of the typical government bureaucrat presentation.

What the FAA lacks in real results, they compensate for with repetition.

A Second Apples to Oranges Solution

A second “apples to oranges” comparison you’ll find without too much difficulty is a comparison of ambulance crashes to helicopter crashes.

This information is not useful or helpful in regard to preventing future helicopter crashes. The conclusion is always some version of how ambulances and ground vehicles experience many many more crashes than helicopters or aircraft. The conclusion typically circles back to tie in to the information availability argument.

The one positive to this comparison is how it highlights the real risks for our EMS ground providers. I’m glad to see these risks recognized and hopefully the exposure leads to positive change for ambulance staff.

So what’s the answer?

The Truth is Worse Than You Think

What’s the real truth about medical helicopter crashes?

The truth is there are no new reasons for helicopter crashes.

The air medical industry continues to make the same mistakes it made a decade ago.

Need proof?

Read the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) reports. What you’ll notice almost immediately are patterns. We keep repeating the same mistakes… over and over.

There are no “new” reasons for medical helicopter crashes, only new interpretations of the data. Sad, but true.

What To Do Now

So where do we go from here?

Now that we know the truth, what do we do about it?

The EMS Flight Safety Network opinion is the topic of different upcoming articles. Spoiler alert: you can definitely find some of our philosophies on improving the medical helicopter crash record in this article: 5 Ways EMS Goes from Good To Great.

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Duke Life Flight Helicopter Crash Kills Four

Fri, 09/08/2017 - 15:29
— Pilot, Nurse, Medic and Patient Perish in Helicopter Crash

BELVIDERE, NC – Four people were killed Friday when a Duke Life Flight medical helicopter crashed in northeast North Carolina, according to the State Highway Patrol.

The crash occurred in a grassy field near a wind farm outside the town of Belvidere, south of the Perquimans-Gates county line.

The helicopter was en route to Duke University Hospital in Durham from Sentara Albemarle Medical Center in Elizabeth City when it went down, officials said. A pilot, two medical personnel and a patient were aboard at the time, officials said.

The names of the victims haven’t been released.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board went to the crash site Friday afternoon to assist with the investigation into the cause of the crash.

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Paramedic and Police Union Patriots Boycott Cleveland Browns Opener

Mon, 09/04/2017 - 17:45

CLEVELAND — Members of unions representing Cleveland police officers and paramedics have said they won’t hold a large U.S. flag during pregame ceremonies prior to next Sunday’s Cleveland Browns season opener.

The unions’ refusal to participate in the on-field ceremony at First Energy Stadium before next Sunday’s game against the Pittsburgh Steelers comes after nearly a dozen Browns players knelt during the anthem before a preseason home game last month.

Steve Loomis, president of the Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association, cited his service in the U.S. Navy when he told WKYC-TV he was astounded that Browns management knew of the protests but allowed it to occur.

“I am not going to participate or work with management that allows their players to disrespect the flag and the national anthem,” Loomis said.

Cleveland police chief Calvin Williams released a statement Sunday night in response to the refusal to hold the flag at the Browns’ season opener.

A team spokesman has said the organization respects the anthem and flag but also respects personal expression.

The Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association members also are refusing to participate in the flag ceremony.

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Update: Nurse Assaulted By Police Officer Gets ‘Apology’

Sat, 09/02/2017 - 06:55
—Links to arrest video and police statement

Police work is hard.

And it’s getting harder and harder.

The riots across the United States are proof.

Imagine being a target simply because you wear a uniform. Or, maybe you don’t have to imagine?

The sad truth is…

Police, fire and EMS don’t have to imagine what it’s like to be a potential target for violence. They know they’re targets.

They know their own safety is at much greater risk than maybe any other time in history.

That’s the reason police, fire and EMS need to work together.

It’s also the reason this update is so difficult to write.

This week a Utah police officer assaulted a nurse for refusing to draw blood from an unconscious patient. If you haven’t seen it already, you can watch the video on EMS Flight Safety Network facebook page.

It’s difficult to watch. Even after reminding myself how difficult police work is, and giving the officer full benefit of any doubt, the video is disturbing.

But unfortunately, it’s not the most disturbing part.

The most disturbing part is the Utah police department’s reaction to the video.

They (the Utah police department) read an obviously canned, pre-written response intended to apologize for the arresting officer’s actions. Again, giving the arresting officer and Utah police department the greatest benefit of doubt…

The ‘apology’ is pretty pathetic.

You can watch the Utah police department apology statement here.

EMS understands as well as anyone that mistakes happen. EMS gets it. EMS knows how humbling public service work can be. It’s time for police services to get it too.

Let me know what you think in the comments below. It matters.

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2 Dead, 4 Injured In Shooting at New Mexico Library

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 14:41
— Medical Helicopter on Standby

CLOVIS, N.M. — A shooting inside a public library that killed two people and wounded four has shaken a small eastern New Mexico community to its core.

A lone male suspect is in custody, police said, but his motive remains unclear.

Police Chief Douglas Ford said two females were killed, and two males and two females were injured. The injured were transported to a hospital across the state line in Lubbock, Tex., Reuters reported.

The gunman surrendered after the shooting Monday and was taken into custody without incident after police entered the Clovis-Carver Public Library, authorities and elected officials with the city of Clovis said during a news conference. Warrants for his arrest were being prepared, but it’s wasn’t immediately clear what charges he would face.

Clovis Mayor David Lansford said things could have been much worse had it not been for the quick response, training and courage of police.

He called the shooting tragic and senseless.

“This is a big blow to our community,” he said. “Our community is a community that places a high value on life and the sanctity of life. And each life that lives in this community is precious. So we’re all hurting right now as a result of what took place this afternoon.”

Clovis, a city of about 40,000, is about 200 miles east of Albuquerque, near the Texas state line. The area is home to Cannon Air Force Base. The nearby community of Portales is home to Eastern New Mexico University.

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‘Cajun Navy’ Helps Texas Hurricane Victims

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 07:01
— The ‘Cajun Navy’ is an informal network of good Samaritans from Louisiana. 

HOUSTON — A group of good Samaritans from Louisiana is bringing small boats to Houston to help those stranded in the Hurricane Harvey flooding.

According to  USA Today, the Cajun Navy was formed 12 years ago after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina and has already saved thousands of people, and is now helping to rescue Texans.

“There’s no telling how many are already over there,” member Joey Hains said. “Basically everybody that’s wanting to go help out” is going or has already arrived, he said.

The Cajun Navy brings hunting boats, airboats and kayaks. But most importantly, it brings people with grit determined to help people in need.

And even though a state lawmaker tried to require permit fees and training, an actual census of the group has not been taken.

“The reality of the Cajun Navy is everybody out here with a boat that isn’t devastated gets out and helps others,” member Clyde Cain said.

Hains said that based on their communications, there are about 100 members in Houston helping with the disaster.

Hains also said that they remember the kindness Houston showed Louisiana after Katrina, and he and the other members of the Cajun Navy just want to do the same thing. “We’re just more than willing to go and help wherever we can.”

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Medics Protect Patient After Bullet Pierces Ambulance

Mon, 08/28/2017 - 20:03

PHILADELPHIA — An ambulance was hit by a stray bullet while transporting a patient to the hospital.

6 Action News of West Philadelphia reported the ambulance was en-route to the hospital with a patient on board when gunfire erupted around the ambulance.

Paramedics say situations like this one don’t happen all the time, but are frequent enough that it’s not considered a rare event.

Philadelphia Deputy Fire Commissioner of EMS Fire Operations Gary Loesch said the paramedics got down on the floor of the ambulance and protected the patient until the gunfire stopped.

“It’s unfortunate our people are put in these positions when people hear that firefighters take their lives in their hands every day, they don’t realize medics and EMTs take their lives in their hands every day, and it’s not by fire, but by incident and situation they’re put into,” Loesch said.

Police are currently investigating the incident.

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