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NEWSROOM | Multimedia | California Governor's Office of Emergency Services
Updated: 1 hour 47 min ago

Wildfire Recovery Continues in North Coast, New Assistance Available for Over-Excavated Parcels in Mendocino County

Wed, 04/18/2018 - 22:38

Tonight, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) and the County of Mendocino announced a new service available to those concerned about over-excavation on their parcels who survived the Redwood Valley wildfire in October 2017.

Cal OES is working in coordination with the Mendocino County Executive Office Fire Recovery Team to examine each site and determine if over excavation occurred. For properties that meet the criteria for over excavation, Cal OES will work to make replacement soil available for qualified parcels. This effort is in the continued effort to expedite the recovery process of each survivor and community.

“We’re going to be moving very quickly,” said Eric Lamoureux, Cal OES Deputy Director of Response and Recovery. “My expectation is that this is something that will take a matter of weeks.”

Lamoureux noted that the statewide recovery operations has also worked to address the needs of the many communities impacted by the loss of approximately 11,000 homes, businesses, structures and outbuildings from catastrophic fires of late 2017.

If you believe that your parcel may qualify for over excavation and you want your site assessed, the County Recovery Team is available to receive your concerns and coordinate the process for Cal OES to assess your property. Please call (707) 234-6076.

Full video to tonight’s town hall meeting from Redwood Valley, Calif.

HayWired: Focusing on the Fault

Wed, 04/18/2018 - 18:47

Today, on the 112th anniversary of the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake, Cal OES joined experts and representatives from many disciplines and agencies on the UC Berkeley campus to discuss the HayWired Scenario, a regional and statewide earthquake preparedness initiative that aims to shift behavior about earthquakes, bolster awareness, and ensure that everyone is better prepared.

The HayWired Scenario is a hypothetical earthquake sequence that is being used to better understand hazards for the San Francisco Bay region during and after an earthquake of magnitude 7 on the Hayward Fault. A large Hayward Fault earthquake will produce strong ground shaking, permanent displacement of the Earth’s surface, landslides, liquefaction (soils becoming liquid-like during shaking), and subsequent fault slip, known as afterslip, as well as aftershocks.

The next large Hayward Fault earthquake is anticipated to affect thousands of structures and disrupt the lives of millions of people. The HayWired scenario examines earthquake hazards to help provide the crucial scientific information that the San Francisco Bay region can use to prepare for the next large earthquake.

The scenario is used to explore how the region will be affected, what information is needed, and what decisions to make before and after an earthquake. Engagement from partnering agencies, scientists, and the community provides even greater realism ultimately providing an even clearer picture of our common threat and what we can do about it.

“This is a call to action day. Everyone should be asking themselves what more can I do,” said Cal OES Deputy Director of Planning, Preparedness, and Prevention Christina Curry.

HayWired is just one of the programs Cal OES participates to promote planning, preparedness, hazard mitigation, and reduce risks among vulnerable areas of California. Since 77 % of country’s earthquake risk is in California, Cal OES has a large mission and in addition to HayWired, Cal OES is focused on reducing risk through several programs.

In 2013, Governor Edmund G Brown Jr. signed a bill directing Cal OES to implement an Earthquake Early Warning System (EEW) in California. ShakeAlert is what will evolve into the EEW system and a final system will probably look very much like this prototype. Currently, sensors are being placed throughout the state.

On October 18 at 10:18 a.m., millions of Californians will once again participate in the Great ShakeOut, the statewide earthquake drill.  Since 2008, ShakeOut has expanded from California to include more than 20 regions, including multiple states and counties.

There is also the Earthquake Brace + Bolt Program, which designed to help homeowners in ZIP codes that face the highest risk of earthquake damage to homes, based on local geological hazards combined with the vulnerability due to home construction type.

Unless we take action today, there will be major losses of life and property. These programs help raise awareness as well as help Californians prepare for the big earthquakes in our future.

You can learn more about these programs and other earthquake related information by visiting the following sites:

Cal OES Earthquake Preparedness

HayWired Scenario

USGS

Ready.gov

ShakeAlert

2018 Great California ShakeOut!

Earthquake Brace + Bolt

Wildfire Recovery Continues as October Wildfire Survivors Move to Expanded Lake Mendocino Facilities

Wed, 04/18/2018 - 11:00

 Recovery continues to move forward, after the October 2017 wildfires ravaged parts of Northern California just over six months ago.    The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) and FEMA along with a number of other state and federal agencies, have been working closely together to provide assistance and resources to survivors affected by the wildfires.   Since the Oct. 10 disaster declaration, nearly 4,500 households have been approved for FEMA individual assistance, for a total of more than $15.8 million. The U.S. Small Business Administration has also approved nearly 1,200 loans for homeowners, renters and businesses for more than $151.9 million.   Shortly after the wildfires, FEMA, Cal OES and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers started working together with Mendocino County on an innovative arrangement to expand and upgrade Kyen Campground at Lake Mendocino to provide short-term housing for survivors. Lake Mendocino, formed with the construction of the Coyote Valley Dam in 1958, is the largest reservoir in Mendocino County and provides flood risk reduction, water resource management and recreational opportunities to improve the quality of life for the public.   FEMA and the county were given a lease for the campground at no cost and construction began at the end of February. A number of infrastructure improvements were made to make the location ready for interim use by survivors, including upgrades to electrical, water, and wastewater distribution systems. The Kyen Campground location will now provide short-term housing for more than 20 families that have been relocated from a previous location at Redwood Empire Fairgrounds.   Currently, roughly 230 families are being housed in a FEMA-provided housing option such as an RV (travel trailers and fifth wheels), Manufactured Housing Unit (MHUs), or direct lease of apartments. In this disaster, as in most, the vast majority of survivors have found their own housing solution. For the relatively small number of people who were unable to do so, a direct housing resource was a potential option for eligible survivors. These resources are throughout multiple locations in Northern California. The completion of the new site and move for the families comes after all survivors that were found eligible for direct housing, now having an interim housing solution.    For more additional updates on California recovery, visit the disaster web page at www.fema.gov/disaster/4344 , Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/femaregion9 and WildfireRecovery.org.

It’s the Season for Taxes and Scams!

Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:08

1789, Benjamin Franklin wrote in a letter, “Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

Mr Franklin was very perceptive to recognize these certainties. However, if he were alive today he might want to add “scammers” to his list.

According to the IRS, there has been a surge in impersonators looking to steal taxpayers’ money or even identity in recent years. Scammers make unsolicited calls claiming to be IRS officials. They demand that the victim pay a bogus tax bill. They con the victim into sending cash, usually through a prepaid debit card or wire transfer.

Learn to protect yourself by identifying scammer tactics:

  • They may alter their phone number so it appears on your caller ID like the IRS or another agency is calling.

 

  • Call to demand immediate payment, nor will the agency call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill.

 

  • Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.

 

  • Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.

 

  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.

 

  • Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying.

 

If you do get a call from someone using any of the above tactics, do not give out any information and hang up immediately.

You should then report the call to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at 800-366-4484 or at www.tigta.gov, as well as the Federal Trade Commission’s  FTC Complaint Assistant.

Latest News: 

Statement from the Franchise Tax Board (FTB): IRS has allowed an additional day to file and pay taxes following IRS system issues that surfaced early on the April 17 tax deadline. Because California taxpayers must generally complete their federal return before their California return can be filed, FTB will follow federal announcement IR-2018-100, April 17, 2018. Individuals and businesses with a filing or payment due date of April 17 will now have until midnight on Wednesday, April 18th. Taxpayers do not need to do anything to receive this extra time.

Additional Resources:

Internal Revenue Service (IRS)

Franchise Tax Board

Learn about cyber dangers and online security – “Have You Changed Your Password Lately? – Blog by Robb Mayberry

 

Six Months After the NorCal October 2017 Wildfires

Tue, 04/10/2018 - 15:35

It’s been six months since the October 2017 wildfires ravaged Northern California. Through coordination with California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and in close partnership with FEMA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. EPA, Cal EPA and CalRecycle, all major work for the removal of fire and ash debris has now been completed in Butte, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, Nevada, Sonoma and Yuba counties. So far, nearly 1.7 million tons of debris, across all seven counties, have been removed.

Since the Oct. 10 disaster declaration, nearly 4,500 households have been approved for FEMA individual assistance, for a total of more than $15.7 million. Of this amount, more than $9.6 million has been approved for housing assistance that can assist with home repairs or replacement, rental assistance to be used to find another place to live temporarily while repairs are being made to their home and more than $6.1 million for other needs assistance. Other needs assistance is a grant to pay for other uninsured or underinsured expenses such as disaster-related medical, dental or funeral costs or personal property losses. The U.S. Small Business Administration is another partner agency that plays an integral role in disaster recovery. The SBA provided assistance to businesses of all sizes, private nonprofits, homeowners and renters in the form of low-interest disaster loans. The SBA has approved nearly 1,200 loans for homeowners, renters and businesses for more than $151 million.

We caught up with Assistant Fire Marshall Paul Lowenthal of the Santa Rosa Fire Department to talk with him about the challenges he and his community faced, what he and his department have learned and what changes have come into play in the short six months since the fires broke-out.

Asst. Fire Marshal Paul Lowenthal Talks with Shawn Boyd in Santa Rosa

 

Links

WildfireRecovery.org

OESNews.com

Santa Rosa Assistant Fire Marshal Signs Right of Entry Form, Begins His Own Recovery

SonomaCountyRecovers.org

Cal OES Flickr Images

 

Governor Brown Commemorates Crime Victims’ Rights Week

Fri, 04/06/2018 - 16:03

Below is a copy of the letter issued by Governor Brown commemorating Crime Victims’ Right Week during April 8-14. Click here to download the letter. 

 

 

For more Information about victims’ rights and resources visit:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signs of Recovery Show Six Months After Most Destructive Wildfires in California History, Debris Removal Reaches Major Milestone

Fri, 04/06/2018 - 15:11

Signs of rebuilding and progress become more evident each day, as it has been six months since the devastating and most destructive wildfires in California history burned and destroyed thousands of homes.

Today, these signs come as cleared lots and frames of new homes stand in the areas like Coffey Park, one of the hardest hit neighborhoods. A large part of facilitating recovery started with the removal of debris, lots of debris. In the first phase of the debris removal efforts, the Environmental Protection Agency and California Department of Toxic Substances Control collected household hazardous waste throughout seven Northern California counties.

Through coordination with California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and in close partnership with FEMA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. EPA, Cal EPA and CalRecycle, all major work for the removal of fire and ash debris has now been completed in Butte, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, Nevada, Sonoma and Yuba counties. So far, nearly 1.7 million tons of debris, across all seven counties, has been removed.

Since the Oct. 10 disaster declaration, nearly 4,500 households have been approved for FEMA individual assistance, for a total of more than $15.7 million. Of this amount, more than $9.6 million has been approved for housing assistance that can assist with home repairs or replacement, rental assistance to be used to find another place to live temporarily while repairs are being made to their home and more than $6.1 million for other needs assistance. Other needs assistance is a grant to pay for other uninsured or underinsured expenses such as disaster-related medical, dental or funeral costs or personal property losses.

The U.S. Small Business Administration is another partner agency that plays an integral role in disaster recovery. The SBA provided assistance to businesses of all sizes, private nonprofits, homeowners and renters in the form of low-interest disaster loans. The SBA has approved nearly 1,200 loans for homeowners, renters and businesses for more than $151 million.

About 640 eligible Northern California households also participated in the Transitional Sheltering Assistance (TSA) program to stay in a hotel/motel temporarily at no cost to the survivor, because their primary residence was not safe or able to be occupied, and they could not find a viable rental option.

Currently, roughly 230 families are being housed in a FEMA-provided housing option such as an RV (travel trailers and fifth wheels), Manufactured Housing Unit (MHUs), or direct lease of apartments. In this disaster, as in most, the vast majority of survivors have found their own housing solution. For the relatively small number of people who were unable to do so, a direct housing resource was a potential option for eligible survivors. These resources are throughout multiple locations in Northern California, including Sonoma County Fairgrounds, Redwood Empire Fairgrounds (Mendocino County), Berry Creek Rancheria RV Park (Butte County), and Clear Lake Resort (Lake County) as well as individual apartments and private land throughout the seven counties approved for direct housing. More than 20 families in Mendocino County will move later this month to an RV facility at Lake Mendocino that FEMA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers worked together to expand and upgrade for interim use by survivors.

Reimbursements to state and local agencies have also been awarded, under the FEMA Public Assistance program. The PA program is intended to benefit everyone — neighborhoods, cities, counties and states. Public Assistance dollars help clean up communities affected by disaster- related debris, repair or replace infrastructure damaged by the disaster such as roads and bridges and reimburse for emergency protective measures such as overtime costs for first responders or evacuation and sheltering activities. So far, more than $271.8 million in public assistance grants has been obligated for eligible disaster–related costs, and the coming months will see millions in additional federal and state assistance to cities, counties, utility districts and other PA recipients.

Significant recovery progress has been made over the last six months, but preparing for future disasters remains essential. Increased flood risks that follow fires will persist for several years, and survivors can increase their financial protection by buying insurance now. Click here for information on flood risks after fire, go to  or visit California Department of Water Resources for more information.

Fear and Respect the Flash Flood, Play it Safe and Live

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 18:40

Another surge of tropical moisture will arrive in Central California by late week, and could last into the weekend. This warm and wet system has the potential to bring heavy rain, flooding, and debris flows, especially near recent burn scars. Southern California could see two to four inches of rainfall, while northern California will see heavy rainfall and gusty winds.

So with that, take a long, hard look at the photos in this story. These are from the flash-floods and resulting mudslides in Montecito in January. It’s a rude awakening to the power of a flash-flood and the debris it can bring with it. Don’t underestimate the potential – play it safe and heed any warnings that may come your way.

And these were posted on social media by two people on the scene of flash flooding that devastated the El Capitan State Beach campground in Santa Barbara County last year. Santa Barbara Fire officials say nearly two dozen people had to be rescued, and luckily no one was killed. KTLA reported that rescues began before 10:30 a.m., when mud, tree branches and debris clogged a creek at El Capitan State Beach and caused runoff to overflow the park’s campground, according to Santa Barbara County fire spokesman Mike Eliason. The flooding inundated tents, yurts and campground buildings and caused a number of cabins and parked cars to float away and eventually become pinned in a pile of debris, according to Eliason.

How do you prepare yourself for this kind of flash flooding, can you? As a camper, you likely could not have predicted your cabin was going to wash away, but you might have been able to know that flooding was very possible due to the amount of rainfall in such a short period of time. The experts at CanyoneeringUSA.com say “the key thing to understand is floods are predictable and avoidable.” Knowing your surroundings, their condition, and getting valuable information from park officials would be critical; ask when you arrive. Be sure to visit the links below to learn more about flooding/flash flooding and how you can avoid disaster.

Click to view slideshow.

Some Flash Flood Rules of Thumb (CanyoneeringUSA.com):

  • If the Thunderheads are already forming by noon, things are going to be bad
  • If you cannot see through the rain falling from a thunderstorm, it is strong enough to create a flash flood
  • Once the rain begins, flash flood conditions can develop in less than 5 minutes
  • If your inner gut says ‘no’, listen to it. Go do something else
  • However high you think you need to be to be safe from the flood, go at least twice as high
  • If getting caught, do not try to outrun the flood unless you are very close to the end. Instead, find a place where you can climb out of the canyon or to a secure place HIGH on the canyon wall
  • When camping in a narrow canyon, camp high above the canyon floor, above any signs of previous floods. Camp somewhere with safe pathways to go higher if needed

In the video below, it shows the dramatic onslaught of a flash flood in Nevada. Do you really think you could outrun this, or jump out of the way if it caught you by surprise?

What to do during a flash flood watch

A flash flood watch is issued when the conditions are right for flooding. It doesn’t necessarily mean that a flood will happen, only that it could. Nonetheless, it should be taken seriously. Remember, flash floods can happen quickly.

  • Listen to your TV or radio/weather radio and monitor social media for weather updates and emergency instructions
  • Have a plan for where you will go if you need to reach higher ground
  • Make sure your route avoids low-lying areas
  • Never walk or drive through flood waters
  • Make sure your emergency flood kit is stocked

What to do during a flash flood warning

A flash flood warning is issued when a flash flood is imminent or is already occurring. You should:

  • Move to higher ground immediately or stay on higher ground
  • Keep your radio/weather radio on, monitor weather updates on social media if possible and,
  • Evacuate if necessary

If you’re driving:

  • Move to higher ground immediately and avoid stopping near streams, rivers, or creeks
  • Never drive through flood water, even if it looks shallow. It may be deeper than it looks and just 2 feet of water can sweep your car away
LINKS

http://www.caloes.ca.gov/ICESite/Pages/Winter-Storms-Preparedness.aspx

Cal OES Preparedness Tips

National Weather Service

California Highway Patrol – Winter Driving Tips

Caltrans – Road Conditions 

Department of Water Resources – Do You Know Your Risk? 

Ready.gov 

http://disastercenter.com/californ/californ.htm

One Month Left to Apply for SBA Disaster Loans

Fri, 03/30/2018 - 11:03

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Director Tanya N. Garfield of the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Disaster Field Operations Center-West today reminded California small businesses of the May 1, 2018, deadline to apply for an SBA federal disaster loan for economic injury caused by the Detwiler Fire in Mariposa County that occurred July 16 – Aug. 1, 2017.

According to Garfield, small nonfarm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private nonprofit organizations of any size may apply for Economic Injury Disaster Loans of up to $2 million to help meet working capital needs caused by the disaster. “Economic Injury Disaster Loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that cannot be paid because of the disaster’s impact. Economic injury assistance is available regardless of whether the applicant suffered any property damage,” Garfield said.

These low-interest federal disaster loans are available in Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanislaus and Tuolumne counties.

The interest rate is 3.305 percent for businesses and 2.5 percent for private nonprofit organizations with terms up to 30 years. Loan amounts and terms are set by SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial condition.

Applicants may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela. Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov for more information on SBA disaster assistance. Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX  76155.

 

# # #

Governor Brown Issues Proclamation Declaring Tsunami Preparedness Week

Tue, 03/27/2018 - 11:51

SACRAMENTO – Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today issued a proclamation declaring March 26 through 30, 2018, as Tsunami Preparedness Week in the State of California.

The text of the proclamation is below:

 

Sentinel Response 18 FSE and Interagency Cooperation

Mon, 03/26/2018 - 20:36

In recent months, California and our nation has been no stranger to devastating natural and man-made emergencies. So, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) joined the California National Guard’s Homeland Response Force (HRF) and 95th Civil Support Team, along with multiple State/Federal Urban Search & Rescue Task Forces, CAL FIRE, FBI, the Department of Energy, and several other elite emergency response agencies for a full-scale terrorism response exercise at Sacramento’s Sleep Train Arena.

“In just the last year we’ve seen our highly trained emergency response and recovery teams deployed across the nation to lead critical lifesaving missions,” said Cal OES Director Mark Ghilarducci. “This exercise will test those critical rescue and response skills, as well as enhance our ability to respond to real world events that could happen anywhere in California, our nation or in other parts of the world.”

The training scenario involved a series of simultaneous terrorist attacks across Northern California following a 6.5-magnitude earthquake. The attacks include simulated improvised explosive devices (IED), the detonation of a simulated radiation-dispersal device (RDD) and firearms. Sleep Train Arena will serve as the training site for IED and RDD response, while Sonoma Raceway served as the site for active shooter response training. Hundreds of emergency-response personnel, vehicles, and aircraft participated.  Many of the first responders participating in this exercise were are part of the massive mutual aid response during the October wildfires, December wildfires and January mudslides that included more than 20,000 personnel coordinated by Cal OES.

“It’s only through regular, realistic training alongside our partner agencies that we keep our skills sharp and response times low,” said Maj. Gen. David S. Baldwin, Adjutant General for the California National Guard. “These exercises establish the relationships and interagency coordination that is fundamental to an effective response during emergency incidents.”

In this episode we pull SGM Gerald Davis, of the California National Guard, to talk about organizing such a large and complex training exercise and why they’re so important, and so important to make as real as possible.

SGM Gerald Davis, center, looking at camera

 

Click to view slideshow.

 

 

Officials to Test Tsunami Warning System in Central and Southern California During Tsunami Preparedness Week

Mon, 03/26/2018 - 17:26

NOAA and the Calif. Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) plan to conduct a test of the tsunami warning communications system on March 28 at approximately 10:15 a.m. PDT in coastal areas of central and southern California.

NOAA’s National Weather Service Offices in Monterey, Oxnard and San Diego will broadcast the “Required Monthly Test.” The test will also be broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, local television and radio stations.

Some television systems are programmed to scroll a standard emergency alert text message and in some cases, the message may not contain the word “TEST.” An audio message will say that the message is only a test, but if the volume is turned down or otherwise unheard, viewers may not realize the message is a test.

To avoid confusion with an actual alert the test will be cancelled if there is excessive seismic activity 24 hours prior to the test. People monitoring the test in coastal areas who do not receive it are asked to inform their local National Weather Service office.

The test is a cooperative effort between NOAA, Cal OES, California Broadcasters Association, and local emergency management officials in coastal California.

During California’s Tsunami Preparedness Week, March 26-30, NOAA and emergency managers promote tsunami safety and awareness and urge coastal residents and visitors to prepare themselves and their families for a tsunami. Everyone, everywhere should know how to be prepared for tsunamis and what to do to be safe. This is true for people who live or work near the ocean, and also for anyone who may visit someday. For more info visit https://www.tsunamizone.org/ which provides suggestions and resources for your family or organization to “know your zone” and to learn how to be safe. Be counted among people and organizations worldwide by registering your 2018 tsunami preparedness activities! NOAA’s National Tsunami Warning Center offers complete information, including the current status of tsunami warnings, advisories and watches, and frequently asked questions.

NOAA’s National Weather Service is the primary source of weather data, forecasts and warnings for the United States and its territories. NOAA’s National Weather Service operates the most advanced weather and flood warning and forecast system in the world, helping to protect lives and property and enhance the national economy. Working with partners, NOAA’s National Weather Service is building a Weather-Ready Nation to support community resilience in the face of increasing vulnerability to extreme weather. Visit us at weather.gov and join us on social media.

 

On the Web:

NOAA’s National Weather Service: https://www.weather.gov/

NOAA Tsunami Web sites: https://www.tsunami.noaa.gov/, https://tsunami.gov/?page=tsunamiFAQ, www.weather.gov/tsunamisafety

NOAA’s National Tsunami Warning Center: https://tsunami.gov/

Officials to Test Tsunami Warning System in Del Norte, Humboldt and Mendocino Counties During Tsunami Preparedness Week

Mon, 03/26/2018 - 14:45

NOAA and the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) plan to conduct a test of the tsunami warning communications system on Wednesday, March 28 between 11 a.m. and noon PDT in coastal areas of Northern California. This emergency test will be broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, local television and radio stations in Del Norte, Humboldt and Mendocino counties. Residents in some communities may hear warning sirens. Some television systems are programmed to scroll a standard emergency alert text message and, in some cases, the message may not contain the word “TEST.” An audio message will say that the message is only a test, but if the volume is turned down or otherwise unheard, viewers may not realize the message is a test. To avoid confusion with an actual alert the test will be canceled if there is excessive seismic activity 24 hours prior to the test. People monitoring the test in coastal areas who do not receive it are asked to inform their local National Weather Service office. This test is a cooperative effort between NOAA, Cal OES, California Broadcasters Association, and local emergency management officials in coastal areas of Northern California. During California’s Tsunami Preparedness Week, March 26-30, NOAA and emergency managers promote tsunami safety and awareness and urge coastal residents and visitors to prepare themselves and their families for a tsunami. Everyone, everywhere should know how to be prepared for tsunamis and what to do to be safe. This is true for people who live or work near the ocean, and also for anyone who may visit someday. For more information visit www.TsunamiZone.org, which provides suggestions and resources for your family or organization to “know your zone” and to learn how to be safe. Be counted among people and organizations worldwide by registering your 2018 tsunami preparedness activities.

 

Additional resources: 

Cal OES: Earthquake, Tsunami and Volcano Programs National Tsunami Preparedness Week: nws.weather.gov/nthmp/tpw/tsunami-preparedness-week.html NOAA’s National Weather Service: www.weather.gov NOAA Tsunami Web sites: www.tsunami.noaa.gov, www.nws.noaa.gov/om/tsunami NOAA’s National Tsunami Warning Center: www.tsunami.go