Aeromedical/Aviation

Spanish pilot dies in crash after National Day parade

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 12:48

By Hilary McGann

(CNN) 

A Eurofighter jet has crashed, killing its pilot, as it was returning to a military base in Spain’s southeast on Thursday, the country’s air force said. 

The aircraft had been involved in a military display in Madrid during National Day celebrations and was on the approach to the Los Llanos Air Base on the outskirts of Albacete.

“As a result of the accident, which happened while maneuvering for landing, the pilot of the aircraft has passed away,” the Spanish Air Face confirmed in a series of tweets from their official account.

First responders attended the scene on farmland near the base after receiving a call around midday local (7 a.m. ET), Reuters reported.

The cause of the crash was unclear and the Ministry of Defense has launched an investigation, the air force added.

Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy offered his condolences to the pilot’s family on Twitter and said that he was en route to the site of the accident with the Spanish Minister of Defense, Maria Dolores de Cospedal.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/10/12/europe/spanish-pilot-death/index.html

The post Spanish pilot dies in crash after National Day parade appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

NTSB Warns Pilots Of Helmet Cord Hazard

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 12:46

By Mary Grady

The NTSB issued a Safety Alert (PDF) on Wednesday aimed at pilots who wear helmets while flying that have a cord attached to the aircraft’s internal communication system. Those cords may not easily detach in the case of an emergency, the safety board has found. The board cited two accidents, both involving helicopters, when the pilot’s egress following an accident was impeded by the connecting cord. In one accident, the pilot lost control of the MD-369E while filling a water bucket at night over a lake. The helicopter hit the water and inverted, and started to sink. The pilot escaped the cockpit but found his helmet was still plugged into its port. He removed the helmet and swam to shore, with only minor injuries. A second accident ended less successfully.

In the second accident cited by the NTSB, an Airbus Helicopters MBB BO105 hit the water while flying at low altitude over a bay in snow and darkening conditions in Canada. The helicopter sank, and the pilot and passenger were able to escape from the helicopter, but the pilot died from hypothermia, and the passenger drowned. A post-accident examination of the pilot’s flight helmet revealed that the end fitting of the helmet cord was fractured where it attached to the communication port. Metal remnants showed that the cord was being pulled sideways toward the pilot’s door (as opposed to downward for release) when the fracture occurred; a post-accident test of a similar fitting required a 70-pound pull before the cord failed.

To avoid these hazards, the safety board recommends that pilots cover the issue of helmet cords in a safety briefing for passengers.  Also, the board found that the cord connecting the flight helmet to the communication system might not release readily from the port if the direction of egress is contrary to the direction needed to easily release the cord. Pilots can use a compatible intermediate cord, which connects to the communication port on one end and the cord on the other end, to facilitate a clean separation during egress. Ensure that communication cords are secured from potential snagging or entanglement with components such as flight controls, the NTSB says.

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Delta passenger claims edible marijuana made him punch flight attendant

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 12:43

Joseph Daniel Hudek IV has issued an excuse for why he lost control on a Delta flight this summer: He was high.

Hudek, who was arrested in July for trying to pry open an exit door on his flight from Seattle to China, and also for assaulting the passengers and flight attendants who tried to restrain him, told a federal magistrate judge on Tuesday that he consumed edible marijuana before the flight, which caused his outburst.

“My understanding is that it was legal to buy and consume marijuana in [Washington] state,” Hudek wrote in an affidavit, per the Tampa Bay Times. “After purchasing the edible marijuana, I ate it.”

“I have never had a remotely similar incident in all my times of flying on an airplane,” he added.

Hudek’s doctor, too, attested in an affidavit that cannabis could induce “paranoia, confusion, hallucinations and combativeness” in users.

This, along with other statements from Hudek’s friends, family and two more physicians, was evidently enough to persuade Magistrate Judge James Donohue, of Washington, to release Hudek, 23, to the custody of his mother in Tampa, reports The Seattle Times.

There’s a catch, however. Hudek is not allowed to fly back to Tampa, and must instead drive or travel by train. He is also not allowed to use marijuana.

Hudek first made headlines this summer, after causing a disturbance aboard a July 6 flight from Seattle to Beijing. Authorities say Hudek left his seat about an hour into the flight, while the plane was over the Pacific Ocean, just northwest of Vancouver Island. He then entered the restroom, exited to ask a question of the flight attendant, re-entered the restroom, and later re-emerged with his shirt off, according to documents obtained by the Tampa Bay Times. He then lunged for the exit door, screaming, “I want to get out!”

Flight attendants and passengers tried to subdue Hudek as he actively fought them off, punching a flight attendant and hitting another passenger on the head with a wine bottle. A crew member also claimed to have broken a wine bottle over Hudek’s head, which apparently didn’t faze the 23-year-old.

“Hudek did not seem impacted by the breaking of a full liter red wine bottle over his head, and instead shouted, ‘Do you know who I am?’ or something to that extent,” remembered a flight attendant shortly after the incident.

Hudek was eventually restrained by several passengers and crew. He was handed over to police at the Port of Seattle upon landing back at Seattle Tacoma International Airport, and charged with interfering with a flight crew.

Hudek is due back in court for a trial on Feb. 22, 2018. If convicted, he faces up to 20 years in prison for assault, and up to 10 years for other charges, reports The Seattle Times.

http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2017/10/12/delta-passenger-claims-edible-marijuana-made-him-punch-flight-attendant.html

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 12:41

25 Years ago today: On 13 October 1992 an Aeroflot Antonov 124 crashed into a forest near Kiev during a test flight, killing 8 of the 9 crewmembers.

Date: Tuesday 13 October 1992 Type: Antonov An-124-100 Operator: Antonov Design Bureau Registration: CCCP-82002 C/n / msn: 19530501003 First flight: 1984 Engines:Lotarev D-18T Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 9 Passengers: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 0 Total: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 9 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 1,5 km (0.9 mls) S of Kodra, Makarov District (   Ukraine) Phase: Maneuvering (MNV) Nature: Test Departure airport: Kiev-Gostomel Airport (GML/UKKM), Ukraine Destination airport: Kiev-Gostomel Airport (GML/UKKM), Ukraine

Narrative:
The third prototype of the Antonov An-124 cargo plane was destroyed when it crashed in a forest near Kodra, Ukraine. One of the nine crew members survived the accident.
The aircraft performed a certification flight out of Kiev’s Gostomel Airport. The mission for the flight was to carry out tests to determine the characteristics of controllability at maximum speed. In the test flight zone at an altitude of 5800 m (19000 feet), the crew proceeded to accelerate from 530 km/h to 650 km/h with the steering wheel completely deflected to the right. At a speed of 614 km/h, the radome disintegrated. This caused the nose to break open and separate, leading to a sudden loss of airspeed along with strong vibration and noise in the cabin. Debris was ingested in engine no. 3. The engine shut down automatically and, as a consequence, the 3rd hydraulic system failed. This, in turn, led to numerous failures of aircraft systems, including the flight management system. The crew did not get valid data about speed, altitude and angle of attack while trying to manage the emergency.
When increasing power to engines no. 2 and 4, there was a surging of engine no. 4, the air intake of which also contained fragments of the nose fairing.
The crew increased power on engine no. 1 to 58%, which led to a significant lateral slip. Control became very difficult with the aircraft oscillating. The captain instructed the engineers to leave the aircraft with parachutes. One engineer who was in the back cabin, left the aircraft through the emergency hatch. He survived with serious injuries.
The flight continued back towards Gostomel for an emergency landing. An Antonov An-22 began flying in a parallel course, helping the crew to determine their airspeed. Because the speed was much higher than the landing speed, the captain ordered to select flaps. However, due to asymmetrical release of flaps, descent rate increased. The aircraft collided with trees up to 30-40 m high, fell into a forest 43 km west of Gostomel. All the eight remaining crew members and engineers were killed.

Unconfirmed reports suggest the initial failure of the nose radome was caused by a bird strike (with the bird weighing about 1.8 kg).

The post Today in History appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

New iPhone Calls for Help Without Dialing 911

Flightsafetynet.com - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 07:43
— The Emergency S.O.S. feature on the new IOS 11 calls 911 if the sleep/wake button on the side of the phone is tapped five times.

CUPERTINO, Calif. — A new iPhone feature allows users to call for help without actually dialing 911.

WQAD reported that the feature on Apple’s IOS 11 operating system allows users to tap the sleep/wake button five times to contact emergency services.

The updated Emergency S.O.S. function tells the user to “Rapidly click the sleep/wake button five times to quickly call emergency services.”

After this, a slider bar appears after you use the feature. The slider bar allows you to slide your finger across the screen to confirm the call.

“This new feature will alert 911 and anyone else you have designated as an emergency contact. You can set your emergency contacts in the health app.”

Another feature of this iPhone update is the Touch ID is also disabled when you use Emergency S.O.S so that someone else cannot enter your device without your passcode.

To set up the feature, open the Settings App and scroll to “Emergency S.O.S.” You can switch the toggle to “Auto Call,” so that the alert goes through as soon as you make the clicks instead of waiting for you to slide your finger across the screen.

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Man Arrested for Forcing Ambulance Off Road, Assaulting EMT

Flightsafetynet.com - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 09:12

— Faisal Mohammed Alzahrani was accused of trying to stop an ambulance that was transporting his wife to a hospital.

STILLWATER, Okla. — A man was arrested after allegedly chasing down an ambulance transporting his wife and assaulting an EMT.

STW News Press reported that Faisal Mohammed Alzahrani allegedly tried to break into the ambulance, telling the EMTs that his children were crying and needed their mother.

Alzahrani allegedly “became irate” when the EMTs would not let his children ride in the ambulance. He then began following the ambulance, “driving erratically … very close to the back of the ambulance,” according to the arrest affidavit.

According to the affidavit, the EMT opened the rear door of the ambulance and motioned for Alzahrani to leave more space in between the two vehicles. Alzahrani then allegedly pulled his car in front of the ambulance, forcing it to stop. Police said he then tried to enter the ambulance and push past the EMT who was pushing him backward.

Alzahrani’s wife allegedly joined in the chaos when an EMT had Alzahrani in a headlock, causing the entire group to fall on the ground.

Alzahrani and his wife both left in his vehicle, and were later pulled over by police. Alzahrani is charged with assault and battery on an EMT and faces two years in prison if he is convicted.

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Today is Thursday the 12th of October, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 08:37

Back from a great visit to Germany and now it’s time to  get this thing back up and going! I’m not going to try catching up, just starting fresh, so here we go…

Here are the stories for today;

Be safe out there!

Tom

The post Today is Thursday the 12th of October, 2017 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Ultralight test flight ends with a crash in Gulf Park Estates

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 08:33

JACKSON COUNTY, MS (WLOX) –

A pilot was forced to make an emergency landing in a residential area of the Gulf Park Estates community after the small plane he was flying lost power.

The 911 call came in just around 10 a.m that the Ultralight plane slammed into a backyard fence on Marguerite Drive.

“I saw the plane when it flew over – you know the airport is only a couple miles from here,” Howard Mitchell said. “I heard a little noise that sounded like a tree falling. I peeped around the corner and I saw the wing.”

The pilot -James Hitterman – told police he had only been airborne in the single seat plane for about 15 minutes. He wasn’t hurt, but he also wasn’t willing to talk with WLOX News crews about the accident.

“I guess you can say that may be a freak accident, the guy said the engine just stalled on him,” Mitchell said.

Law enforcement officials say the pilot was taking the plane on a test fly because he wanted to buy it. Hitterman told police that while he was in the air, the aircraft began spluttering and spitting. He did everything he could to try to keep the plane airborne, but couldn’t keep it in the sky.

“Gotta be a good pilot. He steered it towards the fence instead of the house,” Mitchell said.

Repairing the fence will be an easy fix to something that could have potentially been a lot worse.

In order to remove the plane from the yard, crews had to dismantle it by separating the wings from the body. The FAA will conduct it’s own investigation into the cause of the crash.

http://www.wlox.com/story/36571865/ultralight-aircraft-crashes-in-gulf-park-estates

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Marines Pause CH-53 Flights in Okinawa After In-Flight Fire

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 08:32

Military.com | 12 Oct 2017 | by Hope Hodge Seck

All Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion heavy-lift helicopters based in Okinawa, Japan, will pause operations for 96 hours after one of the aircraft caught fire Wednesday and was forced to make an emergency landing.

The commanding general of III Marine Expeditionary Force, Lt. Gen. Lawrence Nicholson, ordered the pause Thursday morning.

The pause likely affects a relatively small number of aircraft; Marine Corps Air Station Futenma does not have its own heavy-lift helicopter squadron.

But CH-53s with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 462, out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California, are currently in Japan as part of the service’s rotational unit deployment program.

“We will conduct a thorough investigation working closely with aircrew and maintenance experts to determine the cause of the incident,” III MEF officials said in a statement. “We will continue to share information with the government of Japan as details become available, while understanding that the investigation must be protected and cannot be released until complete.”

Officials said Marines in Japan continue to work with local agencies to clean up the crash site and remove the aircraft.

An initial survey, they said, is underway to choose the best way to move the helicopter while minimizing damage to the surrounding environment.

The aircraft went down in a field near Okinawa’s Northern Training Area. None of the Marine crew members was injured in the crash, but the damage to the aircraft itself is unclear.

While officials said no civilians were hurt, Nicholson noted that Okinawan property had been damaged when the aircraft went down.

“This is a regrettable incident, and after the investigation is complete, those with property damage as a result of this incident will be appropriately compensated,” he said in a statement.

“I want to thank the local Japanese first responders who helped secure the scene quickly and safely, the members of 33rd Rescue Squadron who evacuated our crew members, and those moving the aircraft safely today,” Nicholson said.

“I also want to thank everyone for the concern shown for our pilots, the local community members, and their understanding of the risks both Japanese and U.S. military men and women take daily as part of our vital responsibility to provide for the defense of Japan,” he continued.

The workhorse CH-53 is one of the Corps’ most combat-worn aviation platforms and is rapidly reaching the end of its service life, with its successor — the CH-53K King Stallion — expected to begin joining squadrons as soon as next year.

A recapitalization effort begun several years ago has endeavored to keep Super Stallions flight-worthy in the meantime.

But in March 2016, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert Neller acknowledged the service “probably kept [CH-53s] in theater a little bit too long” during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, which took a toll on their condition.

http://www.military.com/daily-news/2017/10/12/marines-pause-ch-53-flights-in-okinawa-after-in-flight-fire.html

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ARFFWG NFPA ARFF TECHNICAL COMMITTEE POSITION

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 08:31

Dear ARFF Working Group Member:

As discussed during the Annual Conference, an opportunity to fulfill the  position of “Alternate”  on the NFPA ARFF Technical Committee has become available.  In order to apply for this position, please refer to the requirements below:

A One-Page Resume

A One-Page Letter stating why you want to be on the Committee

A Letter from your Department and/or Airport stating you would be financially supported for at least one meeting per year to include: travel, hotel and food expenses.

Below is some basic information regarding the NFPA ARFF Technical Committee.  You would be required to be on and be active in a Task Group

Scope

This Committee shall have primary responsibility for documents on aircraft rescue and fire-fighting services and equipment, for procedures for handling aircraft fire emergencies, and for specialized vehicles used to perform these functions at airports, with particular emphasis on saving lives and reducing injuries coincident with aircraft fires following impact or aircraft ground fires. This Committee also shall have responsibility for documents on aircraft hand fire extinguishers and accident prevention and the saving of lives in future aircraft accidents involving fire.

Responsibility

Guide for Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting Operations (NFPA 402)

Standard for Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting Services at Airports (NFPA 403)

Standard for the Recurring Proficiency of Airport Fire Fighters (NFPA 405)

Standard for Aircraft Hand Portable Fire Extinguishers (NFPA 408)

Standard for Evaluating Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting Foam Equipment (NFPA 412)

Standard for Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting Vehicles (NFPA 414)

Guide for Aircraft Accident/Incident Response Assessment (NFPA 422)

Guide for Airport/Community Emergency Planning (NFPA 424)

 

In order to be considered, the above information needs to be received by e-mail to the ARFF Working Group no later than close of business November 15, 2017.

Thank you for your continued support of the ARFF Working Group

If you have any questions or require additional information, please contact

Barbara Haas

ARFF Working Group

info@arffwg.org

972-714-9412

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The Police… At YOUR Fire (The Secret List)

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 08:29

Hey,

Please plan your schedule (and invite your local law enforcement folks to join this too) for next week…Wednesday October 18, 2017 at 1300 hours.

Respond to a fire…are you first due? Sorta. Yeah-as the FIRE Department…but….

But the fact is, our “brothers and sisters in blue” often arrive first.

Sometimes when they do, it’s a good thing.

Sometimes when they do its not such a good thing….

…if the hydrant or access is blocked by a patrol car.

…if the officers take out windows helping to ventilate.

…if the officers open doors to gain access or to investigate.

…if they do a search and become victims themselves.

While the attempts are well intentioned, the fact is that “arriving at a fire” isn’t taught at most police academies.

So now what? 

Well-how about this, invite your Firefighters, your local Police Officers and have everyone gather round the computer (you buy the snacks-purchase donuts with discretion and avoid cynicism that day-or not) and join us as Gordon Graham’s crew from LEXIPOL presents this webinar:

F I R E ! 

…..WHEN LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ARRIVE FIRST!

Wednesday October 18 at 1300-1400 hours eastern time zone. 

This program will cover specifically what Law Officers can and should do upon arrival to work collaboratively with Firefighters in doing whats best for those having the fire. The program will feature both ISFSI instructors who developed the program AND law enforcement experts. It will also provide the attendees with sample “fire operation” policy for law enforcement agencies for consideration of incorporation into their operations.

This program is specifically designed for both LAW ENFORCEMENT & FIRE SERVICE ATTENDANCE. SIGN UP NOW TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT TO JOIN IN for this interesting and what’s certain to be a lively and really valuable discussion:

http://info.lexipol.com/safe-le-ops-fireground-sl

Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On.

BillyG

The Secret List 9/29/2017-1500 Hours

www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 08:27

50 Years ago today: On 12 October 1967 a BEA DH-106 Comet broke up and crashed into the Mediterranean following a bomb explosion on board, killing 66 occupants.

Date: Thursday 12 October 1967 Time: ca. 03:25 Type: de Havilland DH-106 Comet 4 Operator: British European Airways – BEA Registration: G-ARCO C/n / msn: 6449 First flight: 1961-04-05 (6 years 6 months) Total airframe hrs: 15470 Engines:Rolls-Royce Avon 524 Crew: Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 59 / Occupants: 59 Total: Fatalities: 66 / Occupants: 66 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 35 km (21.9 mls) S off Demre, Turkey (   Mediterranean Sea) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Athens-Ellinikon International Airport (ATH/LGAT), Greece Destination airport: Nicosia Airport (NIC/LCNC), Cyprus Flightnumber: BE284

Narrative:
British European Airways flight 284 departed London-Heathrow Airport at 21:45 hours on 11 October 1967, bound for Athens, Greece and Nicosia, Cyprus.
The DH-106 Comet arrived at Athens at 01:11 hours on October 12. Six passengers disembarked and 27 passengers joined the flight. It was refuelled and serviced for the flight to Nicosia.
The aircraft taxied out at 02:27 hours and was airborne on schedule at 02:31; it was cleared by Athens Control to Nicosia on Upper Airway Red 19 to cruise at FL290. After takeoff it climbed to 4000 ft on the 180 radial of Athens VOR and then turned direct to Sounion, which it reported crossing at 02:36 hours.
At 02:46 hours, the aircraft reported that it was crossing R19B at FL290 and was estimating Rhodes at 03:03. At 03:16 hours the crew reported passing R19C at FL290 and estimated passing abeam of Myrtou, Cyprus, at 03:40 hours. This message was not received by Athens direct but was relayed by a westbound Comet aircraft. Flight 284 was then cleared by Athens to change to the Nicosia FIR frequency. Immediately after contacting Nicosia, contact was lost.
At that moment a high explosive device detonated within the cabin under seat 4A or 5A. The explosion severely damaged the aircraft causing an out-of-control condition followed by structural break-up at FL150. The wreckage fell into the sea.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The aircraft broke up in the air following detonation of a high explosive device within the cabin.”

The post Today in History appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Ex-Mayor Allegedly Steals EMT Scholarship Fund Money to Gamble

Flightsafetynet.com - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 06:12
— Nicholas Poliseno withdrew money from the Hinal Patel Scholarship Fund to gamble in Atlantic City.

SPOTSWOOD, N.J. — A former mayor was accused of stealing money from a scholarship fund honoring an EMT to gamble in Atlantic City.

NJ.com reported that Nicholas Poliseno turned himself into authorities and is facing a third-degree account of theft after allegedly withdrawing money from the Hinal Patel Scholarship Fund to gamble.

The scholarship is given to high school students every year in memory of Patel, a 22-year-old EMT who died in 2015 when a car hit the ambulance she was in. My Central Jersey reported she was working her final shift for Spotswood EMS when she died, as she was leaving to pursue her dream to become a doctor.

“It is a terribly sad situation he has put himself in,” Councilman Curtis Stollen said. “This is not an example of the fine people that do step up in our community to serve and do good things for our citizens.”

 

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Drones Deliver Defibrillators to Cardiac Arrest Patients

Flightsafetynet.com - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 19:14
— REMSA Health and Flirty Company partner to dispatch drones with portable defibrillators.

CARSON CITY, Nev. — A start-up company is partnering with an emergency health services provider to deliver portable defibrillators to cardiac arrest victims via drones.

CNBC reported that Flirtey, a company that has delivered orders by drone for Domino’s and 7-Eleven, teamed up with REMSA Health to develop a plan to dispatch drones equipped with portable defibrillators whenever symptoms of cardiac arrest are reported to 911 dispatchers.

REMSA’s chief of health care operations J.W. Hodge said the goal is to help patients quicker than an ambulance.

“Many communities have done a good job of deploying defibrillators, so you will have them on airplanes, in some office buildings and schools and so on,” Hodge said. “Yet they’re not always within reach. 

At the same time, every minute someone suffers cardiac arrest without some intervention like CPR or an electrical shock, their chance of survival dips 10 percent.”

Flirtey CEO Matthew Sweeny said the portable defibrillators can be used by anyone and weigh about 5 pounds. The drone will lower them down on a line so a bystander can unbox it and follow instructions on how to use it.

Sweeny said the program will start in Nevada because they are an FAA-approved drone test site.

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Police Identify EMT Killed in Ambulance Crash

Flightsafetynet.com - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 15:55
— Marina DeSteno Challeen, 24, died after the ambulance she was riding in struck a stalled semi.

BROOKLYN CENTER, Minn. — Police identified the EMT who died Monday while riding in an ambulance that crashed into a stalled semi. 

Minnesota State Troopers identified the EMT as 24-year-old Marina DeSteno Challeen.

HealthEast, the owner of the ambulance, released a statement about the incident.

“Last evening, there was a tragic motor vehicle collision that involved one of our HealthEast ambulances. We lost a valued member of our HealthEast Medical Transportation Team. As we work with law enforcement to understand what happened, we ask for thoughts and prayers for our colleague, grieving family and friends and our team. The families involved are asking for privacy during this time.”

DeSteno Challeen’s family said she was an aspiring med student who wanted to work for Doctors Without Borders, according to KSTP.

“She was kind of a tough kid. She was independent and did things her own way,” DeSteno Challeen’s aunt, Nancy DeSteno, said. “She worked hard at reaching out to people. If she realized someone was upset. She would come up to you and put her arm around you and be close. You know? She was very good at that.”

 

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Update: Salt Lake Police Officer Fired After Nurse Wubbel Incident

Flightsafetynet.com - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:29

SALT LAKE CITY – Following the controversial arrest of a University of Utah nurse, one detective has been fired, and a Lieutenant has been demoted.

Detective Jeff Payne and Lt. James Tracy came under public scrutiny in July after they arrested Alex Wubbels, who refused to conduct a blood draw on an unconscious patient to help with a police investigation.

According to a notice of employment termination, the Salt Lake City Police Department stated that Payne violated numerous police policies, and “dramatically undermined public respect.”

“Based on the strong and compelling evidence as set forth above, I have lost faith and confidence in your ability to continue to serve as a member of the Salt Lake City Police Department,” Salt Lake City Police Chief Mike Brown said.

The decision comes after an internal affairs investigation and citizen review board. Both entities sustained findings of policy violations in the incident.

On Tuesday evening, Wubbels and her attorney Karra Porter responded to the news of the firing.

“I owe it to the body camera footage to really tell the story of what happened,” Wubbels said.

She left the rest of the statements to Porter, saying, “I currently don’t feel the emotional capacity to really speak to the allegations, or the statement that Chief Brown put out.”

Porter said she was pleased with Chief Brown’s decision.

“I do feel some relief, frankly, that Detective Payne was terminated,” she said. She said she hopes there are lessons that will be learned from the incident.

“I don’t see any way that someone thinks they can behave like that, and go out there and interact with the public,” she said.

Wubbels is still considering filing a lawsuit, Porter said, and they’ll make a decision later this month.

More details available at Fox13 Salt Lake City.

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Today is Friday the 6th of October, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 06:34

I’m in Munich, Germany for the next few days with the wife and some friends, so ignore the bizarre time differences!

We close out this week with the following stories.

Have a safe weekend,

Auf Wiedersehen!

Tom

 

The post Today is Friday the 6th of October, 2017 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Bardstown man dies after experimental plane crashes near airport

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 06:29

NC GAZETTE / WBRT RADIO
STAFF REPORT

The plane that crashed Thursday evening was a BC Ultra Pup similar to the aircraft shown above.

Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 — A Bardstown man was killed Thursdaay evening in the crash of an experimental plane on the north end of the Samuels Field airport runway. Police, Nelson County Fire and Nelson County EMS were dispatched at 6:26 p.m. when the crash was reported.

The plane came to rest near the farm of Kent and Holly Bishcoff off Ben Irvin Road. The airport manager contacted Nelson County Dispatch to confirm a plane had crashed off the end of the runway.

The plane that crashed was a homebuilt experimental plane owned and flown by the Bardstown man who died in the crash, John Hall, 68, of Bardstown. According to the plane’s registration, the plane was a 2013 Bryant C. Crosby BC Ultra Pup single-engine aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted to investigate the accident.

http://nelsoncountygazette.com/?p=33809

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Airplane crashes onto field just outside Santa Ynez Airport after losing power

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 06:27

A single-engine airplane lost power while taking off and crashed into a field just outside of the Santa Ynez Airport on Thursday morning.

At about 10:43 a.m., Santa Barbara County Fire responded to the Santa Ynez Airport for a report of a downed plane. When units arrived, they found a single-engine aircraft with just one pilot on board and no other passengers, according to County Fire Capt. Dave Zaniboni.

The plane reportedly lost power while taking off and crashed through a barbed wire fence, ending up on a field at the west end of the airport, Zaniboni said. The pilot was able to self-extricate and suffered no injuries; however, the plane incurred some damage and had a small fuel leak.

Crews remained on scene attempting to unload the fuel from the aircraft and stop the leak, Zaniboni added.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration were notified and will work to tow the aircraft away from the field and back into the hangar at the airport.

http://santamariatimes.com/news/local/airplane-crashes-onto-field-just-outside-santa-ynez-airport-after/article_59e6b505-355a-524e-aa01-99c4a7244daa.html

The post Airplane crashes onto field just outside Santa Ynez Airport after losing power appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Small plane crashes upon landing at airport in Hillsboro; 2 injured

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 06:26

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) – Two men who were in a small plane suffered non-life-threatening injuries after a crash landing at an airport in Hillsboro.

The 1963 Piper 250 Comanche single-engine plane crash landed on Thursday. Piloting it was 39-year-old John Gorman. He and 68-year-old flight instructor Ronald Magnus are expected to be OK.

Washington County sheriff’s spokesman Sgt. Bob Ray said the plane came up short during the landing and hit the edge of the runway, and then went back up before hitting the runway again hard.

Ray said Gorman is a licensed pilot and was working toward an advanced certification at the time of the crash.

http://www.kgw.com/news/local/small-plane-crashes-upon-landing-at-hillsboro-airport/481124713

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