Aeromedical/Aviation

Ohio High Schoolers Go After EMT Certification

Flightsafetynet.com - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 16:33

— A new partnership between schools and first responders allows students to pursue EMS careers right out of high school.

TOLEDO, Ohio — A new partnership will allow Ohio high school seniors to gain their EMT certification while finishing high school.

Gov Tech reported that the partnership between Toledo Public Schools, police and fire departments, Owens Community College and ProMedica will allow high school seniors to be a full-time EMT students while finishing their senior year.

Superintendent Romules Durant told the 40 seniors who will kick off the program that the EMT certification will give them the ability to pursue a career or higher education in the medical field right out of high school.

“Once you complete, you will be certified and you can truly say, ‘I am career-ready. Because I have a certification that allows me to be employed within the sector of EMT,’” Durant said.

Students will learn the necessary skills for the EMS field while taking regular high school classes twice a week, and tuition will be covered by the school district’s College Credit Plus program.

They will also spend time in ProMedica’s clinical sites for hands-on experience, and be able to interview with ProMedica for possible employment after they are certified.

“It’s going to challenge you mentally, physically, and emotionally. It’s a lot of work, but it’s very rewarding,” Owens’ criminal justice and emergency services chair Mark King said. “You will be job-ready when you graduate.”

City councilmember Cecelia Adams said she’s been working with Toledo’s first responders for two years to get the program started.

“Now we have a pipeline for young people who can come and work in our city and be firefighters and police officers,” she said.

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Second Spanish jet pilot dies in five days when F-18 crashes following fatal accident after last week’s military display in Madrid

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 07:36
  • Fernando Pérez Serrano, 26, died when F-18 jet crashed at Madrid airbase
  • Spanish Air Force pilot’s jet went down during take-off at Torrejon de Ardoz
  • Crash took place just five days after another fighter jet crash in Madrid
  • Pilot crashed in Albacete south of Madrid returning from a military display

By Gerard Couzens and Sara Malm for MailOnline

A Spanish Air Force pilot had died after F-18 jet crashed near and airbase in Madrid on Tuesday morning. 

Lieutenant Fernando Pérez Serrano, 26, suddenly crashed to the ground as the F-18 fighter jet was taking off from Torrejon de Ardoz airbase around 11am local time.

Mr Pérez Serrano is the second Spanish Air Force pilot to die in Madrid in five days, after another fatal accident after a military display on Thursday.

Firefighters stationed at the air base are leading the emergency response, and video posted on social media shows thick plumes of black smoke rising from the crash scene.

Mr Pérez Serrano joined the air force in 2009 and had logged more than 700 flight hours, Spanish media reports.

The reason for the fatal crash is not yet known, but an engine failure has been listed as the likely cause.

According to El Pais, mechanics had warned that the engine was making ‘a strange noise’ before takeoff.

The Spanish Ministry of Defence confirmed the fatal incident in a tweet, writing: ‘As a result of the accident, which happened as the plane was taking off, the pilot has died.’

It added in a second message: ‘The Air Force is investigating the causes of the accident, which at the moment are unknown.’  

Today’s accident comes just five days after a Spanish Air Force Eurofighter crashed near a public park in Albacete south of Madrid as it returned from a military display.

The pilot Borja Aybar, whose wife and young baby were waiting for him at the air base he was preparing to land at nearby, died.

Cristiano Ronaldo was said to keep a Gulfstream G200 he bought at Torrejon de Ardoz so he could visit Moroccan kick boxer friend Badr Hari.

David Beckham also used to fly in and out of the air base, a commercial airport which operates as a joint-use facility between the Spanish Ministry of Defence and the Ministry of Public Works, when he played for Real Madrid.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4988502/Second-Spanish-jet-pilot-dies-five-days-F-18-crash.html

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Air Force cargo plane makes emergency landing in Reno

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 07:33

RENO — A military transport plane on a mountain training mission made a safe emergency landing Monday at Reno-Tahoe International Airport after experiencing a problem with its landing gear shortly after takeoff.

The U.S. Air Force C-130 with 14 people on board the plane circled the airport for more than a half hour to burn off fuel before making an emergency landing about 10:40 a.m.

No one was hurt. Crews are inspecting the aircraft.

Nevada Air National Guard spokesman Emerson Marcus says the plane is based at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama. It was temporarily based at the Nevada Air Guard headquarters at the Reno airport as part of an assignment with the Advanced Mountain Airlift Tactics School.

Officials at Maxwell Air Force Base did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The mountain training often includes flights along the Sierra Nevada and northern Nevada’s high desert in areas resembling parts of Afghanistan.

Air Force cargo plane makes emergency landing in Reno

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Emergency services greet Flybe plane at Dublin Airport amid smell of fumes in cockpit

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 07:32

The plane from Cardiff, which had 75 on board, has landed safely but the initial scene sparked concern among eyewitness

By John Shammas

A FLYBE plane has been greeted by emergency service workers at Dublin Airport after crew staff smelt fumes in the cockpit.

The plane from Cardiff, which had 75 on board, has landed safely but the initial scene sparked concern among eyewitness.

One eyewitness tweeted: “Incident command unit, police on the runway at Dublin. Beside plane that just arrived from Cardiff.

“What’s going on?”

Dublin Airport tweeted: “Airport Police responding to an aircraft in difficulty which subsequently landed safely.”

Flybe said in a statement: “Flybe confirms that the captain of the above flight took the necessary precautionary action after the crew detected a smell of fumes.

“The aircraft landed safely as normal in Dublin.

“All 75 passengers disembarked without further incident when the aircraft arrived on stand with no reports of any adverse passenger reaction.

“As is normal in such circumstances the airport placed its emergency vehicles on standby.

“The safety of its passengers and crew is the airline’s number one priority and Flybe apologises for any inconvenience experienced.”

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/4692623/emergency-services-greet-flybe-plane-at-dublin-airport-with-reports-of-smell-of-fumes-in-cockpit/

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A Drone Crashed Into an Airplane in Quebec

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 07:30

By Jonathan Vanian

For the first time in Canada’s history, a drone has hit a commercial airplane.

Canada’s minister of transport, Marc Garneau, revealed this weekend that a drone struck a SkyJet Airlines plane while it was nearing the Jean Lesage International Airport in Québec City.

“This is the first time a drone has hit a commercial aircraft in Canada,” Garneau said in a statement, “and I am extremely relieved that the aircraft only sustained minor damage and was able to land safely.”

There were no injuries to the eight passengers on board the plane, according to a report by the CBC, Canada’s public broadcaster.

Garneau elaborated on the drone incident during a press conference. The official said that the accident would have been “much more serious” if the drone smashed into the plane’s cockpit or engine.

“It’s important to note that aircraft are particularly vulnerable when on final approach coming in—the pilot is concentrating on landing properly,” Garneau said at the press conference.

Like the United States, Canadian hobbyists are not allowed to fly their drones in restricted areas like airports. Garneau said in a statement that concerns over drone incidents prompted Canadian lawmakers to issue interim drone guidelines that restrict their use.

Some of these drone guidelines are similar to U.S.’s Federal Aviation Administration’s rules, including not allowing hobbyists to fly their drones beyond the line of sight of their operators or at night.

Garneau did not say if Canada’s transportation agency has determined who the drone pilot was or if it intends to punish the person. He said in his statement that anyone who violates the country’s drone rules “could be subject to fines of up to $25,000 and/or prison.”

“Transport Canada is monitoring the situation and is in contact with its transportation partners including Skyjet, the Jean Lesage International Airport and NAV CANADA [Canada’s air traffic organization],” Garneau said. “My department is in contact with the Service de police de la Ville de Québec and we will cooperate with the Transportation Safety Board should they decide to investigate.”

The drone accident comes after the Canadian company Drone Delivery Canada said last week that it’s been approved by Canadian regulators to test a commercial drone delivery system in northern Canada. The company wants to use drones to deliver mail and supplies to rural areas in the country without roads and create a sort-of “railway in the sky.”

Although companies like Amazon are excited about the potential to use drones to deliver goods, accidents like the one at the Quebec airport are likely to throw a monkey wrench in getting these big delivery projects off the ground. Both drone rules in the U.S. and in Canada are still in a state of flux, and until they get ironed out to meet the specific needs of companies as well as residents, it’s likely widespread deliveries will not occur as fast as expected.

http://fortune.com/2017/10/16/drone-airplane-quebec-collision/

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 07:29

29 Years ago today: On 17 October 1988 a Uganda Airlines Boeing 707 crashed on approach to Rome, Italy, killing 33 out of 52 occupants.

Date: Monday 17 October 1988 Time: 00:30 Type: Boeing 707-338C Operator: Uganda Airlines Registration: 5X-UBC C/n / msn: 19630/746 First flight: 1968 Total airframe hrs: 57776 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT3D-3B Crew: Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 26 / Occupants: 45 Total: Fatalities: 33 / Occupants: 52 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 1 km (0.6 mls) SE of Roma-Fiumicino Airport (FCO) (   Italy) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: London-Gatwick Airport (LGW/EGKK), United Kingdom Destination airport: Roma-Fiumicino Airport (FCO/LIRF), Italy Flightnumber: 775

Narrative:
The aircraft took off from London-Gatwick (LGW) at 21:10 UTC on a flight to Rome (FCO) and Entebbe (EBB) . During descent to Rome, clearance was received for a descent to 4000 feet in preparation for an ILS approach to runway 16L. Visibility was deteriorating with RVR values of 400 m (point Alfa), 1000 m (point Bravo) and 350 m (point Charlie). A missed approach procedure was carried out at 00:05. A second approach was attempted, this time to runway 25. This was also abandoned due to poor visibility. RVR values for runway 34L (1600 m, 2000 m and 150 m resp. at Alfa, Bravo and Charlie) made the crew request radar vectoring to runway 34L. The aircraft was established on the localizer at 00:28. The aircraft continued to descend below the 420 feet MDA, although the runway visual markings hadn’t been located. Because the flight crew failed to use the indispensable altitude callouts, the GPWS sounded unexpectedly.
The aircraft impacted the roof of a house 1300 m short of the runway, 100 m right of the extended centreline. It continued and impacted another building 85 m further on. The Boeing then broke up and burst into flames.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The crew’s lack of adequate preparation in the procedure for a Non Precision Approach on runway 34L at Fiumicino Airport, especially in the matter of crew coordination and altitude callouts and their continued descent beyond MDA without having located the runway visual markings.
Besides, the following factors may have contributed to the cause of the accident:
1) Presumed mental and physical fatigue, accumulated by the crew during the two previous landing approaches, which were also carried out in an environmental situation that was extremely unfavourable and operationally demanding.;
2) A configuration of the Altitude Instruments, which although sufficient for the approaches that were carried out, consisted of a single radio altimeter with the acoustic warning of the MDA crossing inoperative;
3) The attention of the crew was excessively concentrated on the luminous sources along runway 34L, instead of on the instrument readings.
Furthermore (…) part of the Board of Inquiry as well as the representative of the Ugandan CA, disassociated themselves from the majority, during the phase of identifying the factors that may have contributed to causing the accident.”

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1 Dead, 2 Hurt after Ambulance Drives Off Bridge

Flightsafetynet.com - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 07:22
— First Responders have been called to a crash involving an ambulance in Saginaw county.

SAGINAW COUNTY, Mich. — Two paramedics are in critical condition and one man is dead after an ambulance crash Monday.

The accident happened at 6:25 a.m. Monday, Oct. 16  on Gary Road near Lincoln Road on the border between Maple Grove and Albee Townships.

WNEM reported that the ambulance went through a stop sign and crashed into a car, causing the ambulance to go off a bridge and fall 30 feet into a creek.

Police said the two paramedics in the ambulance and the driver of the vehicle were all transported to the hospital, where the driver of the vehicle later died.

The paramedics both suffered critical injuries and hypothermia from the water; their names have not been released.

Police said they are investigating whether fog played a factor in the crash.

“A Mobile Medical Response ambulance was involved in a collision early this morning at the corner of Lincoln and Gary roads in Maplegrove Township,” a Mobile Medical Response spokesperson said. “At this time, Michigan State Police remain on scene completing their investigation. MMR is cooperating fully with authorities. There are no other details available for release at this time.”

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Today is Monday the 16th of October, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:35

We start the new week with the following stories…

Have a good week, be safe out there!

Tom

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Chief Alan Brunacini – Rest in Peace (The Secret List)

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:29

FIRE SERVICE LEGEND, MENTOR & FRIEND, CHIEF ALAN BRUNACINI PASSES WAY

The Secret List www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com 

It is with profound grief and sadness that the Brunacini Family advises of the untimely passing of Chief Alan Brunacini. He passed away suddenly this afternoon.

At the request of the family, please allow them time to deal with this terrible loss-arrangements will be shared soon.

Simply put-there is not a Firefighter in North America-and quite possibly the world, that hasn’t been positively influenced by “Chief Bruno” – we are all in debt to this wonderful man.

Rest In Peace Chief Alan Brunacini and our heartfelt condolences to his family and friends.

Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On.

BillyG

The Secret List 10/15/2017-1845 Hours

www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

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Passengers hit out at AirAsia for its response to mid-air drama on board Perth to Bali flight QZ535

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:22

Liam Croy

AirAsia passengers have criticised the airline for what they claim was a chaotic response to a midair scare that forced them to return to Perth Airport.

Flight QZ535 was 25 minutes into its journey to Bali when cabin crew announced there was an emergency and oxygen masks dropped from overhead compartments.

The aircraft began a dramatic descent from its cruising altitude, with passengers claiming they were told there had been a loss in cabin pressure.

Passengers claimed attendants added to the panic.

Merv Loy said the only instructions they received in English were to put their seatbelts on and “Brace”.

“We didn’t understand a word they were saying. It was pretty scary,” he said.

Glenyce Regan started praying as the woman next to her scribbled in a notepad through tears.

“I could feel (the loss of pressure) from breathing because I’ve not long ago had a heart operation,” Ms Regan said. “Then the masks dropped and it frightened the s… out of me.

“It (the advice) was all in Asian or Thai or something. We couldn’t understand anything that was coming over the loudspeaker.

“I instantly grabbed my rosary beads and put them around my neck.

“I thought we were gone. I really, really thought we were gone. My life flashed in front of me.”

Mark Bailey said some on the plane assumed the worst because of the crew’s “hysterical” reaction.

One woman told The West Australian she thought they were about to “crash-land in a paddock”.

Passengers rushed to put on lifejackets despite the lack of water below them.

“(The attendants) were screaming their heads off,” Mr Bailey said. “We lost cabin pressure.

Degi Chimedlkham, who was on the flight with her elderly mother, also criticised the crew’s handling of the emergency.

Her mother thought there was a terrorist on the plane.

“Who are the people supposed to be taking care of us? The flight attendants, right? They scared us most,” Ms Chimedlkham said.

Danielle Wilkie was hugging her daughter, Katie Macguire, 13, who had complained of ear pain and shortness of breath just before the commotion.

“I had my daughter cradled, saying ‘I love you. I love you’,” Ms Wilkie said.

An AirAsia spokesman said the plane had to return to Perth because of a technical issue which was being investigated.

The scare comes four months after another AirAsia flight was forced to return to Perth because of an engine failure.

During that incident the pilot urged passengers to say a prayer.

https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/passengers-hit-out-at-airasia-for-its-response-to-mid-air-drama-on-board-perth-to-bali-flight-qz535-ng-b88629374z

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180 passengers evacuated from Cebu Pacific plane at Iloilo airport

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:18

Cebu Pacific Flight 5J 461 on Friday night made an emergency evacuation of passengers soon after the jet plane landed at the Iloilo International Airport. 

In a Twitter advisory, Cebu Pacific said the passengers were all accounted for and safe and  being attended to by airport personnel.

It did not give details about the emergency incident.

But the company promised: “We will provide updates as soon as possible.”

“On or about 1115pm on 13 October 2017 (Friday) an incident occurred involving Flight 5J 461 (Manila-Iloilo) upon landing at the Iloilo International Airport. The flight was carrying 180 passengers,” the Twitter post said.

It added: “The crew initiated emergency evacuation. All passengers are accounted for and are safe. They are being attended to by airport personnel.”

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/937818/breaking-philippine-news-updates-airplane-accidents-cebu-pacific-cebu-pacific-flight-5j-461-the-iloilo-international-airport

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River Search Continues After Small Plane Crash Kills at Least 1 in Anoka

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:15

At least one woman is dead after a small airplane hit a power line and crashed on the Mississippi River between Champlin and Anoka Friday evening.  

Lt. Brent Erickson of the Anoka County Sheriff’s Office said the single-engine Cessna took a nosedive when the pilot hit the power line and lost control of the plane.

The Federal Aviation Authority originally told the sheriff’s office that at least three people were in the aircraft when it went into the water, but Erickson later said they did not know how many people were in the plane.

Some witnesses boarded a personal pontoon and pulled the woman from the water, but she was pronounced dead at the scene.

One witness said he saw a bright flash before the plane hit the water hard.

LeRoy Kesler said the plane split into pieces and lost a wing before crashing.

“There were about three or four pieces floating down the river,” Kesler said. He added that no one appeared to escape the plane after it hit the water.

Another witness, Jeremy Scott, said he was at Mississippi River Community Park in Anoka when he saw the Cessna flying 20 or 30 feet above the water.

“I saw the guy in the airplane, and about five or 10 minutes later I started hearing sirens,” Scott said. “I thought he was taking scientific measurements. There wasn’t any sputtering. He wasn’t gliding and the engine was running, but he looked very serious.”

Erickson said authorities had recovered a few pieces of debris and knew the location of the plane, but dive teams may have a difficult time with recovery due to unusually high waters and a rapid current on the river.

The National Transportation Safety Board will also send a representative to the area Saturday. Several law enforcement agencies will be investigating the incident.

The Anoka-Champlin Fire Department, a Minnesota State Patrol helicopter and other first responders were at the scene of the crash, which was reported just before 5:45 p.m.

Connexus Energy said more than 500 customers were without power near the area of the crash, and Chopper 5 video showed multiple downed power lines.

http://kstp.com/news/small-plane-crash-reported-on-mississippi-river-near-champlin/4634795/

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Small plane crashes into field northwest of Fort Collins

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:12

LARIMER COUNTY, Colo. — No one was injured after a plane crashed into a field northwest of Fort Collins on Friday morning, the Poudre Fire Authority said.

The crash happened just before 11 a.m. north of U.S. 287 and North Overland Trail Road, officials said.

The plane ended on its roof and several emergency responders were at the scene after people reported the plane was in distress.

The pilot was the only person on board the plane, an experimental aircraft called a Murphy Rebel, and was not injured. The name and age of the pilot weren’t released.

It’s not known where the plane originated or where it was going.

A hazardous materials crew was brought in to stop a fuel leak from the plane.

The cause of the crash is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

http://kdvr.com/2017/10/13/small-plane-crashes-into-field-northwest-of-fort-collins/

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Cargo plane crashes off Ivory Coast, killing 4

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:10

By Eric DuVall

Oct. 14 (UPI) — A cargo plane carrying French military cargo crashed in the waters off the Ivory Coast killing four people and injuring six others, police said.

Witnesses said the turboprop plane crashed into water not far from the main airport in Ivory Coast’s capital Abidjan. Officials said the four dead were Moldovans. Four French nationals and two other Moldovans survived.

Witnesses said the plane went down during a heavy thunderstorm, though it was unclear whether the conditions played a role in the crash or if the plane was experiencing mechanical problems.

Cellphone video from the crash site showed the wreckage washed up on a beach, where police and civilians rushed to try to haul out victims and the bodies of the dead.

Voice of America said the plane had been chartered by the French military to support Operation Barkhead, an anti-jihadi military operation in Africa. The flight originated in Burkina Faso and was headed to a French military base in Abidjan at the time of the crash.

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2017/10/14/Cargo-plane-crashes-off-Ivory-Coast-killing-4/2091508019486/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=2

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:09

4 Years ago today: On 16 October 2013 a Lao Airlines ATR-72-600 crashed near Pakse Airport when the crew lost situational awareness during the approach, killing all 49 on board.

Date: Wednesday 16 October 2013 Time: 15:55 Type: ATR 72-212A (ATR-72-600) Operator: Lao Airlines Registration: RDPL-34233 C/n / msn: 1071 First flight: 2013-03-06 (7 months) Total airframe hrs: 758 Engines:Pratt & Whitney Canada PW127M Crew: Fatalities: 5 / Occupants: 5 Passengers: Fatalities: 44 / Occupants: 44 Total: Fatalities: 49 / Occupants: 49 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 8 km (5 mls) NW of Pakse Airport (PKZ) (   Laos) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Vientiane-Wattay Airport (VTE/VLVT), Laos Destination airport: Pakse Airport (PKZ/VLPS), Laos Flightnumber: 301

Narrative:
A Lao Airlines ATR-72 was damaged beyond repair in an accident near Pakse, Laos. All 44 passengers and five crew members were killed in the accident.
Flight QV301 originated in Vientiane, Laos at 14:45 and operated a domestic service to Pakse. Weather in the area was poor as a result of a passing typhoon.
The flight was cleared for a VOR-DME non-precision approach to runway 15. After passing the final approach fix, the procedure called for a descent to the minimum descent altitude of 990 feet. After this the approach may only be continued if ground visual references are available.
The crew however incorrectly set the altitude preselect (ALT SEL) mode to 600 feet. This was still below the (incorrectly) published height of 645 feet on their Jeppesen chart.
Since the ground was not visible at 600 feet, the crew disconnected the autopilot and aborted the approach with the intention to conduct a missed approach.
After the aborted approach, the Flight Director vertical mode switched to Go Around and immediately went into altitude capture mode because the altitude selected was 600 feet. The missed approach was followed by a right turn instead of a nominal climb as published in the VOR-DME approach chart. The airplane began losing altitude.
A series of EGPWS warnings sounded and the height reached the minimum value of 60 feet above ground level and the roll reached approximately 37° to the right.
When the flight crew realized that the altitude was too close to the ground, the captain over-reacted, which led to a high pitch attitude of 33°. The Flight Director command bars then disappeared from the screen because of the extreme aircraft position.
The airplane climbed to an altitude of 1750 feet until the airplane pitched down again. The Flight Director command bars then reappeared and centered during the descent, because the selected altitude was still 600 feet.
The descent was continued until the airplane impacted the Mekong River. The fuselage broke and sank in the river.

Probable Cause:

Causes of the Accident:
The probable cause of this accident were the sudden change of weather condition and the flight crew’s failure to properly execute the published instrument approach, including the published missed approach procedure, which resulted in the aircraft impacting the terrain.
The following factors may have contributed to the accident:
– The flight crew’s decision to continue the approach below the published minima
– The flight crew’s selection of an altitude in the AL T SEL window below the minima, which led to misleading FD horizontal bar readings during the go-around
– Possible Somatogravic illusions suffered by the PF
– The automatic reappearance of the FD crossbars consistent with the operating logic of the aeroplane systems, but inappropriate for the go-around
– The inadequate monitoring of primary flight parameters during the go-around, which may have been worsened by the PM’s attention all tunneling on the management of the aircraft flap configuration
– The flight crew’s limited coordination that led to a mismatch of action plans between the PF and the PM during the final approach.

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Fallen EMTs Coworker Contacts ‘Flash’ TV Stars for Funeral

Flightsafetynet.com - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 16:50
— Since she was a big fan, Marina DeSteno Challeen’s partner wants to bring the Flash costume to her funeral.

BROOKLYN CENTER, Minn. — A fallen EMT’s partner wants to do something special for her funeral by contacting TV stars.

KSTP reported that Marino DeSteno Challeen’s partner, Eric Morcos, became friends with her while they worked together for eight months.

“I was with her around the time her mom passed away and so I helped bury her mom and go through all that. It was a rough time,” Morcos said. “The family has just been having a hard time lately.”

EMT DeSteno Challeen was killed when the ambulance she was in collided with a stalled semi. At the time of the crash, Morcos said he was on his way to the station to work out when his wife called him to tell him about seeing a HealthEast ambulance crash on TV.

“Called Marina, it went right to voicemail. I texted her, ‘Are you OK?'” he said.

Morcos knew that DeSteno Challeen loved dressing up as her favorite comic book character, Flash, so he wants to plan something special for her funeral.

“I honestly don’t think there’s anybody in the world who’s a bigger fan of the Flash than her, if we could get the costume from either the new Flash or the TV show,” he said.

Morcos reached out to “Flash” actors Ezra Miller and Grant Gustin in the hopes that they could help him out.

He knows there’s no guarantee that they will respond, but he said it was DeSteno Challeen who taught him to look at the bright side of things.

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Today is Friday the 13th of October, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 12:54

Friday the 13th, hmmm….

Here are the stories to finish off the week;

Have a great weekend and be safe out there!

Tom

The post Today is Friday the 13th of October, 2017 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

2 men killed in plane crash north of Las Cruces International Airport

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 12:51

Las Cruces, NM – ABC-7’s New Mexico Mobile Newsroom has learned two men were killed in a plane crash north of the Las Cruces International Airport.

Investigators identified the men killed as 67-year-old David Glenn Hancock of El Paso and 77-year-old Morris Douglas Newton of Las Cruces.

NMSP spokesman Carl Christiansen said the two victims were the only occupants of the single-engine plane.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are at the scene.

Las Cruces Police said Thursday night the fixed wing plane crashed over rough terrain. State police, Border Patrol, and the Dona Ana County Sheriff’s Office initially responded to the scene.

Rescue crews had to use all-terrain vehicles to reach the crash site in a canyon. The site was spotted by an Air National Guard helicopter crew.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford told the Associated Press a post-crash fire destroyed the aircraft.

http://www.kvia.com/news/new-mexico/2-men-killed-in-plane-crash-north-of-las-cruces-international-airport/636981179

The post 2 men killed in plane crash north of Las Cruces International Airport appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

No one injured in plane crash in Polk County

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 12:50

A Tennessee pilot and a passenger was unharmed after his small plane went off the side of the runway and onto a grassy slope at Cornelius Moore Field in Polk County today.

According to airport manager Sam Branch, pilot Kourosh Shokoui of Cookeville, Tenn., was coming into land in Polk County today when his de Havilland DHC-1 was caught up by a condition known as a “ground loop” and went off the side of the runway and down an embankment and caught fire shortly after it came to a stop.

Shokoui and a passenger made it out of the plane without any injuries, Branch said. He was still waiting on FAA representatives to take a report on Thursday afternoon.

Cedartown Fire and Rescue and the Polk County Fire Department both responded to the incident and were able to extinguish the fire.

The plane is expected to be a total loss. There were no further incidents involved in the crash today.

He said the airport’s runway was closed for 45 minutes while crews worked to extinguish the flames.

The DHC-1, commonly referred to as a “Chipmunk,” is a two-seater, single-engine plane built by a Canadian firm.

It was caught up in a condition known as a “ground loop,” which Branch explained was when one wing is picked up by the lift of air, while another is pushed down and dips, causing the plane to rapidly turn.

http://www.northwestgeorgianews.com/polk_standard_journal/news/local/no-one-injured-in-plane-crash-in-polk-county/article_66d2e310-af80-11e7-ac2f-6ff717fb10ab.html

The post No one injured in plane crash in Polk County appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

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