State - CA (California)

Solar Eclipse 2017: What You Need To Know

State - California - CALOES - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 16:14

On Monday, August 21, a solar eclipse will pass over all 50 United States for the first time since 1979. In California, the moon will cover from 60% – 90% of the sun, depending on where you view the eclipse.

In this week’s Quick Look, we show you the best and safest way to view the eclipse, and also let you know when the peak time will take place here in California.

You can view our Solar Eclipse story on our YouTube page here.

You can also find out more information about the eclipse on NASA’s official eclipse page here.

Identify Tree Mortality By Colorful Forests

State - California - CALOES - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 14:21

California’s ongoing battle with bark beetle infestations and tree mortality has taken a colorful turn. Caltrans is marking all dead and dying trees with orange paint to correctly and efficiently identify hazardous trees that could impact the safety of travelers along the state highway.

To prevent dead and dying trees from falling toward the roadway and blocking traffic or causing injury and damage, Caltrans will paint identified trees and then quickly begin the next phase of cutting and removing.

Marked trees along highways may be on federal, state, county or private property, thus written permission must be provided by property owners before Caltrans can proceed. There is no cost to the property owner.

However, if a property owner does not respond to the “Permission to Enter” form, or denies permission, the hazardous trees will not be removed and the owner is responsible for any future damage.

Tree mortality has already stripped the state of more than 100 million dead trees, with that total expected to climb when the next survey numbers are released, likely in November.

The Tree Mortality Task Force, which is comprised of state and federal agencies, local governments, utilities and various stakeholders, coordinates emergency protective actions and monitors ongoing conditions to address the vast tree mortality resulting from unprecedented drought and the resulting bark beetle infestations across large regions of the state.

Governor Edmund G. Brown rescinded the drought state of emergency order, excluding four counties, in April in the wake of one of the wettest winters in state history. Only Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Tuolumne counties remain in a drought emergency.

Still, tree mortality is a long-term issue. By comparison, more than 830 million trees have died in Colorado during a decade-long bout with tree mortality.

Click here to learn more about Caltrans’ hazardous tree identification process.

 

Additional resources:

Cal OES

Cal OES Recovery Division

Cal FIRE

Tree Mortality Task Force

Caltrans

Modoc July Complex Dominated by Pyro Plumes and Fire Weather

State - California - CALOES - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 17:29

Lightning activity caused 104 wildfires on the Modoc National Forest beginning July 23, 2017.  Two days later the Modoc July Complex Fire had a name and the attention of firefighters up and down the state of California and across the nation.

Covering over 83,000 acres, the Modoc July Complex Fire proved challenging in many ways for fire crews.  Rough terrain and unusual weather patterns kept the over 2,300 firefighters on high alert trying to suppress and contain the fire.  The one overarching factor was the weather: weather created by the fire itself including something called Pyrocumulous.

If you’d like to learn more about the Modoc July Complex fire:

InciWeb

Want to learn more about the pyrocumulus formation:

Time-lapse of Pyrocumulus Formation

WildfireToday.com

EarthScience.StackExchange.com

 

 

 

 

 

Building A Fire Camp Overnight: “People Are amazed At How Fast We Can Mobilize”

State - California - CALOES - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 17:45

Despite being one of the largest counties in California, Modoc County has less than 9,000 residents.  Hotels are few and far between in this rural county, so when over 2,000 fire personnel were assigned to battle the Modoc July Complex Fire, housing and logistics were an immediate challenge.

Almost overnight, the California Interagency Incident Management Team 4, along with officials from the US Forest Service, Cal Fire, Cal OES and other cooperators came together to build an incident command post which eventually became home to the thousands of men and women assigned to the fire.

“This (camp) will go up from the time on scene to within 24 hours or less and you’ll have a fully functioning camp,” said Patrick Titus, Operations Section Chief.  “You’ve got to go for life support first,” Titus continued.  “What I mean by that, you’ve got to get the crews fed, you’ve got to get them showered and they’ve got to be able to sleep.  Those three things are key.  All this other stuff comes together over time.”

“People are amazed at how fast we can mobilize,” said Logistics Chief Ross Peckinpah.  “This particular agency put together a camp layout with actual photos of locations of where to set things up,” said Peckinpah.  Despite the advance preparations, setting up an incident command post close enough to the fire was not an easy task.

“On the Modoc (National Forest), there’s not a lot of usable grounds for camping because of the amount of volcanic rock,” Peckinpah explained. “It’s difficult to walk on and, as far as putting down tents or anything, you have to rake it.”

Finding usable grounds for tents isn’t the only hurdle.  The incident command post also includes meeting rooms in the form of trailers and yurts, air and ground logistics, a weather monitoring station and a fully staffed and stocked kitchen capable of feeding the over 2,000 fire personnel three meals a day.

“We provide a large amount of calories for each of the meals.  These firefighters can burn up to 7,000 calories per day, so we require so many ounces of muscle meat for each meal.  We rotate a diet for these folks, high in calories,” said Peckinpah.

You can watch our story on the Modoc July Complex Fire incident command post on our Cal OES YouTube page here.

 

Detwiler Fire (Mariposa County) Started 7/16/2017, updated 8/12/2017

State - California - CALFIRE - Sat, 08/12/2017 - 11:19
Firefighters continued working the fire and continued to mop up and patrol lines. All fire lines are holding. Crews will continue to implement the Incident Fireline Suppression Repair Plan. The public is reminded to stay vigilant for any change in fire conditions. Residents are urged to use caution while driving as fire equipment is still operating in the fire areas. “One Less Spark-One Less Wildfire” For more information, visit www.readyforwildfire.org

An Inside Look At the Modoc July Complex Fire

State - California - CALOES - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 17:07

Lightning activity caused 104 wildfires on the Modoc National Forest beginning July 23, 2017.  Two days later the Modoc July Complex Fire had a name and the attention of firefighters up and down the state of California and across the nation.  

Covering over 83,000 acres, the Modoc July Complex Fire proved challenging in many ways for fire crews.  Rough terrain and unusual weather patterns kept the over 2,300 firefighters on high alert trying to suppress and contain the fire.  

Cal OES spent a week chronicling the efforts both on the fire lines and inside the Command Incident Post to bring you an Inside Look at the Modoc July Complex Fire.   

You can view our video on OESNews.com or on our Cal OES YouTube channel or our Facebook page.

 

 

Get Prepared, Enjoy Family Fun at Prep Day

State - California - CALOES - Wed, 08/09/2017 - 13:02

Are you prepared for the next disaster? In 2017 alone, Californians have already endured a historic drought, flooding, more than 3,000 wildfires and numerous earthquakes, among other emergencies.

When it comes to disasters, California truly is the Wild West.

One month from today, historic Old Sacramento will transform into the 12th annual California Day of Preparedness, otherwise referred to as “Surviving the Wild West”. The one-day, family-friendly event – located on the 1849 Scene near the Railroad Museum – is scheduled for Saturday, August 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Admission is free.

Attendees will learn about emergency preparedness as well as experience a variety of disaster readiness demonstrations including a mobile earthquake simulator, watch water rescues, and witness the skills of search and rescue dogs in action. There will be live demonstrations on two separate stages – the main and river. Other attractions include interacting with first responders, emergency vehicles, food trucks, face painting, music and more.

The event unofficially kicks off National Preparedness Month in September. National Preparedness Month is designed to encourage Americans to take simple steps to prepare for emergencies in their homes, businesses and communities. Whether it’s September or any other month of the year, disasters can strike at any time and without warning.

Click here for complete event details about this year’s California Day of Preparedness.

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