Law Enforcement

Ottawa — Youth Leadership Workshop at the RCMP Academy

RCMP News (Canada) - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 08:45
This week, selected teens from across Canada will have an opportunity at the RCMP Academy in Regina, Saskatchewan, to learn how to make their communities safer.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Search resumed this morning for father and son who went missing while rafting on the Neversink River

State - NY Police - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 08:42
State Police resume search of missing rafters.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Scituate Barracks

State - RI Police - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 07:15
On August 19, 2018 at 9:23 AM, Troopers arrested Jessie Heffner, age 34, of 457 Carrington Avenue, Woonsocket, RI for a Sixth District Court Bench Warrant for Failure to Appear for a Technical Violation on the original charge of Receiving Stolen Goods and Larceny originating out of the Woonsocket...
Categories: Law Enforcement

Wickford Barracks

State - RI Police - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:45
At 12:15 PM, Troopers arrested Breck Holdredge, age 35, of 13 Pike Street, Wakefield, Rhode Island, for 1.) Domestic-Vandalism/Malicious Injury to Property and 2.) Domestic-Disorderly Conduct (Fighting/Tumultuous Behavior). The arrest was the result of a call for a domestic disturbance at the...
Categories: Law Enforcement

East Aurora Woman Arrest For DWI

State - NY Police - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:31
SP Elma- East Aurora women arrested for DWI refuses breath test.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Lincoln Woods Barracks

State - RI Police - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:30
Media Contact: Captain Derek W. Borek District A Commander State Police Headquarters 401-444-1014 At 11:30AM Troopers arrested Bryan Lora Pena, age 21, of 70 Roberts Circle, Cranston, RI for an 1) Third District Court Bench Warrant for 32F Violation Filed on the original charge of...
Categories: Law Enforcement

Holland Man Arrest For Breaking Woman's Nose

State - NY Police - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:27
SP Holland- Holland man arrest after he breaks a womans nose in dispute.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Video: Texas Police Officer Rescues Injured Hawk in the Road

Officer.com - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:02
The Carrollton police officer found the hawk sitting in the road with an injured wing on Aug. 12.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Minnesota Police Outfit Officers With Gun-Mounted Cameras

Officer.com - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 05:44
A west-suburban law enforcement agency is permanently outfitting its officers with lightweight cameras mounted on their handguns, marking them among the first in the state to adopt the homegrown technology amid calls for transparency in police shootings.
Categories: Law Enforcement

NYPD Cracks Down on Station House Videos

Officer.com - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 05:19
A “privileged and confidential” NYPD Legal Bureau memo dated August 15 instructs station house cops to bring criminal trespass charges against people who defy cops’ orders to stop shooting video.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Gunman in Wheelchair Opens Fire on Off-Duty NYPD Officer

Officer.com - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 04:55
A gunman in a wheelchair fired at an off-duty cop at a Brooklyn party early Sunday — and was wounded when the cop returned fire.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Fort Worth Police Officer Recalls Being Shot 5 Times

Officer.com - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 04:44
Fort Worth police officer Xavier Serrano is back on the beat almost two years after being shot five times while answering a call about a suicide attempt in the Wedgwood neighborhood.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Louisiana Sheriff's K-9 Fatally Shot During Pursuit

Officer.com - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 04:38
A Lincoln Parish Sheriff's K-9 Boco was fatally shot while pursing a suspect over the weekend.
Categories: Law Enforcement

St. Paul Body Camera Footage Shows Man Raising Gun Before Officers Fire

Officer.com - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 04:25
Body camera footage released by St. Paul police shows William "Billy" Hughes answer the door to his darkened duplex and raise a handgun before officers fatally shot him earlier this month.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Reward Offered for Most Wanted Sex Offender with ties to Laredo and San Antonio

State - TX - DPS - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 00:00
AUSTIN - The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) has added Raul Alejandro Martinez, 46, to the Texas 10 Most Wanted Sex Offenders list, and a cash reward of up to $5,000 is now being offered for information leading to his capture

Troopers Investigate Roll-Over Crash on I-81 in LaFayette

State - NY Police - Sun, 08/19/2018 - 23:21
Driver was trapped under his small car after it hit a guardrail and rolled over Sunday afternoon on Interstate 81 in the town of LaFayette.
Categories: Law Enforcement

My husband’s suicide: Recognizing predictors of police suicide

Police One - Sun, 08/19/2018 - 20:30

Author: American Military University

By Kim Colegrove, contributor to In Public Safety

Last year, more law enforcement officers died from suicide than in the line-of-duty. Sadly, suicide rates are thought to be much higher than reported – it’s widely accepted that police suicide is woefully under-reported, especially when counting those – like my husband – who commit suicide after retiring.

My husband, David Colegrove, was a law enforcement officer for 30 years. He killed himself in 2014, less than three months after he retired. Since his suicide, I’ve learned a lot about trauma, post-traumatic stress, secondary trauma, hypervigilance and the common predictors of suicide among law enforcement professionals and other first responders.

First and foremost, I’ve realized that my husband and I were sitting smack dab in the middle of all of that, and we didn’t even know it. David carried a tremendous amount of trauma that had roots in his early years, grew exponentially throughout his police career and affected all areas of his life.

The impacts of trauma

Trauma happens when someone experiences or witnesses abuse, victimization, neglect, loss, violence and disasters. Unfortunately, the majority of first responders experience some kind of trauma during their career and it can be toxic to them mentally and emotionally.

In my husband’s first year of policing, when he was only 21 years old, he was involved in a shooting and someone died. He was called into the police station, where his badge and gun were taken away and he was sent home. For days he did not know what was going to happen. Then he got a call telling him he had been cleared and should report to roll call the next day. And that was that. Back to work. No counseling, no conversation and no support of any kind.

In the years that followed, the untreated and unprocessed trauma caused David to experience reoccurring stress symptoms, which he was intermittently able to numb ­­­– typically with alcohol. Over time, accumulated stress and trauma grew so overwhelming and so powerful that it infiltrated his personality, turning an otherwise great guy into an angry, paranoid, cynical character, or an emotional wreck who could not stop crying.

These stress-induced symptoms ultimately left my husband unable to cope with change, uncertainty, or the most basic daily challenges.

The dark side of the light of my life

It has taken me a long time to summon the courage to speak honestly about my husband, his issues and our struggles. David was a very proud and private man, so telling his secrets feels like a betrayal of sorts.

I don’t want to let strangers into the dark corners of our life together. I’d much rather talk about the good times, and there were plenty of those. Anyone who knew us knew that we loved each other deeply and shared an intimate friendship that I may never know again. But when I think about keeping the truth to myself and ignoring all the bad things, I think about those officers who are living with such pain today, right now, and I know I have to tell the truth in hopes that they may avoid the same fate as my husband.

The truth is, there was a dark side to David that cast a shadow on our otherwise sunny life – like a murky figure lurking in the background. When David got emotionally triggered by anger or felt threatened in any way, this dark figure would step out of the shadows and take over. This happened rarely, but when it did, it was intense.

That dark guy was never violent towards me, but he was angry and hateful and completely out of control. After each “episode” had subsided, David was embarrassed, ashamed and apologetic. And even though these episodes were awful, I felt so sorry for my husband because it was clear he was full of pain. I believe this dark alter ego developed as a result of years of unresolved trauma and suffering.

The vulnerability paradox

I observed and endured a lot of dysfunction as a result of my husband’s unresolved trauma. This is extremely difficult for me to admit because I feel vulnerable exposing the underbelly of my imperfect private life. I guess I’m afraid of being judged.

As I identify this feeling of vulnerability within myself, I realize this is the very fear that gripped my husband and kept him from seeking the help he needed. I have deep compassion for this man who, in order to survive and thrive in the law enforcement culture, felt he could not afford to be vulnerable.

That’s the tangled web, isn’t it? Officers are hurting or are scared, but they want people to think they’re okay. Everyone else seems to be doing just fine. If officers are honest about their struggles, if they say they need help, others may think they are weak or broken or crazy. Not to mention the fact that officers could face demotion or dismissal from their job. So, they stay quiet. And they suffer.

The deeper I get into my work with first responders, the more I realize how important it is for me to let my guard down and speak the truth about my husband’s problems and our mostly awesome, but sometimes awful, life together. There are too many people suffering in silence and WAY too many people dying. I hope that David’s story – our story – will shine a light on this reality so others won’t have to endure the same pain and tragedy.

The unraveling

In the year leading up to my husband’s death, his mental health became increasingly worse. His decision to retire after 30 years triggered a surge of anxiety, and although he had spent two years carefully crafting a new business venture with a partner, David was terrified of the uncertainty of civilian life and wallowed in thoughts about worst-case scenarios.

In hindsight, there were all kinds of warning signs during that year. David’s anxiety intensified and the “episodes,” which were almost always alcohol-induced, became more frequent. The dark guy surfaced more often and brought with him fear, worry, angst, paranoia and irrational behavior.

David’s last day at work was Friday, September 5, 2014. On Saturday we had his retirement party. On Sunday he had a full-blown anxiety attack, and by the following week his anxiety sent him to the emergency room. This kicked off two months of intense inpatient and outpatient treatment and the slew of prescription medications did not help. In fact, they made things worse.

He barely made it through Thanksgiving dinner because the anxiety was so intense that he could not sit still, or focus, or even carry on a normal conversation. Two days later, David drove to the back of our neighborhood, sat in his truck, and shot himself.

Commonalities among police suicide victims

If you or someone you know is experiencing the following symptoms, especially if multiple symptoms are concurrent or repetitive, please seek help immediately:

Chronic stress Depression Anxiety Anger Intense irritability Aggression Alcohol Abuse/alcoholism Drug Use/addiction Hopelessness Isolation/withdrawal Suicide Ideation Talk of suicide

Don’t hesitate. Don’t wait. Don’t let your pride get in the way. Reach out to someone and tell them you need help, then accept the help, and do whatever it takes to feel better and live better. Know that what you’re experiencing today is treatable, you can recover from this, you can feel better and you can go on to live your best life. I only wish that I had the knowledge I have today about the impacts of trauma and the treatment options available to have gotten the help for David that he needed and deserved.

About the Author

Kim Colegrove has more than 40 years of experience meditating and has been teaching mindfulness in corporate settings since 2011. Her corporate clients include Garmin International, The National Court Reporters Association, The Department of Veterans Affairs, United Way and others. In 2014, Kim lost her husband, Special Agent David Colegrove, to suicide. As a result of that devastating loss, she founded The PauseFirst Project, and has turned her attention to bringing relief and resilience to first responders through mindfulness training. To contact her, email IPSauthor@apus.edu. For more articles featuring insight from industry experts, subscribe to In Public Safety’s bi-monthly newsletter.


Categories: Law Enforcement

My husband’s suicide: Recognizing predictors of police suicide

Police One - Sun, 08/19/2018 - 20:30

Author: American Military University

By Kim Colegrove, contributor to In Public Safety

Last year, more law enforcement officers died from suicide than in the line-of-duty. Sadly, suicide rates are thought to be much higher than reported – it’s widely accepted that police suicide is woefully under-reported, especially when counting those – like my husband – who commit suicide after retiring.

My husband, David Colegrove, was a law enforcement officer for 30 years. He killed himself in 2014, less than three months after he retired. Since his suicide, I’ve learned a lot about trauma, post-traumatic stress, secondary trauma, hypervigilance and the common predictors of suicide among law enforcement professionals and other first responders.

First and foremost, I’ve realized that my husband and I were sitting smack dab in the middle of all of that, and we didn’t even know it. David carried a tremendous amount of trauma that had roots in his early years, grew exponentially throughout his police career and affected all areas of his life.

The impacts of trauma

Trauma happens when someone experiences or witnesses abuse, victimization, neglect, loss, violence and disasters. Unfortunately, the majority of first responders experience some kind of trauma during their career and it can be toxic to them mentally and emotionally.

In my husband’s first year of policing, when he was only 21 years old, he was involved in a shooting and someone died. He was called into the police station, where his badge and gun were taken away and he was sent home. For days he did not know what was going to happen. Then he got a call telling him he had been cleared and should report to roll call the next day. And that was that. Back to work. No counseling, no conversation and no support of any kind.

In the years that followed, the untreated and unprocessed trauma caused David to experience reoccurring stress symptoms, which he was intermittently able to numb ­­­– typically with alcohol. Over time, accumulated stress and trauma grew so overwhelming and so powerful that it infiltrated his personality, turning an otherwise great guy into an angry, paranoid, cynical character, or an emotional wreck who could not stop crying.

These stress-induced symptoms ultimately left my husband unable to cope with change, uncertainty, or the most basic daily challenges.

The dark side of the light of my life

It has taken me a long time to summon the courage to speak honestly about my husband, his issues and our struggles. David was a very proud and private man, so telling his secrets feels like a betrayal of sorts.

I don’t want to let strangers into the dark corners of our life together. I’d much rather talk about the good times, and there were plenty of those. Anyone who knew us knew that we loved each other deeply and shared an intimate friendship that I may never know again. But when I think about keeping the truth to myself and ignoring all the bad things, I think about those officers who are living with such pain today, right now, and I know I have to tell the truth in hopes that they may avoid the same fate as my husband.

The truth is, there was a dark side to David that cast a shadow on our otherwise sunny life – like a murky figure lurking in the background. When David got emotionally triggered by anger or felt threatened in any way, this dark figure would step out of the shadows and take over. This happened rarely, but when it did, it was intense.

That dark guy was never violent towards me, but he was angry and hateful and completely out of control. After each “episode” had subsided, David was embarrassed, ashamed and apologetic. And even though these episodes were awful, I felt so sorry for my husband because it was clear he was full of pain. I believe this dark alter ego developed as a result of years of unresolved trauma and suffering.

The vulnerability paradox

I observed and endured a lot of dysfunction as a result of my husband’s unresolved trauma. This is extremely difficult for me to admit because I feel vulnerable exposing the underbelly of my imperfect private life. I guess I’m afraid of being judged.

As I identify this feeling of vulnerability within myself, I realize this is the very fear that gripped my husband and kept him from seeking the help he needed. I have deep compassion for this man who, in order to survive and thrive in the law enforcement culture, felt he could not afford to be vulnerable.

That’s the tangled web, isn’t it? Officers are hurting or are scared, but they want people to think they’re okay. Everyone else seems to be doing just fine. If officers are honest about their struggles, if they say they need help, others may think they are weak or broken or crazy. Not to mention the fact that officers could face demotion or dismissal from their job. So, they stay quiet. And they suffer.

The deeper I get into my work with first responders, the more I realize how important it is for me to let my guard down and speak the truth about my husband’s problems and our mostly awesome, but sometimes awful, life together. There are too many people suffering in silence and WAY too many people dying. I hope that David’s story – our story – will shine a light on this reality so others won’t have to endure the same pain and tragedy.

The unraveling

In the year leading up to my husband’s death, his mental health became increasingly worse. His decision to retire after 30 years triggered a surge of anxiety, and although he had spent two years carefully crafting a new business venture with a partner, David was terrified of the uncertainty of civilian life and wallowed in thoughts about worst-case scenarios.

In hindsight, there were all kinds of warning signs during that year. David’s anxiety intensified and the “episodes,” which were almost always alcohol-induced, became more frequent. The dark guy surfaced more often and brought with him fear, worry, angst, paranoia and irrational behavior.

David’s last day at work was Friday, September 5, 2014. On Saturday we had his retirement party. On Sunday he had a full-blown anxiety attack, and by the following week his anxiety sent him to the emergency room. This kicked off two months of intense inpatient and outpatient treatment and the slew of prescription medications did not help. In fact, they made things worse.

He barely made it through Thanksgiving dinner because the anxiety was so intense that he could not sit still, or focus, or even carry on a normal conversation. Two days later, David drove to the back of our neighborhood, sat in his truck, and shot himself.

Commonalities among police suicide victims

If you or someone you know is experiencing the following symptoms, especially if multiple symptoms are concurrent or repetitive, please seek help immediately:

Chronic stress Depression Anxiety Anger Intense irritability Aggression Alcohol Abuse/alcoholism Drug Use/addiction Hopelessness Isolation/withdrawal Suicide Ideation Talk of suicide

Don’t hesitate. Don’t wait. Don’t let your pride get in the way. Reach out to someone and tell them you need help, then accept the help, and do whatever it takes to feel better and live better. Know that what you’re experiencing today is treatable, you can recover from this, you can feel better and you can go on to live your best life. I only wish that I had the knowledge I have today about the impacts of trauma and the treatment options available to have gotten the help for David that he needed and deserved.

About the Author

Kim Colegrove has more than 40 years of experience meditating and has been teaching mindfulness in corporate settings since 2011. Her corporate clients include Garmin International, The National Court Reporters Association, The Department of Veterans Affairs, United Way and others. In 2014, Kim lost her husband, Special Agent David Colegrove, to suicide. As a result of that devastating loss, she founded The PauseFirst Project, and has turned her attention to bringing relief and resilience to first responders through mindfulness training. To contact her, email IPSauthor@apus.edu. For more articles featuring insight from industry experts, subscribe to In Public Safety’s bi-monthly newsletter.


Categories: Law Enforcement

Traffic stop leads to drug arrest

State - NY Police - Sun, 08/19/2018 - 18:22
On August 18th, 2018, Troopers out of SP Jamestown arrested Colleen Hall, 50, of Marysville, OH, for Unlawful Possession of Marijuana.
Categories: Law Enforcement

UPDATE: State police are looking for two people in the Neversink River

State - NY Police - Sun, 08/19/2018 - 17:13
State police continue to search for a father and son that went missing on the Neversink River.
Categories: Law Enforcement

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