Law Enforcement

Wickford Barracks

State - RI Police - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 06:45
At 7:11 AM, Troopers arrested Tiago Keita, age 20, of 224 Harrison Street, Providence, RI, for a Providence Superior Court Bench Warrant for Failure to Appear for Pre-Arraignment Conference on the original charge of Larceny Greater than $1,500 originating from the Providence Police Department. The
Categories: Law Enforcement

Mistaken assumptions and lessons learned during rescue task force training

Police One - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 06:00

Author: Dan Danaher

The need to integrate fire/EMS personnel alongside law enforcement officers during response to mass casualty incidents (MCIs) is critical. Whether the incident is an active shooter, a bombing, an edged-weapon attack or even a vehicular attack, first responders must work together to effectively mitigate such events.

I was recently involved in conducting a Rescue Task Force (RTF) training pilot program primarily for fire and EMS personnel. This 2-day course covered tactical casualty care and an introduction to RTF training integrated with law enforcement officers within a designated warm zone.

For this training, the warm zone was defined as an area that had been visually cleared and was not under a direct threat, although the potential for harm did exist. The mission for fire/EMS personnel was to render aid to those who had received life-threatening injuries. The role of the law enforcement officers was to provide security in the event that a threat emerged in the area of operation.

Once all of the isolation drills had been completed, students were exposed to reality-based scenarios in a stress-induced environment. As we began to conduct the training, issues came to light that surprised both students and instructors alike. We had mistakenly made assumptions related to student training and equipment, as well as identified key lessons that we are sharing here to assist other agencies in preparing for similar programs.

Training highlighted mistaken assumptions

Fire/EMS personnel are currently trained to deal with mass casualty injuries.

It became apparent fairly quickly that these responders were neither familiar with treating massive hemorrhage injuries, nor did they have the equipment. Although some had been provided with a tourniquet, they had not trained with them.

Fire/EMS personnel have the necessary equipment to intervene when they encounter victims with life-threatening injuries in an austere environment.

Most of the attendees lacked personal protective equipment to operate in a warm zone while trying to render aid to victims. It is recommended that fire/EMS agencies acquire ballistic vests and helmets for personnel who would be working in the warm zone.

Providers must carry equipment on their person that includes tourniquets, blood clotting gauze, occlusive dressings (chest seals), pressure dressings and tape (duct tape) and triage markings – enough to treat a minimum of 10 victims.

A portable litter is advisable. After just one or two extractions, students were becoming visibly exhausted. Many started to improvise by using rolling chairs, carts and blankets to assist with extractions of patients back to a casualty collection point.

Training highlighted lessons learned

Fire/EMS personnel have been trained since day one to check the ABCs (airway, breathing, circulation) during their initial patient assessment.

Based on injuries sustained in mass casualty incidents, the MARCH assessment approach is now recommended: Massive hemorrhage, Airway, Respiration, Circulation, Hypothermia/head injury. Based on statistical data, we have learned that massive hemorrhage is the leading cause of fatalities and therefore should be addressed before establishing a viable airway.

Conduct training in a reality-based setting under stressful conditions.

Most of the students were able to grasp the concepts of RTF care, conduct their initial assessments and apply the appropriate treatments during isolation drills in a classroom (non-stress) environment. It was apparent that once stress was induced into the same applications, performance levels noticeably decreased. However, after a progression of scenarios, the performance level rose to the same level it had been during the isolation drills in the non-stressed environment.

The benefits of exposing students to the stimulus they will encounter will, to some degree, inoculate them from stress overload if they were to ever experience an MCI firsthand.

The importance of conducting Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) training for police, fire and EMS

As stated previously, neither fire/EMS personnel nor police officers are properly trained or equipped to handle a MCI. Responding to an MCI is a unique situation and is rarely, if ever, encountered. All first responders need to be able to respond in a proactive and cohesive manner to mitigate the effects of an MCI.

TECC addresses injuries that are consistent not only with MCIs, but also injuries a first responder could encounter in the field. First responders need to be able to attend to the injuries of others, but also themselves if they were to become injured performing their duties. TECC teaches both self-aid and buddy-aid.

If all first responders are trained in TECC, they can better assist one another during their response. Although law enforcement’s role is to provide security during an MCI, all first responders can be trained in life-saving techniques and rescue carries, and carry life-saving equipment that can be shared among personnel.

Emphasis of RTF is to stop the bleeding – not tactics.

The purpose of RTF training is to get treatment to victims who have been seriously injured but whose wounds, if treated quickly, are survivable. Due to the austere conditions under which these types of incidents occur, it is necessary to assume a significant amount of risk, within reason, when it is likely a life can be saved. For that reason, law enforcement officers are integrated with fire/EMS as a security escort.

Law enforcement operates in the hot zone in order to eliminate the threat, or at least contain it to a specific area. The RTF should operate only in warm and cold zones and should be restricted from entering the hot zone. Because the direct threat has been either eliminated or isolated, the RTF can focus on its primary mission, which is to stop the bleeding. If for any reason the warm zone is compromised, it is now a hot zone and the RTF should evacuate or shelter in place.

The only “tactics” that are addressed during the integration of the RTF, comprised of law enforcement and fire/EMS, is how to merge into a single unit and move “tactically” into the area of operation. Several drills are conducted to establish movement and communications amongst the RTF team. This usually consists of two or three law enforcement officers positioning themselves to shield the two fire/EMS personnel from potential threat areas as they move from point to point.

Conclusion

The October 2017 Las Vegas shooting was an education under fire for many first responders and numerous lessons were learned. First responders need to open lines of communication and share knowledge, experience and resources so we can coalesce all of our assets toward separate, yet mutually compatible, objectives through the combined efforts of a RTF response.

These are just a few of the lessons learned from our RTF training. Hopefully this will aid other agencies as they go forward with their initiatives to train for and prepare their response to mass casualty incidents.


Categories: Law Enforcement

Mistaken assumptions and lessons learned during rescue task force training

Police One - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 06:00

Author: Dan Danaher

The need to integrate fire/EMS personnel alongside law enforcement officers during response to mass casualty incidents (MCIs) is critical. Whether the incident is an active shooter, a bombing, an edged-weapon attack or even a vehicular attack, first responders must work together to effectively mitigate such events.

I was recently involved in conducting a Rescue Task Force (RTF) training pilot program primarily for fire and EMS personnel. This 2-day course covered tactical casualty care and an introduction to RTF training integrated with law enforcement officers within a designated warm zone.

For this training, the warm zone was defined as an area that had been visually cleared and was not under a direct threat, although the potential for harm did exist. The mission for fire/EMS personnel was to render aid to those who had received life-threatening injuries. The role of the law enforcement officers was to provide security in the event that a threat emerged in the area of operation.

Once all of the isolation drills had been completed, students were exposed to reality-based scenarios in a stress-induced environment. As we began to conduct the training, issues came to light that surprised both students and instructors alike. We had mistakenly made assumptions related to student training and equipment, as well as identified key lessons that we are sharing here to assist other agencies in preparing for similar programs.

Training highlighted mistaken assumptions

Fire/EMS personnel are currently trained to deal with mass casualty injuries.

It became apparent fairly quickly that these responders were neither familiar with treating massive hemorrhage injuries, nor did they have the equipment. Although some had been provided with a tourniquet, they had not trained with them.

Fire/EMS personnel have the necessary equipment to intervene when they encounter victims with life-threatening injuries in an austere environment.

Most of the attendees lacked personal protective equipment to operate in a warm zone while trying to render aid to victims. It is recommended that fire/EMS agencies acquire ballistic vests and helmets for personnel who would be working in the warm zone.

Providers must carry equipment on their person that includes tourniquets, blood clotting gauze, occlusive dressings (chest seals), pressure dressings and tape (duct tape) and triage markings – enough to treat a minimum of 10 victims.

A portable litter is advisable. After just one or two extractions, students were becoming visibly exhausted. Many started to improvise by using rolling chairs, carts and blankets to assist with extractions of patients back to a casualty collection point.

Training highlighted lessons learned

Fire/EMS personnel have been trained since day one to check the ABCs (airway, breathing, circulation) during their initial patient assessment.

Based on injuries sustained in mass casualty incidents, the MARCH assessment approach is now recommended: Massive hemorrhage, Airway, Respiration, Circulation, Hypothermia/head injury. Based on statistical data, we have learned that massive hemorrhage is the leading cause of fatalities and therefore should be addressed before establishing a viable airway.

Conduct training in a reality-based setting under stressful conditions.

Most of the students were able to grasp the concepts of RTF care, conduct their initial assessments and apply the appropriate treatments during isolation drills in a classroom (non-stress) environment. It was apparent that once stress was induced into the same applications, performance levels noticeably decreased. However, after a progression of scenarios, the performance level rose to the same level it had been during the isolation drills in the non-stressed environment.

The benefits of exposing students to the stimulus they will encounter will, to some degree, inoculate them from stress overload if they were to ever experience an MCI firsthand.

The importance of conducting Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) training for police, fire and EMS

As stated previously, neither fire/EMS personnel nor police officers are properly trained or equipped to handle a MCI. Responding to an MCI is a unique situation and is rarely, if ever, encountered. All first responders need to be able to respond in a proactive and cohesive manner to mitigate the effects of an MCI.

TECC addresses injuries that are consistent not only with MCIs, but also injuries a first responder could encounter in the field. First responders need to be able to attend to the injuries of others, but also themselves if they were to become injured performing their duties. TECC teaches both self-aid and buddy-aid.

If all first responders are trained in TECC, they can better assist one another during their response. Although law enforcement’s role is to provide security during an MCI, all first responders can be trained in life-saving techniques and rescue carries, and carry life-saving equipment that can be shared among personnel.

Emphasis of RTF is to stop the bleeding – not tactics.

The purpose of RTF training is to get treatment to victims who have been seriously injured but whose wounds, if treated quickly, are survivable. Due to the austere conditions under which these types of incidents occur, it is necessary to assume a significant amount of risk, within reason, when it is likely a life can be saved. For that reason, law enforcement officers are integrated with fire/EMS as a security escort.

Law enforcement operates in the hot zone in order to eliminate the threat, or at least contain it to a specific area. The RTF should operate only in warm and cold zones and should be restricted from entering the hot zone. Because the direct threat has been either eliminated or isolated, the RTF can focus on its primary mission, which is to stop the bleeding. If for any reason the warm zone is compromised, it is now a hot zone and the RTF should evacuate or shelter in place.

The only “tactics” that are addressed during the integration of the RTF, comprised of law enforcement and fire/EMS, is how to merge into a single unit and move “tactically” into the area of operation. Several drills are conducted to establish movement and communications amongst the RTF team. This usually consists of two or three law enforcement officers positioning themselves to shield the two fire/EMS personnel from potential threat areas as they move from point to point.

Conclusion

The October 2017 Las Vegas shooting was an education under fire for many first responders and numerous lessons were learned. First responders need to open lines of communication and share knowledge, experience and resources so we can coalesce all of our assets toward separate, yet mutually compatible, objectives through the combined efforts of a RTF response.

These are just a few of the lessons learned from our RTF training. Hopefully this will aid other agencies as they go forward with their initiatives to train for and prepare their response to mass casualty incidents.


Categories: Law Enforcement

10 SWAT lessons to live by

Police One - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 06:00

Author: Mike Wood

At the 2017 California Association of Tactical Officers (CATO) Conference, Don Kester of the National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) hosted a thought-provoking session on the challenges faced by tactical teams, and the lessons we should be learning from our mistakes.

Sadly, it seems that agencies and tactical teams continue to repeat the same mistakes, indicating we’re not learning from our own experiences or those of our peers. Don identified several reasons for this, and challenged the officers in attendance to remove the obstacles that prevent us from learning and improving our teams, capabilities and operational success.

As a starting point, Don suggested tactical teams focus on the following lessons identified from critical incidents around the nation:

1. Learn to ask “why?”

Don suggested tactical teams need to ask, “Why are we at this call?”

In the current environment, SWAT is frequently called out for situations where it may be inappropriate to deploy, so every callout must begin with an assessment of whether SWAT intervention is justified.

For example, Don addressed the complicated issue of dealing with barricaded, suicidal subjects who have committed no criminal act, and are not a risk to anybody else. In these situations, intervention from a team of mental health and medical professionals may be more appropriate than deploying a SWAT team.

Learning to ask, “Why are we here?” will help to begin the process of risk mitigation, and prevent an inappropriate deployment of a tactical team.

Sometimes the best course of action is recognizing SWAT is not the best solution, and demobilizing the team, but this is only possible with strong communication and leadership skills.

2. Learn to be smarter.

Don discussed how tactical teams need to focus on the best ways of doing business, that is, the best tactics. It’s easy to get stuck in a rut, so tactical teams need to challenge their practices, and seek improved ways of getting the job done. Leaders also need to listen to members of the team, because sometimes the best ideas come from the bottom up, not the top down.

3. Learn other ways of doing business.

Sometimes we fall into the trap of following habit patterns without thinking critically, and Don challenged the audience to continuously ask themselves if there is a better way of doing things.

For example, calling out SWAT to raid a house is one way of doing business, but is it the best way? SWAT officers should ask:

Can the suspect be apprehended in a less dangerous manner in another location or at another time? Are there other options to flashbangs that could be safer? Does a particular operation justify a full team deployment, or are there other options to calling out SWAT? Are there new technologies that we can use to reduce exposing our people to unnecessary risk? 4. Learn to stick with the basics, and apply them.

Tactical teams often make bad decisions when they stray from basic principles, or fail to apply them properly. For example, are a team’s actions guided by the “safety priorities” model? When the safety priorities are reversed, tactical leaders can unwittingly risk the safety of innocents or officers to protect the suspect, which is obviously undesirable.

Similarly, are tactical teams operating with an understanding of “good time and bad time?” Do they continuously assess who benefits or who suffers from the actions being taken or contemplated? Are they looking to take advantage of opportunity, or change the operational tempo as required to successfully resolve the situation?

5. Training matters.

Tactical teams are constantly challenged by a lack of time, staff, resources, or budget, so leaders need to ensure they are getting the most out of training.

Are teams focusing on the core skills needed for mission accomplishment, or wasting time and resources on irrelevant – but entertaining – training activities? Is there a true process in place to analyze what training needs to focus on? Is there a good plan to manage the training program, assess its effectiveness and modify it to meet operational needs?

6. Education matters.

Education expands knowledge, and introduces a team to skills, tactics and concepts they may not have been aware of. Does the agency and the team encourage professional development?

7. Documentation matters.

Tactical teams need to document everything. They need to document training, lesson plans, policies, procedures, missions, equipment status . . . everything! In today’s environment, a tactical team that fails to document these areas of concern will not fare well in the courtroom.

8. The importance of After Action Reports (AARs).

Tactical teams must analyze their operations and document them to ensure continuous improvement and to be prepared for legal challenges. In the wake of an operation, teams need to determine if there are policy, personnel, equipment, leadership, tactics, or training issues that positively or negatively influenced the incident. Don cautioned against trying to make all AARs look as if everything went perfectly – be honest in your self-criticism, and ferret out those areas where the team can improve its performance.

9. The importance of interagency teamwork.

Tactical teams obviously need to encourage teamwork within the team, but they also need to learn how to work effectively with neighboring teams or other agencies, such as fire-EMS. In an age where terrorism, active shooters, and complex, coordinated attacks are becoming more commonplace, even the best tactical teams are incapable of doing it all by themselves. Teams need to be able to effectively combine resources when the job demands it.

10. Promoting emotional intelligence.

Don strongly advises that tactical teams and their leaders must promote the development of “emotional intelligence” in officers. Emotional intelligence deals with how we respond to challenges and stress. How do we control ourselves, process information and make decisions during critical incidents? What do we do, and how do we react under stress?

Don suggests emotional intelligence is an attribute we need to groom in our tactical team members and leaders, and it’s best done via a purposeful process that includes continuous training and education. The military – and even corporate America – offer good models for how law enforcement can develop emotional intelligence in police officers, and Don advises we need to spend more time and effort on this area to enhance success in tactical operations.

Going Forward

Don provided the CATO Conference attendees excellent guidance on how to evaluate their teams’ strengths and weaknesses with an eye toward improvement.

His briefing is part of the larger effort from CATO and NTOA to “professionalize” SWAT, and raise the bar on training and standards for this critical area of law enforcement. Both CATO and NTOA provide world-class training and education through seminars, agency-hosted training schools and programs like the NTOA Academy Command College.

Visit http://catonews.org/ and http://www.ntoa.org/ for more information about training opportunities that will take you and your SWAT team to the next level.


Categories: Law Enforcement

10 crowd control myths

Police One - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 06:00

Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

As a career-long trainer and practitioner of crowd control tactics, I would like to share with you 10 myths about police crowd control embraced by many unenlightened folks both outside and inside law enforcement.

Myth 1: Crowd control team tactics are “confrontational.”

The opposite is true.

Crowd control training teaches crowd dynamics to help police officers better facilitate lawful speech and peaceful assemblies. In most cases, these efforts are successful.

However, when determined individuals intent on inciting violence foment a confrontation there are five available options. Officers can fight, flee, submit, negotiate or posture. Submitting and fleeing are rarely viable options for peace-keepers.

Crowd control-trained police officers will communicate constantly (negotiate) to prevent/diffuse confrontation. Once an assembly turns unlawful, communication will continue via individual interaction, PA, LRAD or bullhorn. Trained officers are equipped with effective crowd control “team tactics,” also known as posturing, which have proved effective in holding, separating, moving and dispersing belligerent crowds without a fight.

Myth 2: Police equipment is militaristic.

Myth two is often used in conjunction with myth one as a talking point by some media. Some police commanders may also have these misperceptions, resulting in officers being placed in harm’s way through being ill-prepared and ill-equipped.

The truth is, when officers don helmets they are not looking for a street fight any more than wearing body armor translates to a desire for a gun fight. Helmets, vests and BearCats are protective equipment designed to keep officers safe in unsafe environments.

Myth 3: All speech is constitutionally protected.

Not true!

Nationwide, statutes like “Disorderly Conduct” and “Inciting to Riot” exist prohibiting unlawful speech/actions. If shouting “fire” in a crowded theater is unprotected speech it is reasonable to believe, “Let’s burn this city down,” shouted in a crowded demonstration is also unprotected. Courts also recognize that “opprobrious words,” (fighting words) are not protected.

Clarify in advance what your district attorney will prosecute since it varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Myth 4: Use of chemical munitions needs to be prohibited.

Many police administrators and mayors disallow the use of chemical munitions, in spite of the fact that proper use of them has been proven to send most violent crowds packing.

Chemical munitions are prohibited by default simply by failing to maintain certifications or failure to replace old chemical munitions. These certifications and munitions have a limited shelf life.

Myth 5: As police officers have TASERs, police batons are no longer are needed.

All street officers should have access to expandable batons on a daily basis, and a wooden baton in a ring/holster, while working a crowd. The properly displayed baton re-enforces lawful verbal commands at close quarters like no other tool.

Formations of officers uniformly displaying batons in a trained manner can more effectively hold, separate or move a crowd than officers without batons.

Myth 6: When working a crowd, you ignore the small stuff and wait for something major to happen.

Not so much.

If you want small problems to snowball into a big problem then continually ignore deliberate acts of defiance and violence. Both everything done and not done by officers will be noticed by the crowd. It is especially important for police officers to identify efforts early of those individuals want to lead a crowd down a violent path. Immediately recruit the help you need and address the problem, because one person can lead many toward violence.

In a crowd if you intervene in an argument, you prevent a fight. When you prevent a fight, you prevent a brawl. If you prevent a brawl, you avoid a riot. In other words it’s easier to put out a cigarette butt then a forest fire.

Myth 7: Mayors should take control during violent civil unrest.

Are you kidding?

This makes as much sense as an untrained mayor climbing into a snowplow when it snows.

If a mayor wants the best results for his or her city, they should see to it that their police department is properly led, trained and equipped. Then let them do their job.

Myth 8: Crowds can assemble anywhere, anytime they want and this is constitutionally protected.

False!

For example crowds that decide on a whim to march onto an interstate and suddenly shut down traffic are dangerous to others and themselves. This is a perfect example of an unlawful assembly. Your state’s statutes will describe what constitutes an unlawful assembly.

Most local jurisdictions also have a permit procedure to follow if a group wants to hold a legal demonstration on a public street or in a park. In most cities, pitching a tent on a city street is prohibited by ordinance. Police can choose to ignore one tent illegally pitched, but the next thing you know you will have to figure out what to do with the tent-city choking off your business district.

Myth 9: Cameras are the enemy of the police.

On the contrary, crowd control situations are an opportunity for well-trained police professionals to shine on camera in front of a national and international audience. When necessary, your own cameras can counteract inaccurate media reporting with your unedited recordings. Your cameras will also greatly assist in prosecution of offenders.

Myth 10: Crowd control training is for teams only.

Wrong again!

Every entry level officers should be taught crowd control since these skills will be invaluable throughout their career for preventing/surviving large disturbances. Sadly, however, most academies do not yet offer crowd control training.

Now is a good time to train every officer in the nation, or lament later.

Conclusion

Civil unrest has reared its angry head as cyclically as the seasons. Yet law enforcement is continually caught off guard by its arrival. There will also always be spontaneous crowds that are fueled by passion and/or alcohol that suddenly form to do great harm.

However, nothing has gotten more of these crowds to disperse like a thin blue line of well-trained officers calmly approaching a crowd while politely proclaiming, “Time to go home folks. The party’s over.” And that’s no myth.


Categories: Law Enforcement

Maryland Deputy Treats Own Injuries After Being Stabbed in the Face

Officer.com - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:56
Prince George's County Sheriff's Deputy Nick Romanchik treated his own severe injuries after he was stabbed in the face while responding to a distress call Monday morning.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Second Georgia Deputy Heads Home After Shooting That Killed Officer

Officer.com - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:50
Henry County Sheriff's Deputy Ralph "Sid" Callaway was released from Atlanta Medical Center following the memorial service for Locust Grove Police Officer Chase Maddox.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Police Chiefs Push for Gun Control

Officer.com - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:45
Top state law enforcement officers calling for lawmakers to tighten gun control regulations.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Baltimore Named Nation's Most Dangerous City

Officer.com - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:35
Baltimore's highest-ever per capita homicide rate in 2017 also made it the deadliest big city in the country, USA Today reported Monday.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Ballistic Backpack Sales Spike After Florida School Shooting

Officer.com - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:30
Global orders for bullet-resistant school supplies have been coming in "fast and furious" to a Lowell manufacturer since the Valentine's Day massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Two South Carolina Deputies Injured in Confrontation

Officer.com - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:25
State authorities are investigating a Beaufort County incident in which a 24-year-old man lost consciousness after allegedly assaulting a Beaufort County Sheriff's Office deputy.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Postal Worker Fatally Shot on Texas Highway

Officer.com - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:20
A United States Postal Service worker was shot and killed on a Texas highway early Monday morning.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Robbery Suspect Tricked by California Police Officers

Officer.com - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:10
A man suspected of robbing a car parts store last week was arrested Friday after an officer tricked him into showing up to a meeting with the stolen goods.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Missing Runaway Juvenile

Sheriff - Hillsboro County (Tampa, FL) - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 04:34
She left her residence and has not returned.
Categories: Law Enforcement

DPS Offers Increased Reward, Seeks Leads in 2005 LaSalle County Murder

State - TX - DPS - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 00:00
AUSTIN - The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is asking for the public's help in solving the 2005 murder of Valerie Benevidez Laguna

Two arrested for drug possession

State - NY Police - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 21:24
  
Categories: Law Enforcement

Traffic Stop Leads to Stolen Handgun Arrest

State - NY Police - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 20:39
On 2/17/18, the New York State Police based in Fonda arrested 22 year old Nayshia Alvarez of Gloversville following a traffic stop.

Categories: Law Enforcement

Erie resident charged with multiple offenses following traffic stop

State - NY Police - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 20:07
On February 17th, 2018, Troopers out of SP Jamestown arrested Matthew Ebach, 21 of Erie, PA, for Driving While Ability Impaired by Drugs, Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance 7th Degree and Unlawful Possession of Marijuana.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Traffic stop leads to drug arrest

State - NY Police - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 19:51
On February 17th, 2018, Troopers out of SP Jamestown arrested Jed Tonkin, 21, of Jamestown, for Unlawful Possession of Marijuana.
Categories: Law Enforcement

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