Law Enforcement

Dick's Asked to Donate Rifles to Police Rather Than Destroy Them

Police Magazine - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:18

Dick’s Sporting Goods has announced that it will not sell AR-style rifles in any of its 700 plus stores and it plans to destroy its unsold stock.

Gun enthusiasts are asking the company to donate the rifles to cash-strapped police departments, Recoil Magazine reports.

"You can reach out to the Dick’s Sporting Goods customer service team, in the most respectful way possible, and request that instead of destroying all of these rifles, we want Dick’s to donate them to police departments that don’t have a patrol rifle program or simply don’t have the funds to supply officers with needed equipment," Recoil wrote.

Find ways to contact Dick’s HERE, find their Facebook HERE, or Twitter HERE.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Some Illinois Lawmakers Want to Replace SROs with Therapists

Police Magazine - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:18

Some Illinois lawmakers want to give extra money to schools that replace armed security officers with unarmed social workers and behavior therapists.

Rep. Emanuel "Chris" Welch, a Hillside Democrat, said he proposed the plan after hearing from advocates who argue that investing in mental health resources is the best way of treating the epidemic of violence.

His plan, which is backed by 16 other Democrats in the House, would allow schools to apply to an optional grant if they promise to reallocate funding for school-based law enforcement to mental health services, including social workers or other practices "designed to promote school safety and healthy environments."

The measure could be a tough sell, especially amid a widespread effort to employ more of what's known as school resource officers — fully armed law enforcement officers often paid for by schools, the Associated Press reports.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions proposed a school safety plan in March that included a measure prioritizing grants to states that agree to use the money to put more law enforcement in schools.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

NYPD Officer Kills Self Outside Department Facility

Police Magazine - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:18

An on-duty NYPD officer fatally shot himself while parked outside a department facility in the Bronx Friday, authorities said.

He's the fourth NYPD officer to take his own life in as many months, police told the New York Daily News.

First responders rushed to an NYPD Auto Crime and Narcotics Division facility in Wakefield about 10:50 a.m., where the mortally wounded officer was found sitting in his personal vehicle in the parking lot.

Officers rushed him to Jacobi Medical Center, but he could not be saved. His name was not immediately disclosed.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

140 Officers Committed Suicide in 2017

Police Magazine - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:18

Suicides left more officers and firefighters dead last year than all line-of-duty deaths combined — a jarring statistic that continues to plague first responders but garners little attention. 

A new study by the Ruderman Family Foundation, a philanthropic organization that works for the rights of people with disabilities, looked at depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and other issues affecting first responders and the rates of suicide in departments nationwide.

The group found that while suicide has been an ingrained issue for years, very little has been done to address it even though first responders have PTSD and depression at a level five times that of civilians.

Last year, 103 firefighters and 140 police officers committed suicide, whereas 93 firefighters and 129 officers died in the line of duty, which includes everything from being fatally shot, stabbed, drowning or dying in a car accident while on the job.

Miriam Heyman, one of the co-authors of the study, told USA Today the numbers of suicide are extremely under-reported, while other more high-profile deaths make headlines. There were 46 officers who died after being fatally shot on the job in 2017, nearly 67% less than the number of suicides. 

Related Articles:

Preventing Police Suicides

Taking Care of Yourself

Police Suicides: Cop Killer

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Death of Detroit Officer Shot in 1972 Now Ruled a homicide

Police Magazine - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:18

"We were investigating drug sales on the street," said Retired Detroit Deputy Police Chief James Younger whose partner was shot in 1972 by a man who was never arrested for the crime. 

The shooting left Detroit Police Officer Donald Kimbrough paralyzed from the waist down and he died December 7, 2017, from medical complications that resulted from the decades old shooting. 

"With the knowledge that he was shot and never fully recovered, the manner is homicide," says Dr. Bernardino Pacris from the Oakland County Medical Examiner's Officer who conducted an autopsy on Kimbrough and recovered an oxidized, deformed bullet from Kimbrough's back. 

Sergeant Todd Eby of Detroit's Homicide Task Force has been assigned to solving this extremely cold case, WXYZ reports.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

North Carolina Agency Offers Munchies to People Arrested on 4/20 Weed Holiday

Police Magazine - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:18

Those who get arrested in Southern Pines, North Carolina, for celebrating "Weed Day" on Friday are in for a treat when they arrive at the police station.

The Southern Pines Police Department is taking a light-hearted approach to April 20, informally known as "Weed Day."

“To ensure the Southern Pines Police Department is prepared for additional guests visiting our detention facility on the 4/20 holiday, advanced preparation has taken place to accommodate the needs of these prisoners,” the police department posted on its Facebook page on Thursday.

Photos of a holding cell stocked with Oreos, Coca-Cola and Cha-Ching wavy potato chips in a bowl accompanied the post. A pair of handcuffs was casually placed next to the Oreos, the News & Observer reports.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Pennsylvania Detective Dies During Physical Training

Police Magazine - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:18

A New Castle, PA, police detective and special response team member died Thursday while participating in the team's mandatory physical training.

The New Castle Police Department reports on Facebook that Detective Sgt. Brian Cuscino had been with the New Castle Police Department since 2001. He worked as a patrol officer for approximately 10 years and was then promoted to a detective in the criminal investigative division.

Detective Cuscino served as the department's lead homicide investigator and the agency says he had an amazing 100% clearance rate on homicide cases in which he was the lead detective.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Some Churches Commit to Stop Calling the Police

Police Magazine - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:18

First Congregational Church of Oakland shares a neighborhood with many homeless people, and they often come to the church in times of mental health crises. Sometimes church members feel unequipped to deal with the erratic behavior: the most heart-wrenching scenes, volunteer leader Nichola Torbett says, are the times when the church is closing for the day, and a person with nowhere else to go absolutely refuses to leave the building.

At least once or twice a month, at their wits’ end, the church members call 911.

Now, the church has joined a small handful of congregations with a radical goal: to stop calling the police. Not for mental health crises, not for graffiti on their buildings, not even for acts of violence. These churches believe they should wash their hands entirely of the American police system.

The churches call their drastic approach “divesting” from policing. The project of divesting is organized by Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ), a nationwide organization that tries to get white Americans working on behalf of racial justice. The four Unitarian and Protestant churches that have joined so far include three in the Bay Area and one in Iowa City. The Northern California Nevada Conference of the United Church of Christ has signed on to recruit from among its member churches, and the Bay Area churches are talking to more congregations in their area, from denominations including the Disciples of Christ and the Presbyterian Church (USA), the Mercury News reports.

“It’s a challenging ask,” acknowledged the Rev. Anne Dunlap, a United Church of Christ minister who leads SURJ’s outreach to faith communities. “It’s a big ask to invite us, as white folks, to think differently about what safety means. Who do we rely on? What is safe? For whom? Should our safety be predicated on violence for other communities? And if not, what do we do if we’re confronted with a situation, because we are, as congregations? . . . How do we handle it if there’s a burglary? How do we handle it if there’s a situation of violence or abuse in the congregation?”

Those are hard questions. The churches that commit to ending their use of police resources are training members in alternate responses to danger. Torbett said at First Congregational, church leaders have invited experts from several nonprofits to train members on de-escalating mental health crises, and on self-defense in the case of a violent person at the church. “Our goal is to never call the police,” she said. As members discuss self-defense, they’ve also decided that they will not arm anyone at the church with any weapon.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Dispute leads to felony level charges

State - NY Police - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:07

On April 18, 2018 at about 10:51 p.m., New York State Police at Norwich arrested Christopher C. Ramey, age 37 of Port Crane, NY for the felonies of Assault in the 2nd and Reckless Endangerment in the 1st degree.  He was also charged with the misdemeanors of Criminal Mischief in the 4th degree and Reckless Endangerment in the 2nd degree. 

Categories: Law Enforcement

Crash in Owego leads to DWI arrest

State - NY Police - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:06

On April 19, 2018 at approximately 1:24 p.m., New York State Police at Owego arrested Corie E. Vandewater, age 35 of Buffalo, NY for the misdemeanor of Driving While Intoxicated with a reported B.A.C of .19%.  She was also issued several traffic tickets. 

 

Categories: Law Enforcement

Enfield man arrested with drugs

State - NY Police - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:04

On April 18, 2018 at about 7:40 p.m., New York State Police at Ithaca arrested Damien J. Vandemark, age 35 of Enfield, NY for three counts of the misdemeanor Criminal Possession in the 7th degree.  He was also charged with the violation of Unlawful Possession of Marihuana. 

Categories: Law Enforcement

Johnson City man arrested after gas drive off

State - NY Police - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:02

On April 18, 2018 at approximately 4:22 p.m., New York State Police at Binghamton arrested Ron W. Deats, age 24 of Johnson City, NY for two counts of the misdemeanor of Petit Larceny. 

Categories: Law Enforcement

Stony Brook man arrested for DWAI

State - NY Police - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 15:01

On April 18, 2018 at approximately 6:09 p.m., New York State Police at Deposit arrested Marco T. White, age 23, of Stony Brook, NY for the misdemeanor of Operating a Motor Vehicle While Impaired by Drugs. 

Categories: Law Enforcement

Barker man steals bottles and cans from donation box

State - NY Police - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 14:59

On April 19, 2018 at approximately 11:57 a.m., New York State Police at Norwich arrested John C. Dubrava, age 62 of Barker, NY for the misdemeanor of Petit Larceny.

Categories: Law Enforcement

Sheriff: 2 deputies fatally ambushed because of LE hatred

Police One - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 14:39

By Jason Dearen Associated Press

TRENTON, Fla. — Investigators in Florida say they may never know why a man - a recluse from a rural farm community who rarely ventured into town - killed two sheriff's deputies while they sat in a Chinese restaurant.

John Hubert Highnote, 58, of Bell casually walked into the restaurant, went up to the Gilchrest County deputies and fired at them. He then went into his car and killed himself.

"It's inexplicable," State Attorney Bill Cervone said. "People will want to know why, and we may never have an answer for them."

Highnote came from a small town just up the road from the Ace China restaurant in Trenton, about 35 miles (56 kilometers) west of Gainesville. He lived alone in a small, brick house off a dirt road shaded under a canopy of trees.

A neighbor who has lived across the street for five years said that Highnote never once introduced himself, and he was rarely seen in town. The only time she ever saw him was when he would drive his truck into the garage.

"I'd see him pull in, shut the garage and go in. No lights on or nothing," said the neighbor, who spoke on condition of anonymity because she did not want to be involved in the investigation. She characterized him as a recluse.

Gilchrest County Sheriff Bobby Schultz blamed the deaths of Sgt. Noel Ramirez, 30, and Deputy Taylor Lindsey, 25, on hatred toward law enforcement.

"What do you expect happens when you demonize law enforcement to the extent it's been demonized? Every type of hate, every type of put-down you can think of," Schultz said at a news conference.

"The only thing these men were guilty of is wanting to protect you and me. They just wanted to get something to eat, and they just wanted to do their job," he said.

President Donald Trump called the slain deputies "HEROES" in a tweet sharing his condolences with their friends, families and colleagues.

Court records show Highnote had one traffic ticket from 2012, but no other criminal or civil court record. Property records show he bought his house in 2010.

Schultz said state law enforcement officials are investigating, and an investigator from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement was at Highnote's house on Friday.

"Sgt. Ramirez and Deputy Lindsey were the best of the best," Schultz said. "They were men of integrity, men of loyalty. They were God-fearing, and they loved what they did, and we are very proud of them."

Schultz said he rushed to the scene, and then had the difficult task of calling the families of Ramirez, who is survived by his wife and two young children, and Lindsey, who joined the sheriff's office in 2013.

Jamie Mauldin, a waitress at Akins Bar-B-Q about a mile from Highnote's house in Bell said the town is devastated by the loss of the two deputies. She wore a freshly made T-shirt that said "Gilchrist Strong." The proceeds of the shirts will go to the deputies' families.

"Ramirez was the sweetest ever. He loved his family. Loved his job," she said. "Always had a smile."


Categories: Law Enforcement

Big Flats Troopers Arrest Manilus Woman for Drug Possession

State - NY Police - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 14:27
On April 18, 2018, Big Flats based State Police arrested a Manilus woman.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Judge tosses suit seeking to block parole of NY cop killer

Police One - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 14:12

Associated Press

ALBANY, N.Y. — A New York judge has dismissed a lawsuit that sought to block the parole of an ex-radical who fatally shot two New York City police officers in 1971.

State Supreme Court Justice Richard Koweek ruled Friday that the state Parole Board did not act irrationally or outside its bounds when it granted parole last month to Herman Bell after serving 44 years.

The 70-year-old Bell had been scheduled to be released this week before the legal challenge was filed by the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association on behalf of Diane Piagentini, widow of one of the slain officers. Her lawyers had argued the parole board didn't follow proper protocols.

Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday that while he disagreed with the decision, the Parole Board is independent and not under his control.


Categories: Law Enforcement

Authorities: Motive in killings of 2 Fla. deputies may never be known

Police One - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 13:54

By Jason Dearen Associated Press

TRENTON, Fla. — Investigators in Florida say they may never know why a man - a recluse from a rural farm community who rarely ventured into town - killed two sheriff's deputies while they sat in a Chinese restaurant.

John Hubert Highnote, 58, of Bell casually walked into the restaurant, went up to the Gilchrest County deputies and fired at them. He then went into his car and killed himself.

"It's inexplicable," State Attorney Bill Cervone said. "People will want to know why, and we may never have an answer for them."

Highnote came from a small town just up the road from the Ace China restaurant in Trenton, about 35 miles (56 kilometers) west of Gainesville. He lived alone in a small, brick house off a dirt road shaded under a canopy of trees.

A neighbor who has lived across the street for five years said that Highnote never once introduced himself, and he was rarely seen in town. The only time she ever saw him was when he would drive his truck into the garage.

"I'd see him pull in, shut the garage and go in. No lights on or nothing," said the neighbor, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the nature of the crime. She characterized him as a recluse.

Gilchrest County Sheriff Bobby Schultz blamed the deaths of Sgt. Noel Ramirez, 30, and Deputy Taylor Lindsey, 25, on hatred toward law enforcement.

"What do you expect happens when you demonize law enforcement to the extent it's been demonized? Every type of hate, every type of put-down you can think of," Schultz said at a news conference.

"The only thing these men were guilty of is wanting to protect you and me. They just wanted to get something to eat, and they just wanted to do their job," he said.

President Donald Trump called the slain deputies "HEROES" in a tweet sharing his condolences with their friends, families and colleagues.

Court records show Highnote had one traffic ticket from 2012, but no other criminal or civil court record. Property records show he bought his house in 2010.

Schultz said state law enforcement officials are investigating, and an investigator from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement was at Highnote's house on Friday.

"Sgt. Ramirez and Deputy Lindsey were the best of the best," Schultz said. "They were men of integrity, men of loyalty. They were God-fearing, and they loved what they did, and we are very proud of them."

Schultz said he rushed to the scene, and then had the difficult task of calling the families of Ramirez, who is survived by his wife and two young children, and Lindsey, who joined the sheriff's office in 2013.

Jamie Mauldin, a waitress at Akins Bar-B-Q about a mile from Highnote's house in Bell said the town is devastated by the loss of the two deputies. She wore a freshly made T-shirt that said "Gilchrist Strong." The proceeds of the shirts will go to the deputies' families.

"Ramirez was the sweetest ever. He loved his family. Loved his job," she said. "Always had a smile."


Categories: Law Enforcement

W.Va. officer buys diapers with own money for mother in need

Police One - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 13:27

By PoliceOne Staff CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A West Virginia officer is being recognized after helping a mother in need.

On April 14, Cpl. Jamie Wilson was responding to a domestic complaint at an apartment complex when he encountered the mother, WVAH reports. Wilson learned that the mother’s live-in boyfriend had taken money from her, leaving her unable to buy diapers for her child.

Wilson said he acted like any officer and father would and bought the mother some diapers and wipes for her baby.

"I'm here like any other dad and doing the right thing is just doing the right thing regardless of whether you wear a uniform or not," Wilson said.

Wilson’s kind act was recognized by the Charleston Police Department in a Facebook post. Wilson said he didn’t do anything special and that he was just helping out a parent.

"If there's anything within our power that we can do to help and assist and even get a parent to the proper channels to help them get other help that they need, we'll definitely be there for them," Wilson said.

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On Saturday April 14, 2018 Cpl. Jamie Wilson responded to a domestic complaint at Vandalia Apartments. Upon arrival Cpl....

Posted by Charleston Police Department Community Services on Thursday, April 19, 2018


Categories: Law Enforcement

Lawmaker calls for death penalty after Mass. LEO’s death

Police One - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 13:24

By PoliceOne Staff

BOSTON — A Massachusetts sergeant’s death has led to one lawmaker calling for the death penalty for anyone who kills law enforcement officers.

CBS Boston reports that Rep. Shaunna O’Connell said it’s time for the state to send a clear message to anyone who kills an LEO. The call comes after the death of Sgt. Sean Gannon, who was killed while serving a warrant last week.

“We’re talking about a very small part of the population. Cop killers. The worst criminals among us. If you’re going to kill a cop, we need to send a message you’re going to face that same fate,” O’Connell said.

Gov. Charlie Baker also supports the idea, saying officers put their lives at risk every day. But some Democratic lawmakers oppose re-opening the debate, according to the Associated Press.

"I am personally opposed to the death penalty and I do not foresee Massachusetts reinstating capital punishment," Senate President Harriette Chandler, a Worcester Democrat, said. "That being said, the death of Officer Sean Gannon is a heartbreaking tragedy and I hope that the justice system enacts swift punishment to those responsible."

O’Connell said giving someone life without parole isn’t enough punishment and is more dangerous.

“When you kill a cop you go to jail and you’re a hero in that prison. It puts the lives of corrections officers in great danger because these people have nothing to lose. They’re in for life without parole. What’s to stop them from trying to kill a department of corrections officer as well?” O’Connell said.

Brian Kyes, president of the Massachusetts Major City Chiefs of Police Association, said his “knee-jerk” reaction would be to support the death penalty, but added that the association would discuss possible legislation sometime after Gannon’s funeral, which was Wednesday.

The state hasn’t executed someone since 1947. Lawmakers debated reinstating capital punishment after the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, but it was ultimately shelved.


Categories: Law Enforcement

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