Law Enforcement

Off-Duty New Jersey Officer Killed in Traffic Collision

Police Magazine - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 14:04

An off-duty Hillside (NJ) police officer was killed and another person seriously injured early Monday when an SUV collided with a tractor-trailer truck, according to NJ.com.

Officer Giovanni Esposito was hired by the Hillside Police Department in November 2017 after graduating at the top of his class from the Essex County Police Academy, according to Chief Vincent Ricciardi.

Chief Ricciardi said in a statement on Facebook, "Officer Esposito loved his job and was a warm and friendly person who was well-liked by all who knew him. Officer Esposito loved his job and was a warm and friendly person who was well-liked by all who knew him."

The department said further, "He prided himself on serving the community of Hillside with diligence and compassion. His death is a profound loss to our department and we will miss him terribly. We wish his family solace and comfort during this extremely difficult time."

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Hurricane Michael Looter Fatally Shot Trying to Steal Police Cruiser

Police Magazine - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 14:01

A man suspected of looting in hurricane-ravaged Panama City (FL) was shot and killed after he attempted to steal a police car, according to WEAR-TV News.

Panama City was severely damaged by the storm, and residents there are seeing evidence of widespread looting despite a dusk-to-dawn curfew.

WEAR News reports that a man who had been looting at a store was seen getting into a police officer's SUV and shutting the door.

Officers with Florida State Fire Marshals then opened fire, fatally wounding the man.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating the shooting incident.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Texas Police Sergeant Arrested on Charge of Injury to a Child

Police Magazine - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:59

A police sergeant with the Dallas (TX) Police Department was arrested on a felony charge of injury to a child, after nearby Royse City (TX) police investigated a complaint that she had hit her eight-year-old daughter.

Sergeant Jamie McDonald was charged with Injury to a Child (Felony of the First Degree), the department said in a Tweet. The department did not release any details about the incident that led to McDonald's arrest.

According to the Dallas Morning News, McDonald's ex-husband told police that when he picked up his daughter Thursday—after the couple's children had been in McDonald's care—the girl had bruising on her face.

McDonald—who joined the Dallas Police Department in September 2002—has been placed on administrative leave during the investigation.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Responders Describe Grief, Sorrow After Deadly Upstate New York Limo Crash

Officer.com - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:56
The firefighters, police officers and EMTs described sleepless nights and persistent memories.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Auburn man gets arrested for UPM.

State - NY Police - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:42
On October 15, 2018, Troopers out of SP Auburn arrested Alfred J. Guido, 51, of Auburn, New York for unlawful possession of marijuana.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Dunkirk man gets arrested for DWI and CPCS in Williamson.

State - NY Police - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:39
On October 14, 2018, Troopers out of SP Williamson arrested Gerardo A. Figueroa, 45, of Dunkirk, New York for driving while intoxicated, operating a motor vehicle with a BAC greater than .08%, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, possession of an open container, speeding and criminal possession of a controlled substance.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Amsterdam NY man arrested for possession of Marihuana, Cocaine, LSD and MDMA subsequent to a traffic stop.

State - NY Police - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:37
State Police report the arrest of Vincenzo Lam, age 26, of Amsterdam, NY, for Criminal Use of Drug Paraphernalia 2nd, Criminal Possession of Marihuana 3rd, Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance 3rd, 4th, 7th.

 

Categories: Law Enforcement

What the New DuPont Gallery Exhibit at National Law Enforcement Museum Features

Officer.com - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:28
Kevlar® Honors those who Serve and Protect our Communities
Categories: Law Enforcement

Auburn man gets arrested for DWI.

State - NY Police - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:22
On October 14, 2018, Troopers out of SP Auburn arrested Michael T. Obrien, 33, of Auburn, New York for driving while intoxicated, operating a motor vehicle with a BAC greater than .08%, moving from the lane unsafely and unlawful possession of marijuana.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Auburn woman gets arrested for DWI.

State - NY Police - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:16
On October 14, 2018, Troopers out of SP Auburn arrested Delia J. Randall, 38, of Auburn, New York for driving while intoxicated, operating a motor vehicle with a BAC greater than .08%, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, operating a motor vehicle without a valid inspection certificate, insufficient turn signal (less than 100 feet) and inadequate plate light.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Wolcott man gets arrested for DWI.

State - NY Police - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:43
On October 13, 2018, Troopers out of SP Williamson arrested German Tribio-Lucio, 26, of Wolcott, New York for driving while intoxicated, operating a motor vehicle with a BAC greater than .08%, possession of an open container, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, leaving the scene of a property damage accident and unsafe backing.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Mich. police to file criminal complaint after fetus remains found

Police One - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:34

Author: Heather R. Cotter

Associated Press DETROIT — Police in Detroit said they would file a criminal complaint against the owners after the remains of 10 fetuses and one infant were found hidden in a former funeral home that had lost its license when decomposing embalmed bodies were found there earlier this year.

A criminal complaint will be opened against the owners of Cantrell Funeral Home, Police Chief James Craig said Monday.

The Associated Press was unable Monday to find a telephone listing for Raymond Cantrell who owned the funeral home when its license was suspended in April.

An anonymous letter led state inspectors Friday to the decomposed remains hidden between the eastside building's first and second floors.

The fetuses were found together in a cardboard-like box while the full-term infant was in a coffin, Craig said.

"They were definitely hidden," Craig told The AP. "The way they were placed in ceiling, one would not have readily discovered them. In 41½ years in policing, this is first time I've heard of anything like this."

The remains were taken to the Wayne County medical examiner's office which is coordinating efforts with authorities "to hopefully get them identified and families identified," spokeswoman Lisa Croff said in a text message. "We have very little to go on (without) cooperation from the funeral home owners. Everything is under investigation."

No arrests have been made.

Cantrell Funeral Home was shut down and had its mortuary license suspended in April after decomposing embalmed bodies were found and other violations were discovered. The suspension has not been appealed and the investigation from earlier this year remains ongoing, said Jason Moon, a spokesman for Michigan's Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.

Those violations include two improperly stored bodies covered in what appeared to be mold and a third body with unknown fluids covering the facial area. Inspections also turned up an unsanitary embalming room.

The establishment also was operating with an expired prepaid funeral and cemetery sales registration. The state says money for prepaid funeral goods or services had not been deposited with an authorized escrow agent within 30 days of receipt.

Raymond Cantrell told reporters at the time that some bodies were stored in the garage "so that we wouldn't have an aroma filling up the funeral home."

"If I had them in the funeral home, then my funeral home would not smell fresh," he said.

The building has a new owner.


Categories: Law Enforcement

State, city police join probe into infant remains at Mich. funeral home

Police One - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:34

Associated Press DETROIT — State and city police and other officials are investigating how the remains of 11 infants ended up in the ceiling of a former funeral home in Detroit.

Spokesman Jason Moon said Monday that Michigan Licensing and Regulatory Affairs is working with the state attorney general to gather information about Cantrell Funeral Home.

An anonymous letter led inspectors Friday to the decomposed remains hidden between the building's first and second floors.

Wayne County medical examiner spokeswoman Lisa Croff says authorities are trying to identify the babies' families. The funeral home's owners are not cooperating and are not under arrest.

Decomposing bodies and other violations led to the business being closed in April and its license suspended. Moon says the suspension wasn't appealed.

The building has a new owner.


Categories: Law Enforcement

Do You Know the Next HAIX Hero of the Month?

Police Magazine - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:33

What do Ptl. Travis Goodson of the Albany (GA) Police Department and former Dallas SWAT officer Michael Witzgall have in common other than service as law enforcement officers? They both have been honored as the HAIX Hero of the Month. Goodson was the July HAIX Hero and Witzgall was the April HAIX Hero.

Now it's time for you to nominate the October HAIX Hero of the Month. Goodson was honored for his community service. Witzgall was honored for his work training fellow officers. Do you know officers who are performing equally heroic acts? If so, submit their nomination for the next HAIX Hero of the Month.

The HAIX Hero of the Month program is a feature on the Facebook Page of POLICE Magazine. Fellow officers, supervisors, community members in the jurisdiction the officer serves, friends, and family members can nominate officers to be honored. A panel of judges will then consider each entry and name three officers to compete for HAIX Hero of the Month honors. Each officer selected will have his or her story featured on POLICE Magazine's Facebook page where people who come to the page can register "Likes." Each officer's story will be featured on the page for one week. At the end of the month, the officer with the most "Likes" will be named HAIX Hero of the Month. HAIX will award a pair of boots to the HAIX Hero of the Month.

The first nominee was named Friday October 12. HAIX is looking for two more heroes to consider for October honors. Click here  and nominate your hero today.

 

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Categories: Law Enforcement

Why LE agencies should create a mental health agency liaison officer position

Police One - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:03

Author: American Military University

By Dr. Chuck Russo, Program Director of Criminal Justice at American Military University, Jeremy Nikolow, alumnus, Criminal Justice, American Military University and Carrie Courtney, Contributor to In Public Safety

On a daily basis, law enforcement officers (LEOs) encounter individuals displaying mental health symptomology. It is unfortunate that typically the public only hears about law enforcement’s adverse interactions with those diagnosed with mental illness; such as when things go awry and negative outcomes occur. When these situations occur, LEOs are forced to respond to media inquiries and social media hype in real time. In both their message and rhetoric, law enforcement can come across as defensive. This does not have to be the case. Law enforcement can get ahead of these encounters by partnering with others in the mental health community. To do so, it would be beneficial to create the position of a mental health agency liaison officer.

What is a mental health agency liaison officer?

In this designated role, the mental health agency liaison officer serves as a link between law enforcement entities, mental health agencies, substance abuse agencies and local social service agencies. This includes for-profit and non-profit community-based mental health agencies in each district and jurisdiction.

As many mental health agency meetings and events are held during “normal business hours,” it may be best to designate an administrative member of the law enforcement agency as the mental health agency liaison officer. An administrative sergeant, lieutenant or higher ranked individual, free of the needs to respond to calls for service, should have the time to attend the necessary meetings and events that would be required for such a position.

The officer would work in partnership with symbiotic agencies on tasks such as psycho-education, networking, public awareness, public safety, outreach events and the facilitation of referrals between agencies. They would also help foster and sustain a positive relationship between law enforcement agencies, the local government, mental health agencies, vocational rehabilitation services and additional social service agencies.

The mental health agency liaison officer would serve as an advocate by attending and participating in law enforcement, mental health and substance abuse agencies board meetings. In addition, he or she would actively serve on participating agencies board of directors, as requested.

In Volusia County, Florida, for example, there are multiple mental health agencies and social service providers. Through the designation of one individual as the mental health agency liaison officer between law enforcement and mental health, substance abuse and social service agencies, the flow of internal and external communication would improve, thereby facilitating a positive alliance among all participants. Oversight provided by the mental health agency liaison officer would demonstrate the effectiveness and importance of their alliance by fostering solutions and decreasing the perpetuation of myths and negative community-based perceptions.

The benefits of a mental health agency liaison officer

One of the many goals of the mental health agency liaison officer would be to increase familiarity among LEOs and mental health, substance abuse and social service providers. By putting a LEO presence in a constant advocacy role for those experiencing mental illness and substance abuse issues, all of the internal and external participants would work together cohesively to facilitate a united partnership. As such, the mental health agency liaison officer would create enhanced positive interactions between LEOs and those diagnosed with mental illness and substance abuse and dependence issues.

A collaborative approach could also help provide education to law enforcement about how “best” to approach a person with mental health needs and how to avoid exacerbating the situation. For example, there have been well-defined links between mental health and drug usage, anger issues, crime and even homelessness. While law enforcement may seek a strict deterrent for drug or anger issues (e.g., incarceration), mental health agencies may be able to weigh in with a more rehabilitative approach (e.g., drug treatment or anger management) that would help reduce these “flare-ups” from people with mental health issues.

In addition, the mental health agency liaison officer can provide a singular voice to mental health agencies on many issues and concerns from a law enforcement standpoint. A uniform and consistent message on these issues can help to standardize the process and response from law enforcement to mental health issues. This makes it easier for mental health agencies to understand and know what to expect from law enforcement’s response to client issues and concerns. It can also lead to future support of these same issues and concerns. If law enforcement and mental health agencies support each other in their respective roles, it could go a long way in quelling concerns in the event of public scrutiny.

The mental health agency liaison officer could also serve as a key figure in integrating fiscal needs among mental health, substance abuse and social service agencies by bringing grant revenue and other funding sources to the attention of these agencies (e.g., utilizing Veterans Affairs for military veterans with mental health needs and pharmaceutical companies for substance abuse clients). As a “neutral” third party, the mental health agency liaison officer could connect previously disjointed agencies that are often consistently in desperate need of funding and additional resources to serve the complex needs of their clientele.

By designating an individual as the mental health agency liaison officer, law enforcement agencies would demonstrate an active willingness to partner with mental health, substance abuse and social service agencies. This will serve as a targeted effort to provide innovative solutions to assist those diagnosed with mental illness and substance abuse/dependence issues.

The mental health agency liaison officer could become an integral problem solver in the mental health and substance abuse community by working interdependently with each agency to provide reliable support and collaborative, functional resources for individuals and families suffering from the disorderly destruction associated with mental illness and substance abuse. In addition, the mental health agency liaison officer will provide supportive assistance for individuals and agencies addressing mental health symptomology. This cooperative support will bring community-wide mental health and substance abuse assistance, while addressing the plethora of concerns associated with these diagnoses.

About the authors: Dr. Chuck Russo is the program director of Criminal Justice at American Military University. He began his career in law enforcement in 1987 in Central Florida and was involved all areas of patrol, training, special operations and investigations before retiring from law enforcement in 2013. Dr. Russo continues to design and instruct courses, as well as act as a consultant for education, government and industry throughout the world. His recent research and presentations focus on emerging technology and law enforcement applications, post-traumatic stress, nongovernment intelligence actors, and online learning.

Jeremy Nikolow, MS, is a police lieutenant with a large Central Florida agency and adjunct faculty with colleges and universities. His law enforcement career began in 2005 and he has involved several areas of patrol, investigations, motors, SWAT and specialized operations. Jeremy presently serves as watch commander. He graduated from American Military University in 2012 earning his Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice.

Carrie Courtney, MSW, is the former grant specialist for a large Central Florida law enforcement agency. She was a founding member of the agency’s Critical Incident Stress Management Team, as well as a team member of other state and district teams. She was contracted by the Bureau of Justice Assistance to review grants on a federal level. She is a member of the Florida Crisis Consortium, as well as a board member of a mental health organization, and the outgoing president of the Mental Health Association. She specialized in trauma and devoted most of her career to working with adult and children who experienced severe trauma.

To contact these authors, email IPSauthor@apus.edu. For more articles featuring insight from industry experts, subscribe to In Public Safety’s bi-monthly newsletter.


Categories: Law Enforcement

Suffolk County Police Department (NY)

Law Enforcement LODD - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:00
Sergeant Dennis Reichardt died as the result of cancer he developed after spending three months searching through debris at the site of the World Trade Center and the Fresh Kills...

Elbridge woman gets arrested for aggravated DWI.

State - NY Police - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 11:47
On October 13, 2018, Troopers out of SP Auburn arrested Jessica G. Foote, 38, of Elbridge, New York for driving while intoxicated, aggravated driving while intoxicated and failure to keep right.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Bronx man gets arrested for DWI in Aurelius.

State - NY Police - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 11:43
On October 13, 2018, Troopers out of SP Auburn arrested Reg C. Mangru, 23, of Bronx, New York for driving while intoxicated, operating a motor vehicle with a BAC greater than .08%, possession of an open container and a seat belt violation.
Categories: Law Enforcement

Pennsylvania Department of Corrections (PA)

Law Enforcement LODD - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 11:39
Corrections Officer Mark Gaspich suffered a fatal heart attack after climbing two ladders to reach the observation platform of a guard tower at SCI Camp Hill. He began to feel ill...

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