ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Ultralight plane crashes into Moosehead Lake, pilot escapes injury

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:40

by WGME

ROCKWOOD (WGME) — A Massachusetts man practicing takeoffs over Moosehead Lake crashed an ultralight plane Saturday morning but avoided injury.

Rockwood Fire and Rescue Chief Del Hume said he watched the plane go down around 10 a.m. Saturday after the ultralight lost power.

The plane is a total loss after it broke up upon impact.

Someone on a jet ski pulled the pilot out of the plane. The pilot was wearing a life jacket, Hume said.

Hume was able to pull the plane to shore with a rope.

The pilot took off from a boat launch on Village Road in his new ultralight, getting about 20 feet off the ground, witnesses told Hume.

https://wgme.com/news/local/ultralight-plane-crashes-into-moosehead-lake-pilot-escapes-injury

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Small seaplane crashes at Burlingame State Park

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:39

by: Jacqui GomersallCourtney Carter

CHARLESTOWN, R.I. (WPRI) — The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating after a small seaplane crashed in Watchaug Pond at Burlingame State Park.

A 911 came into Department of Environmental Police at 5:08 p.m. Saturday from a Charlestown resident who witnessed the crash, according to a spokesperson for the state agency.

Both people on board were not injured.

The pilot has been identified as Bryant Hassett, 26, of Connecticut. Rhode Island DEM said the plane is registered to Mark Simmons, of Connecticut.

Simmons was not on board, but DEM said his 16-year-old son was the passenger.

The FAA was on the scene Saturday. DEM expects the plane to be salvaged on Sunday. They do not believe there has been any major fuel leak, but will continue to monitor the wreck.

DEM said they believe the pilot forgot to raise the plane’s wheels after taking off from Westerly State Airport. The landing gear then caught water while trying to land on the pond, which caused the plane to flip.

https://www.wpri.com/news/local-news/small-plane-crashes-at-burlingame-state-park/

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Flights from Yangon cancelled due to landing mishap

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:38

KANG WAN CHERN

All flights departing Yangon International Airport have been cancelled since 4.30pm today, passengers stranded at the airport told The Myanmar Times

They said the runway has been shut down but no reason was given to passengers, hundreds of whom have been forced to reschedule their flights due to the inconvenience. 

The Myanmar Times understands that the nose wheel of a Golden Myanmar Airlines Y5-506 ATR-72-600 aircraft broke while landing at the airport, Xinhua quoted officials of the Department of Civil Aviation as saying.

Some 70 passengers were on board the Mandalay-Yangon flight. No casualties were reported.

A spokesperson from the airport said operations have resumed at 6.30pm.

The crash marks the third such incident for the Myanmar aviation industry this year.

On May 8, a Biman Bangladesh Airlines aircraft carrying 30 passengers and 6 crew skidded and overran the runway on landing at Yangon International Airport due to heavy rain and poor visibility. Local media reported that 19 people were injured.

Four days later in Mandalay, a Myanmar National Airline plane made an emergency landing after its nose wheel failed to extend. There were no injuries.

https://www.mmtimes.com/news/flights-yangon-cancelled-due-landing-mishap.html

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:35

35 Years ago today: On 5 August 1984 a Biman Bangladesh Airlines Fokker F-27 Friendship 600 crashed near Dhaka, killing all 49 occupants.

Date: Sunday 5 August 1984 Type: Fokker F-27 Friendship 600 Operator: Biman Bangladesh Airlines Registration: S2-ABJ C/n / msn: 10453 First flight: 1971 Total airframe hrs: 15595 Cycles: 24085 Crew: Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4 Passengers: Fatalities: 45 / Occupants: 45 Total: Fatalities: 49 / Occupants: 49 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 0,5 km (0.3 mls) NW of Dhaka-Zia International Airport (DAC) (   Bangladesh) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Chittagong-Patenga Airport (CGP/VGEG), Bangladesh Destination airport: Dhaka-Zia International Airport (DAC/VGZR), Bangladesh

Narrative:
The F-27 crew first tried to make a VOR approach to runway 32. Since they didn’t see the runway, a missed approach was executed. The crew then tried to make an ILS approach for runway 14. Again a missed approach was executed. On the second attempt for runway 14, the aircraft crashed into the water, 550 m short of the runway threshold.

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Today is Friday the 2nd of August, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 08/02/2019 - 06:11

We close out the week with these stories…

Have a great weekend and be safe out there!

Tom

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‘Hard landing’ at Marin County Airport injures flier

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 08/02/2019 - 06:08

By GARY KLIEN

A small plane carrying three passengers lost part of its landing gear Thursday during a rocky arrival at the Marin County Airport in

A Cessna rests in a median at the Marin County Airport in Novato after a landing mishap on Aug. 1, 2019. (Alan Dep/Marin Independent Journal)

Novato.

The incident was reported as a plane crash at about 4:30 p.m. The sheriff’s department later described it as a “hard landing.”

Novato fire Battalion Chief Gerald McCarthy said the plane came down on the runway, went back up in the air and sheared its front landing gear when it came down again. With its nose damaged, the plan veered off the runway and stopped in a grassy median strip.

McCarthy said medics evaluated the three occupants for injuries. One was taken to Novato Community Hospital for treatment of minor injuries, while the others declined further treatment.

No fuel leaked from the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified about the crash. According to FAA records, the plane is a Cessna P210N manufactured in 1981 and registered to a company in San Francisco.

https://www.marinij.com/2019/08/01/plane-crashes-at-marin-county-airport-in-novato/

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Small plane lands on Washington state road, shocking drivers

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 08/02/2019 - 06:06

PARKLAND, Wash. (AP) — PARKLAND, Wash. (AP) — Authorities say a small plane landed on a busy stretch of road in Washington state, stunning drivers but hurting no one.

The Washington State Patrol says the single-propeller KR2 aircraft landed Thursday on the street in the city of Parkland, south of Tacoma.

Trooper Johnna Batiste says the pilot was able to land during a break in traffic after a fuel system malfunction caused the plane to stall. Video shows it stopping just before an intersection.

Driver Dennis Diessner told Seattle TV station KOMO that the plane came so close to his car that he thought he could have reached out and touched it. He says he pulled over to make sure the pilot was OK.

Batiste says a trooper who was nearby helped the pilot push the plane into a parking lot.

https://www.kktv.com/content/news/513514662.html?fbclid=IwAR1IM18kWLcRMAxt1tu265o7bBhi09HUWRjUDdaJURDETdT0GHjA-xVcvxg

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Navy Declares Pilot in Death Valley Super Hornet Crash Dead

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 08/02/2019 - 06:04

By: Sam LaGrone

The pilot of a single-seat F/A-18E fighter that crashed on Wednesday has been declared dead, Navy officials said Thursday afternoon.

“The Navy has confirmed that the pilot of the F/A-18E Super Hornet that crashed July 31st died in the crash,” spokeswoman Lt. Cmdr. Lydia Bock told USNI News in a statement.
“The identity of the pilot will be withheld until 24 hours following notification of next of kin. The Navy mourns the loss of one of our own, and our hearts go out to the family and friends affected by this tragedy.”

The Super Hornet assigned to the “Vigilantes” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151, based at Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif., crashed at about 10 a.m. local time in the so-called “Star Wars Valley” – a popular spot for military aviation photographers in the Death Valley National Park.

A Navy summary of the crash reviewed by USNI News said the aircraft impacted against the side of the canyon wall during low altitude training.

The National Park Service told reporters that seven people suffered minor injuries as a result of the crash.

Eye-witness accounts said the aircraft had run into the canyon wall at high speed, creating a mushroom cloud that could be seen for miles in the surrounding desert. They did not see the pilot eject. Images from the scene show a dark patch on the canyon wall where the fighter is believed to have hit.

The incident is now under investigation.

VFA-151 is part of Carrier Air Wing 9, which returned to California earlier this year after completing a deployment aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74).

The fighter crash follows a November two-seat Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet crash in the Philippine Sea. Both aviators were recovered safely.

In December, a two-seat Marine F/A-18D Hornet crashed during an aerial refueling operation off the coast of Japan. The Hornet pilot and the five Marines aboard KC-130J refueler were killed.

The following is the complete Navy Aug. 1 statement on the crash.

The Navy has confirmed that the pilot of the F/A-18E Super Hornet that crashed July 31st died in the crash. In accordance with Department of Defense policy, the identity of the pilot will be withheld until 24 hours following notification of next of kin. The Navy mourns the loss of one of our own and our hearts go out to the family and friends affected by this tragedy.

https://news.usni.org/2019/08/01/navy-declares-pilot-in-death-valley-super-hornet-crash-dead

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Lack of oxygen likely caused fatal plane crash near Calgary, says TSB report

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 08/02/2019 - 06:02

THE CANADIAN PRESS

A lack of oxygen likely played a role in a plane crash southwest of Calgary that killed two people, an investigation by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada found.

The board said in a report released Thursday that hypoxia, or in-flight oxygen deprivation, caused the pilot to lose control before the plane crashed into rugged terrain in the Kananaskis area of Alberta on Aug. 1, 2018. 

The pilot flying the Piper PA-31 Navajo was headed to the Springbank Airport near Calgary with a survey technician.

The aircraft’s right engine began operating at a significantly lower power setting than the left engine when the pilot was approaching the airport, said the board.

Investigators could not determine why this happened.

“About 90 seconds later, at approximately 13,500 feet (4,115 metres), the aircraft departed controlled flight,” the report said. “The aircraft collided with terrain near the summit of Mount Rae.”

Although a portable oxygen system was available on the plane, the pilot was not continuously using it in the high altitude, which the board said is required by regulation.

The board also found that flight crews with Aries Aviation, the company that owned and operated the aircraft, only undergo theoretical hypoxia training.

Aries is not required by law to provide practical training and the report noted there is a risk pilots will not recognize early symptoms in higher altitudes.

“Although certain hypoxia effects may become more noticeable than others as an aircraft ascends, associated changes to a pilot’s sense of self, motivation, willpower and wellness often overshadow the ability to identify performance degradation in themselves,” the report said.

“In fact, a pilot who is in a hypoxic state may actually experience euphoria. Even sensory effects, such as darkening of the visual field, may become noticeable to individuals only after they begin … using oxygen or descending to a lower altitude.”

The aircraft was not required to have a flight data recorder or cockpit voice recorder, the board said.

“However, the aircraft was equipped with a flight data monitoring system that included a camera,” the board said in a statement Tuesday.

“This system provided significant information to help TSB investigators better understand the underlying factors that contributed to the accident.”

— By Daniela Germano in Edmonton

https://vancouversun.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/lack-of-oxygen-likely-caused-fatal-plane-crash-near-calgary-tsb-report-says-2/wcm/a2b3d2c0-b67e-4a3d-b94a-44e5805bf3b4

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Part 2: “Disregarding Orders” In DE & The Report (The Secret List)

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 08/02/2019 - 06:00

Hey,
I love Ben Franklin. I have spent the better part of my life reading his stuff and the stuff that’s been written about him. Ben Franklin himself had no shortage of his own quotes as well:

“Who is wise? He that learns from everyone.” (Ben Franklin, Firefighter, Smart Guy)

When we started Firefighter Close Calls & The Secret List, the goal has always been for all of us to learn. And we once again have a chance to learn.

Last night we shared information from a media article about that fire in Mill Creek, Delaware that left Miquas Captain Dave Smiley seriously burned. He has still not returned to his full-time job due to his injuries.

Dave reached out last night and shared with me his perspective of what happened with him and his crew specifically, and how it happened in comparison to the media newspaper article as well as what the state report identified (the report link is below). I asked if I could share his comments with members of The Secret List and he enthusiastically responded with a yes!

So here ya go:

“I have spent the better part of the past 24 hours browsing through Facebook and reading what everyone has said about myself, my crew, my company, etc.

With that being said, there is one thing that bothers me more than others, and one thing I am going to comment on and clarify. For everyone who has read the recently posted article, and has not read the 87-page report, seen the helmet cam footage, or listened to the audio, please just wait before you make assumptions.

Yesterday’s article was written in a somewhat misleading sense in some aspects, and one of the biggest things I have an issue with is the “disregard for orders” statement. I led my crew to perform the role of the second due special service company on March 14th. Upon arriving at the front door command requested we ladder the Charlie and Delta sides. I made the decision to split my crew into a search group of four, and an exterior group of three. At that time my exterior team dumped every ladder bed of on scene apparatus, with some help from others.

Upon forcing and entering the front door, my mind set was strictly on searching the bedrooms, as an Ambulance had arrived on scene first to find fire showing, with no one outside, and locked doors (reporting “unknown occupancy”). I made my way to the second floor right around the time that the Engine Company ran out of water, and decided to search what I thought was a smoldering bedroom. While completing my search, Command advised his Engine crew that they were out of water and stated “21-6 back out for a second, 21-6 back out for a second”, leaving myself and my crew on the second floor of the house with no hose crew immediately ready. At this point I was finishing up my search and in my mind I decided that we were going to back down to the landing to wait for an Engine Company, with water in their hose line, but I never made it that far.

Approximately 5 seconds after Command ordered his Engine Company to “back out for a second” I fell through the floor. The crew of Rescue Company 23 and Ladder Company 16 attempted to pull me out of the floor, while also attempting to extinguish my burning body with the water cans we brought with us.

At no point did myself nor the members of my crew disregard any evacuation order, I was just simply attempting to complete my assigned role to the best of my ability. After the mayday had been called, and when I was walking to the stretcher is when Command ordered an orderly evacuation that went unfollowed, followed by multiple other evacuation orders.

My crew, and Ladder 16’s crew, did not play a part in any type of insubordination, and I wanted to make this clear for everybody. These guys risked their lives for me that day, and to see them getting blasted due to a poorly written media article, with a misleading title, is devastating to me. They are my actual heroes. Nobody from my crew was freelancing, nobody did not leave when they were told to, the special services were just simply trying to do their jobs. Thank you,
Dave Smiley”

Thank you Captain. As always, lots to learn-we encourage everyone to download the report and use it as a comparison to see how yours/mine/our fire departments could or would do.

Questions such as:

-Who commands your fires? What is their training & qualifications?

-What are your (and your mutual aid partners) command policies?

-Does your personnel accountability system work or not? Work is defined as the system being respected, used and provides “instant info” when there is a MAYDAY.

-Do you run a disciplined fireground where everyone is doing what the commander expects and wants?

-Do your members train on the latest modern and historical information related to fire behavior?
-Do you have a standard size up radio report?

-Is communicating on your fireground easy or a challenge? Why?

-Are your department policies clear, understandable and what your members train on?
-Where are your department policies?

-Can everyone access your policies at anytime? Are they always up to date?

-What are the qualifications of your apparatus operators and how often do they train?

-Where does your water come from (look at anywhere in your district)?

-Is your fireground tightly disciplined so that the IC “knows” that what needs to get done, is being done?

-Do your policies cover PPE and what can and cannot be worn on the fireground? Does your policy and training identify HOW PPE is expected to be worn and used?

-Alarm Assignments-Does your department have adequate response for the first alarm? Can you assure a turnout of about 30 firefighting personnel (including qualified commanders) in the amount of time it takes to make a difference to the victims? The fire?

Please take time to read the report and use it as a tool to affirm and or improve your department and regional operations.

HERE is the REPORT: https://statefireschool.delaware.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/114/2019/08/Mill-Creek-Incident-Review-Report-2019.pdf

And for those of you who are Ben Franklin fans:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vM09UBbQA9I
Take Care. Be Careful. Pass it On.
BillyG
The Secret List 8/1/2019-1415 Hours
www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 08/02/2019 - 05:58

34 Years ago today: On 2 August 1985 a Delta Air Lines Lockheed L-1011 TriStar 1 crashed at Dallas, TX due to windshear; killing 134 out of 163 occupants.

Date: Friday 2 August 1985 Time: 18:05 Type: Lockheed L-1011 TriStar 1 Operator: Delta Air Lines Registration: N726DA C/n / msn: 1163 First flight: 1979 Total airframe hrs: 20555 Cycles: 11186 Engines:Rolls-Royce RB211-22B Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 11 Passengers: Fatalities: 126 / Occupants: 152 Total: Fatalities: 134 / Occupants: 163 Ground casualties: Fatalities: 1 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, TX (DFW) (   United States of America) Crash site elevation: 185 m (607 feet) amsl Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Fort Lauderdale International Airport, FL (FLL/KFLL), United States of America Destination airport: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, TX (DFW/KDFW), United States of America Flightnumber: DL191

Narrative:
Delta Air Lines flight 191 was a regularly scheduled passenger flight between Fort Lauderdale, FL (FLL), and Los Angeles, CA (LAX), with an en route stop at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, TX (DFW). Flight 191, a Lockheed L-1011 TriStar airplane, departed Fort Lauderdale on an IFR flight plan with 152 passengers and a crew of 11 on board at 15:10 EDT. The DFW Airport terminal weather forecast contained in the flightcrew’s dispatch document package stated, in part, that there was a possibility of widely scattered rain showers and thunderstorms, becoming isolated after 20:00 CDT.
The flight was uneventful until passing New Orleans, Louisiana. A line of weather along the Texas-Louisiana gulf coast had intensified. The flightcrew elected to change their route of flight to the more northerly Blue Ridge arrival route to avoid the developing weather to the south. This change necessitated a 10 to 15-minute hold at the Texarkana, Arkansas, VORTAC for arrival sequencing at the DFW Airport. At 17:35, the flightcrew received the following ATIS broadcast: “DFW arrival information romeo, two one four seven Greenwich, weather six thousand scattered, two one thousand scattered, visibility one zero, temperature one zero one, dew point six seven, wind calm, altimeter two niner niner two, runway one eight right one seven left, visual approaches in progress, advise approach control that you have romeo”.
Fort Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) then cleared flight 191 to the Blue Ridge, Texas, VORTAC for the Blue Ridge Nine arrival, and to begin its descent. At 17:43:45, Fort Worth ARTCC cleared flight 191 to descend to 10,000 feet, gave it a 29.92 in Hg altimeter setting, and suggested that the flight turn to a heading-of 250 degrees “to join the Blue Ridge zero one zero radial inbound and we have a good area there to go through.!’ The captain replied that he was looking at a “pretty good size” weather cell, “at a heading of two five five … and I’d rather not go through it, I’d rather go around it one way or the other.” Fort Worth ARTCC then gave the flight another heading and stated “when I can I’ll turn you into Blue Ridge, it’ll be about the zero one zero radial.”
At 17:46, the center cleared flight 191 direct to Blue Ridge and to descend to 9,000 feet, and flight 191 acknowledged receipt of the clearance. At 17:48, the captain told the first officer, “You’re in good shape. I’m glad we didn’t have to go through that mess. I thought sure he was going to send us through it.” Three minutes later, the flight engineer said, “Looks like it’s raining over Fort Worth.”
At 17:51, Forth Worth ARTCC instructed flight 191 to contact DFW Airport Approach Control. At 17:56:28, Regional Approach Control’s Feeder East controller transmitted an all aircraft message which was received by flight 191. The message stated in part, “Attention, all aircraft listening… there’s a little rainshower just north of the airport and they’re starting to make ILS approaches … tune up one oh nine one for one seven left.” At 17:59, the first officer stated, “We’re gonna get our airplane washed,” and the captain switched to Regional Approach Control’s Arrival Radar-1 (AR-1) frequency and told the controller that they were at 5,000 feet. At 18:00, the approach controller asked American Air Lines flight 351 if it was able to see the airport. (Flight 351 was two airplanes ahead of flight 191 in the landing sequence for runway 17L.) Flight 351 replied, “As soon as we break out of this rainshower we will.” The controller then told flight 351 that it was 4 miles from the outer marker, and to join the localizer at 2,300 feet; the controller then cleared the flight for the ILS approach to runway 17L.
At 18:00, the approach controller asked flight 191 to reduce its airspeed to 170 knots, and to turn left to 270 degrees; flight 191 then acknowledged receipt of the clearance. Flight 191 had been sequenced behind a Learjet 25 for landing on runway 17L. At 18:02, the approach controller told flight 191 that it was 6 miles from the outer marker, requested that it turn to 180 degrees to join the localizer at or above 2,300 feet, and stated, “Cleared for ILS one seven left approach.” The flight acknowledged receipt of the transmission.
At 18:03:03, the approach controller requested flight 191 “to reduce your speed to one six zero please,” and the captain replied, “Be glad to.” Thereafter, at 18:03:30, he broadcast, “And we’re getting some variable winds out there due to a shower… out there north end of DFW.” This transmission was received by flight 191.
At 18:03:46, the approach controller requested flight 191 to slow to 150 KIAS, and to contact the DFW Airport tower. At 18:03:58, the captain, after switching to the tower’s radio frequency, stated, “Tower, Delta one ninety one heavy, out here in the rain, feels good.” The tower cleared the flight to land and informed it, “wind zero nine zero at five, gusts to one five.” At 18:04:07, the first officer called for the before-landing check. The flightcrew confirmed that the landing gear was down and that the flaps were extended to 33 degrees, the landing flap setting. At 18:04:18, the first officer said, “Lightning coming out of that one.” The captain asked, “What?” and the first officer repeated “Lightning coming out of that one.” The captain asked, and at 18:04:23, the first officer replied, “Right ahead of us.” Flight 191 continued descending along the final approach course. At 18:05:05 the captain called out “1,000 feet.” At 18:05:19, the captain cautioned the first officer to watch his indicated airspeed and a sound identified as rain began. The captain then warned the first officer, “You’re gonna lose it all of a sudden, there it is.” The captain stated, “Push it up, push it way up.” At 18:05:29, the sound of engines at high rpm was heard on the CVR, and the captain said “That’s it.” At 18:05:44, the Ground Proximity Warning System’s (GPWS) “Whoop whoop pull up” alert sounded and the captain commanded “TOGA”. The CVR recording ended at 18:05:58. Witnesses on or near State Highway 114 north of the airport saw flight 191 emerge from the rain about 1.25 miles from the end of runway 17L and then strike an automobile in the westbound lane of State Highway 114. Subsequent investigation showed that the airplane had touched down earlier and became airborne again before striking the automobile. After the plane struck the car and a light pole on the highway, other witnesses saw fire on the left side of the airplane in the vicinity of the wing root. The witnesses generally agreed that the airplane struck the ground in a left-wing-low attitude, and that the fuselage rotated counterclockwise after the left wing and cockpit area struck a water tank on the airport. A large explosion obscured the witnesses’ view momentarily, and then the tail section emerged from the fireball, skidding backwards. The tail section finally came to rest on its left side with the empennage pointing south and was subsequently blown to an upright position by wind gusts. One hundred and thirtyfour persons on board the airplane and the driver of the automobile which was struck by the airplane were killed in the accident; 27 persons on board the airplane and 1 rescue worker at the accident site were injured, 2 passengers on the airplane were uninjured

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The flight crew’s decision to initiate and continue the approach into a cumulonimbus cloud which they observed to contain visible lightning; the lack of specific guidelines, procedures and training for avoiding and escaping from low-level windshear; and the lack of definitive, real-time windshear hazard information. This resulted in the aircraft’s encounter at low altitude with a microburst-induced, severe windshear from a rapidly developing thunderstorm located on the final approach course.”

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Today is Thursday the 1st of August, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/01/2019 - 08:55

We start the month of August with these stories…

Be safe out there!

Tom

The post Today is Thursday the 1st of August, 2019 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

ILLINOIS MAN INJURED AFTER HELICOPTER CRASH NEAR FESSENDEN WEDNESDAY

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/01/2019 - 08:52

Posted By: Warren Abrahamson

FESSENDEN, N.D. (NewsDakota.com) – A man received minor injuries after his helicopter went down south of Fessenden Wednesday morning.

The North Dakota Highway Patrol and Wells County Sheriff’s Office responded to a helicopter crash about 4.5 miles south of Fessenden along Highway 52.

“The 2007 Robinson R44 helicopter was spraying waterways by Highway 52 and attempted to go under the powerlines on the east side of the roadway,” the patrol states. “The blades caught the bottom power line causing the helicopter to crash in a field about 200 yards from the roadway.”

The pilot, 49 year old Michael Hamouz of Willowbrook, IL, suffered minor injuries and was taken by ambulance as a precaution.

Photo: NDHP

https://www.newsdakota.com/2019/07/31/illinois-man-injured-after-crash-near-fessenden-wednesday/

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Navy fighter jet crash near Death Valley’s ‘Star Wars Canyon,’ seven visitors injured

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/01/2019 - 08:50

By COLLEEN SHALBY STAFF WRITER

A U.S. Navy F/A-18E Super Hornet jet crashed in Death Valley National Park near Father Crowley Vista Point Wednesday morning, leaving seven visitors with minor injuries. The status of the pilot remains unknown.

The crash occurred at approximately 10 a.m. near an area often referred to as Star Wars Canyon, not far from the Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake.

“We’re still trying to figure things out on our end,” said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Lydia Bock. “We have a search-and-rescue that has been dispatched out of China Lake and search-and-rescue out of Naval Station Lemoore with a medic on board.”

Search-and-rescue teams plan to continue their search for the pilot throughout the night.

“We’re looking for an aviator out there, hoping for the best,” an official said.

While it is not common for military jets to fly low over national parks, it is a standard practice in Death Valley.

“It’s one of the main attractions,” said Death Valley National Park public information officer Patrick Taylor.

The Air Force and Navy have used the area for military training practices since the early 1930s.

Most of the aircraft that pass through come from Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, Naval Air Station Lemoore, Edwards Air Force Base, Fresno Air National Guard Base and Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada. International jets are also known to make flybys.

It’s unclear whether those who reported injuries were in the area to observe the jets. Taylor said the area also provides a parking lot and a restroom.

“There’s a lot of people that stop there totally unassociated with the jets,” he said.

Times staff writer Ruben Vives contributed to this report.

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-07-31/u-s-navy-f-a-185e-jet-crashes-near-china-lake

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Sukhoi Superjet 100 makes emergency landing in Samara

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/01/2019 - 08:49

The plane is carrying 97 passengers

MOSCOW, July 31. /TASS/. The Sukhoi Superjet 100 passenger plane en route from Krasnodar to Tyumen, carrying 97 passengers, made an emergency landing at an airport in Russia’s Volga city of Samara, a local transport prosecutor’s spokesperson Maya Ivanova told TASS on Wednesday.

An alert was issued at 3.01 a.m. local time (2.01 a.m. Moscow Time) that the plane would make an emergency landing after experiencing an engine malfunction (vibration). The aircraft of Azimuth airline safely landed at Kurumoch Airport at 3.17 a.m. local time (2.17 a.m. Moscow Time), she said.

The airline has sent another plane from Rostov-on-Don to perform the flight to Tyumen. The plane took off at 7.30 a.m. and the flight delay would be nearly three and a half hours. The flight back to Krasnodar is scheduled for 9 a.m.

https://tass.com/emergencies/1071130

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NTSB Releases Preliminary Report From Fatal Quicksilver Accident

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/01/2019 - 08:47

Airplane Went Down Last Month In Louisiana

The NTSB has released a preliminary report from an accident which occurred June 12 near Henderson, Louisiana that resulted in the fatal injury of the two people on board the unregistered Quicksilver airplane. 

According to the report, the plane went down at about 1050 central daylight time. The aircraft was identified as a QuickSilver Sport 2S light sport airplane which impacted terrain. The airplane was owned by a private individual and had an expired FAA registration. Day VFR conditions prevailed for the personal local area flight that departed a private airstrip near Cecilia, Louisiana, at 1032.

According to data downloaded from a handheld GPS device recovered at the accident site, at 1032:33, the airplane departed a private airstrip located about 1 mile southwest of Cecilia, Louisiana. After the takeoff to the southeast, the airplane entered a climbing left turn to east-northeast and flew over downtown Cecilia, Louisiana, about 400 ft mean sea level (msl). The airplane then continued northeast until 1036:35 when it entered a left turn to west while maintaining a cruise altitude and ground speed of about 450 ft msl and 55 mph, respectively. The airplane then landed at Juneau Landing Strip, a private airstrip located 2.5 miles southeast of Arnaudville, Louisiana. After the touch-and-go landing toward the northwest, the airplane entered a climbing right turn toward east. The airplane climbed to maximum altitude of 888 ft msl while maintaining an east course and an average ground speed of about 55 mph. At 1048:31, the airplane entered a left turn toward north and began a shallow descent. The final GPS data point was recorded at 1049:34 about 0.48 miles south of the accident site. At that point the airplane was still flying north and had descended to and decelerated to 778 ft msl and 42 mph ground speed, respectively.

There were no eyewitnesses to the final flight path to the accident site.

According to FAA records, the 49-year-old pilot held a sport pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot did not pilot possess a FAA aviation medical certificate; however, regulations only required the pilot to have a valid driver’s license to operate the light sport airplane. According to local law enforcement, the pilot had a valid Louisiana driver’s license. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. A pilot logbook was not located during the investigation.

According to FAA records, the 38-year-old passenger held an expired student pilot certificate. The student pilot certificate had expired on October 31, 2012. The passenger did not pilot possess a FAA aviation medical certificate. According to local law enforcement, the passenger had a valid Louisiana driver’s license. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. A pilot logbook was not located during the investigation.

The two-seat light sport airplane, serial number 0145, manufactured in 2004, was a high-wing monoplane constructed of aluminum tubes covered with fabric. The airplane was powered by a 65-horsepower, two-cylinder, two-stroke, Rotax 582 reciprocating engine, serial number 6025379. The engine provided thrust through a fixed-pitch, three-blade, carbon-composite, Warp Drive propeller. The airplane was equipped with fixed-tricycle landing gear and had a maximum gross weight of 1,000 pounds. The airplane was equipped with a 10-gallon main fuel tank and a 6-gallon auxiliary fuel tank. The fuel in the auxiliary tank was transferred to the main tank via an electric pump. The airplane used automobile gas premixed with two-cycle engine oil. The FAA issued the light sport airplane a special airworthiness certificate and registration in November 2007. The FAA registration expired on January 31, 2015, and the airplane’s registration number (N7551V) was subsequently removed from the FAA registry database on January 9, 2018. The airplane owner did not possess any airplane maintenance documentation, nor did the airplane have a current condition inspection. The current owner purchased the airplane on May 27, 2014. The airplane owner provided a list of flights with associated hour meter readings. The airplane use log indicated that the airplane had 342 hours since new when the current owner purchased the airplane. Based on the airplane use log, a new zero-time hour meter was installed at an unknown date after the owner had purchased the airplane. The airplane’s hour meter indicated 100.0 hours at the accident site. Based on available documentation, the airplane had accumulated 442 hours since new at the time of the accident.

According to the airplane manufacturer’s specifications, the maximum level speed at sea level was 68 mph, the expected cruise speed at 75% engine power was 59 mph, the expected cruise speed at 65% engine power was 55 mph, the landing approach speed was 49 mph, and the power-off aerodynamic stall speed was 38 mph.

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at Lafayette Regional Airport (LFT) about 17 miles southwest of the accident site. At 1053, about 3 minutes after the accident, the LFT automated surface observing system reported a calm wind, 10 miles surface visibility, a clear sky, temperature 25°C, dew point 17°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury.

The accident site was on a level dirt road located alongside a levee. The ground elevation at the accident site was 17 ft msl. The initial point-of-impact was with the top of a tree line located about 50 ft from the accident site. The top of the tree line about 65 ft above ground level. The damage to the airplane was consistent with it impacting the ground in a nose-down pitch attitude on a north heading. The airplane subsequently came to rest inverted on a 320° magnetic heading. The main wreckage consisted of the entire airplane. There was tree debris conjoined with the inboard right-wing leading edge, right wing strut, and the cockpit. All major structural components and flight controls were identified at the accident site. Flight control continuity to the ailerons and rudder was confirmed at the accident site. Elevator control tube continuity was confirmed through an overstress separation located at aft pivot point. The observed damage to the elevator push/pull tube assembly was consistent with impact related damage. The main fuel tank did not contain any fuel, and the auxiliary fuel tank contained about 1 gallon of fuel.

First responders reported that there was fuel leaking from the fuel tanks with the airplane inverted, and that they placed the fuel shutoff to the OFF position. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was in the OFF position. Both electronic ignition switches were in the ON position. The airplane was equipped with a ballistic recovery parachute. The parachute activation handle was in the stowed position with the safety pin installed. The ballistic rocket and parachute had deployed upon impact. The engine had separated from its engine mounts. The engine did not exhibit any crankcase or cylinder fractures, nor was there any evidence of oil leaks on the exterior engine components. The sparkplugs exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. Both carburetors had separated from their respective induction tubes. Both carburetor bowls contained residual fuel. No contamination was observed in the carburetor bowls or their fuel screens. Both induction tubes contained sandy soil deposits, consistent with dirt ingestion upon impact. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on both cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The rotary induction valve was undamaged. The ignition system provided spark at all four spark plugs when the electric starter motor was used to rotate the crankshaft. The cylinder wall, piston dome, and piston skirt exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. The propeller reduction gear box was disassembled, and no anomalies were observed with the gearing or clutch assembly. The propeller hub remained attached to the reduction gearbox. The carbon-composite propeller exhibited blade damage consistent with rotation at impact. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

(Source: NTSB. Image from file. Not accident airplane)

FMI: Report

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“Disregarding Orders” Among Issues Resulting In Burned Firefighter (The Secret List)

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/01/2019 - 08:46

All,

As you will recall, Captain Dave Smiley Jr., a 23-year-old volunteer rescue Captain for  Delaware’s Minquas Fire Company (New Castle County, near Wilmington), sustained serious burns in March at a working house fire in Mill Creek. Captain Smiley is also a career Firefighter with the Lebanon City Fire Department in Pennsylvania.

This information and the forthcoming report is another opportunity for each of us to focus on our own departments, looking to see if these conditions/situations/problems are “lying in wait” and exist now-or could occur on your/mine/our firegrounds.

Strict Command, Control, Accountability, Communication, Training & Disciplined Fireground Behavior Once Again Causes Injury To The Members of Our Profession.  

NOTE: This report nearly mirrors the NIOSH TOP 5, identifying our Firefighters are killed in the Line of Duty when operating on the fireground. 

1-Risk Assessment.
2-Incident Command.
3-Fireground Accountability.
4-Fireground Communication.
5-Lack of Policy or failure to follow established policy.

A spokesman for the Mill Creek Fire Company, which requested the report be done, said the company was taking immediate internal action on the findings but did not elaborate. 

In the report issued by the Delaware State Fire School about the fire, several problems were identified:

—APPARATUS OPERATORS/QUALIFICATIONS:

Fundamental errors were made by the operators of the two main apparatus responsible for providing water. A Mill Creek Firefighter stated in his interview that he was unfamiliar with the apparatus he was operating. Several Firefighters interviewed about this fire relayed past experiences when the operator of a Hockessin firefighter had difficulties.

—WATER SUPPLY CONFUSION:

The nearest fire hydrant, which was about 800 feet from the fire, was not identified, not listed on internal maps – and may still not be listed.

Water failing to flow from the lead engine because they were improperly connected. The mistakes delayed the fire attack for 16 minutes, according to three high-ranking fire officials who spoke to the media on the condition they not be named.

There were also questions about how much water the Mill Creek tanker was carrying when it arrived at the fire scene. The report was unable to determine if the tanker was carrying its full capacity of water, but listed reasons why firefighters could have run out of water coming from that tanker:

the tank was not completely full;

water was not utilized efficiently;

or the driver shut the line down prematurely, relying on the tank level lights to determine when the engine was empty.

—DISREGARDING ORDERS ON THE FIREGROUND:

Many firefighters chose to remain inside the structure long after it was broadcast over the operational channel that they were to evacuate, on orders of command. Some firefighters even disregarded face-to-face verbal orders to evacuate.

—FIRE SCENE CONFUSION:

Confusion in designating the sides of a structure. In the Mill Creek fire, the incident commander declared the side of the structure facing Mill Creek Road as Alpha side, but other firefighters assumed another side of the burning house was Alpha. This created confusion when firefighters provided updates on sides they thought they were working.

—PPE:

-The injured Captain didn’t have proper firefighting gloves

-The Captain wasn’t wearing or using the waist straps on his SCBA. None of the Firefighters from Minquas that could be observed in video were wearing the waist strap on their SCBA which appears to have directly led to the difficulty firefighters had in rescuing their Captain. When they attempted to lift him from the hole, they were simply pulling the SCBA from his back.- stated the report.

-The Captains helmet was 30 years old and did not have a chin strap, an impact shell and the inner lining and ear flaps were apparently made of combustible material “because they burned completely away,” the report found.

-Different PPE. One firefighter riding Elsmere’s fire truck was wearing his gear from Christiana, while a part-time firefighter on Hockessin’s ambulance wore his volunteer gear from Delaware City. This could have caused confusion if they identified themselves on the radio as something other than the gear they were wearing. There have been documented LODD’s where identification on the fireground contributed to losses.

Much more is expected to come out from this report but once again, focus on using this as a “template” to see if any of this could happen on any fireground that your agency operates on. That’s the value of this information. We wish Captain Smiley a continued successful recovery from his injuries.

Here is the entire media report: https://tinyurl.com/ yysf2m4h

Take Care. Be Careful. Pass it On.

BillyG

The Secret List 7/31/.2019-2130 Hours

www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/01/2019 - 08:44

29 Years ago today: On 1 August 1990 an Aeroflot Yakovlev 40 crashed near Stepanakert, killing all 47 occupants.

Date: Wednesday 1 August 1990 Time: 11:10 Type: Yakovlev Yak-40 Operator: Aeroflot / Armenia Registration: CCCP-87453 C/n / msn: 9431036 First flight: 1974 Engines:Ivchenko AI-25 Crew: Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 3 Passengers: Fatalities: 43 / Occupants: 43 Total: Fatalities: 46 / Occupants: 46 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 22 km (13.8 mls) W of Stepanakert (   Azerbaijan) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Yerevan-Zvartnots Airport (EVN/UDYZ), Armenia Destination airport: Stepanakert Airport, Azerbaijan

Narrative:
The Yakovlev 40 struck a cloud covered hill at an altitude of 2520 m.
PROBABLE CAUSE: Premature descent.

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Today is Wednesday the 31st of July, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 08:42

We end the month of July with the following stories…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Pilot out of hospital after small plane crashes at Hanna airport

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 08:40

By Adam Toy 770 CHQR 

One man was treated in hospital and later released after the aircraft he was piloting crashed at the Hanna Airport northeast of Calgary.

Just before 1:30 a.m. on July 30, Hanna RCMP, EMS and the local fire department responded to a report of a small plane crash at the airport, RCMP said in a release. The male pilot — also the lone occupant — was transported to hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

RCMP, working with the Transportation Safety Board of Canada and the Department of National Defence, investigated the crash and determined the cause to be non-criminal, the RCMP said Tuesday.

The plane stopped approximately 50 metres from the runway and was scheduled to be removed on Tuesday.

https://cisnfm.com/news/5704131/plane-crash-hanna-airport/

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