ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Possible Fuel Spill At Space Coast Regional Airport After Two Aircraft Flip Over Due To High Wind

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 07:37

By Space Coast Daily

BREVARD COUNTY • TITUSVILLE, FLORIDA – Titusville Fire Department has responded to a call Monday afternoon about two aircraft that have flipped over, due to high winds, at Space Coast Regional Airport.

Officials with the fire department are looking into a possible fuel spill from aircrafts.

Rescue crews received the call around 4 p.m.

Brevard County Fire Rescue, along with Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting (ARFF) is also on the scene.

Titusville Fire Department is also checking on a possible third aircraft that overturned. ARFF unit on scene. Assisting in checking for hazards/spills.

http://spacecoastdaily.com/2018/06/possible-fuel-spill-at-space-coast-regional-airport-after-two-aircraft-flip-over-due-to-high-wind/

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American Airlines plane forced to make emergency landing in El Paso because of hail damage

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 07:35

María Cortés González, El Paso Times

An American Airlines airplane headed to Phoenix had to make an emergency landing Sunday evening at the El Paso International Airport due to hail damage to its nose and windshield. 

“American Airlines flight 1897, from San Antonio to Phoenix, diverted to El Paso due to damage sustained by weather in flight. We commend the great work of our pilots, along with our flight attendants, who safely landed the Airbus A319 at 8:03 p.m.,” an American Airlines spokesperson said in an email.

The spokesperson added: “The aircraft is currently being evaluated by our maintenance team. We never want to disrupt our customers’ travel plans, and we are sorry for the trouble this caused.”

No injuries were reported and all passengers deplaned normally. The plane had been in the air for about two hours.

The flight had 130 passengers and a crew of five.

American Airlines officials said passengers were able to resume their trip to Phoenix on a different aircraft. That plane took off from El Paso at 11:46 p.m.

Several Twitter users shared photos of the plane’s nose and windshield that showed significant damage.

https://www.elpasotimes.com/story/news/local/el-paso/2018/06/04/american-airlines-emergency-landing-el-paso-hail-damage/670959002/

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 07:34

68 Years ago today: On 5 June 1950 a Westair Transport Curtiss C-46F-1-CU crashed off Miami, killing 28 out of 65 occupants.

Date: Monday 5 June 1950 Time: 22:03 Type: Curtiss C-46F-1-CU Commando Operator: Westair Transport Registration: N1248N C/n / msn: 22496 First flight: 1945 Total airframe hrs: 2890 Engines:Pratt & Whitney R-2800-75 Crew: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 3 Passengers: Fatalities: 28 / Occupants: 62 Total: Fatalities: 28 / Occupants: 65 Airplane damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 480 km (300 mls) E off Melbourne, FL, USA (   Atlantic Ocean) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: Domestic Non Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: San Juan-Isla Grande Airport (SIG/TJIG), Puerto Rico Destination airport: Wilmington-New Hanover County Airport, NC (ILM/KILM), United States of America

Narrative:
The fully laden Curtiss C-46, which was 258 pounds in excess of the mtow, departed from San Juan, Puerto Rico, at 17:24 for Wilmington. Approx. 21:45 the crew noticed that the indicated right engine oil quantity had fallen from 32 gallons to 20. Immediately after this was observed, the left engine backfired and lost power. Application of carburetor heat and adjustment of fuel mixture and other engine controls were ineffectual, so the left propeller was feathered. The aircraft was headed toward Nassau, the closest island with an adequate landing field. Power settings for the right engine were increased to 2400 rpm and 30 in manifold pressure. The cruising altitude of 6,500 feet was maintained for about five minutes. Shortly afterwards the crew observed that the indicated oil quantity for the right engine had fallen from 20 to 15 gallons. At about the same time the crew also observed that the right engine was overheating with an indicated cylinder head temperature of nearly 300 degrees centigrade. Because of this condition, the captain began a voluntary descent to ditch before complete right engine failure occurred. An attempt was made to hold altitude at 200 feet above the water until shore stations could obtain radio bearings. The right engine speed decreased from 2400 to 2250 rpm and could not he increased. Airspeed was then reduced to between 100 and 110 mph by retarding the right throttle, and the aircraft was ditched about 20 minutes after the malfunctioning of the left engine began. The wing flaps and landing lights were not used. At the time, the weather was clear and the wind was from the southwest at approximately 10 miles per hour.
As soon as the aircraft came to rest in the water, the crew entered the cabin where they opened the main cabin door and the emergency exits. The emergency exits were not opened prior to the ditching as prescribed in the company’s Operation Manual. Some of the passengers then climbed out onto the wings, and others jumped into the sea. All seven of the 10-man life rafts were thrown overboard, five floated away in the darkness because their retaining ropes were not held, two were inflated The three crew members and 34 of the 62 passengers were able to swim to and board the two life rafts. During the night five flares were fired at intervals but were not observed. A company C-46, which had remained in the search area, reported at 23:21, one hour and eighteen minutes after the ditching, that they saw a blinking light on the water. A fix was established and the following morning a Coast Guard aircraft located the survivors, and shortly afterwards the USS Saufley, a US Navy destroyer, drew alongside and rescued those in the two life rafts. The position of the rescue was 27 degrees 51’north latitude and 75 degrees 22’west longitude.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The malfunctioning of both engines from causes unknown.”

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Today is Monday the 4th of June, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:27

We start the new week with the following stories…

Have a good week, be safe out there!

Tom

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Pilot, passenger safe after Longview plane crash

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:26

By Jimmy Daniell Isaac

Two men walked away from a plane crash Friday morning after the aircraft went down near a northeast Longview neighborhood.

Longview police and fire crews responded to the scene of the crash shortly after 7:30 a.m. in the Mission Creek subdivision south of Page Road between Alpine Road and East Loop 281.

“We are on the scene of a small plane crash,” Fire Chief J.P. Steelman said shortly after crews responded to the crash.

He said both occupants of the plane exited on their own. Texas Department of Public Safety crews also responded and were investigating.

DPS spokeswoman Jean Dark said the pilot was Randall Coggin, 74, of Longview. She said he told officials he had made repairs to the aircraft and was testing it when he experienced engine failure and made a hard landing.

The aircraft took off from a private runway at Eastside Airport about 2 miles from the crash site, Dark said.

According to Dark, Coggin and his passenger, Coby Melvin, 67, of Longview, were treated at the scene.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane is a Silvaire Luscombe 8A fixed-wing single-engine that is registered to John D. Stewart of Longview.

Officials from the National Transportation Safety Board and FAA were headed to the scene for further investigation, Dark said.

At 9:09 a.m. Friday, Steelman said Longview police and fire personnel had left scene, while Texas Department of Public Safety officers from Harrison County remained at the crash site.

The crash is the second such incident in the city potentially involving Eastside Airport in about as many years.

On March 18, 2016, a plane that had taken off from the airport crashed in a wooded area north of East Marshall Avenue, injuring the pilot.

https://www.news-journal.com/news/local/small-plane-crashes-in-longview-neighborhood-no-injuries/article_f0a485b2-659c-11e8-87fc-3b696a832244.html

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US military air-to-air refuelling jet makes emergency landing at Shannon

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:24

By Patrick Flynn

A US military aerial refuelling aircraft has made an emergency landing at Shannon Airport this afternoon.

The US Air Force McDonnell Douglas KC-10 is believed to suffered a problem with one of its engines over the Atlantic.

The crew declared an emergency reporting they had shut down one of the jet’s three engines. There were nine crew members on board.

Five units of the fire brigade from Shannon Town were sent to the scene in support of the airport’s own Fire and Rescue Service.

Two units of Ennis Fire Service were mobilised to the incident while National Ambulance Service and Gardaí also sent resources to the airport.

The flight landed safely at 3pm and was met by airport and local authority fire crews who accompanied the jet to a remote parking stand.

An inspection of the aircraft afterwards discovered that a panel was missing from the jet’s left engine.

Engineers were also standing by to inspect the engine and determine whether any damage had been caused to the plane.

The aircraft is attached to the 305th Maintenance Squadron based at McGuire Air Force base in New Jersey in the US.

https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/ireland/us-military-air-to-air-refuelling-jet-makes-emergency-landing-at-shannon-846716.html

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Pilot makes emergency landing in Northeast Philadelphia

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:23

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) —

The pilot of a small plane walked away unharmed after a making an emergency landing at the Northeast Philadelphia Airport.

It happened Saturday morning.

The pilot radioed the control tower that the landing gear on his Piper Saratoga had failed and that he would be bringing the plane down belly-first.

The landing was successful. No one was injured.

The airport was shut down for several hours as crews worked to remove the damaged aircraft from the runway.

It was back open by 2 p.m.

http://6abc.com/pilot-makes-emergency-landing-in-ne-philly/3552963/

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Plane crashes in Lake Gladewater

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:21

By Jessica Faith

GLADEWATER, TX (KLTV) –

A plane was found in Lake Gladewater this morning.

Officials responded Saturday morning to get the ultra-light plane out of the water.

Gladewater Fire Department, Gladewater Police Department, Upshur County Sheriff’s Office, Texas State Troopers, and Champion EMS were all on the scene.

The Gladewater Fire Department stated that the pilot is okay and only has minor injuries.

The plane is registered to a Gladewater man. It is classified as “experimental” and “amateur-built.”

The plane is now out of the water.

The Texas Department of Public Safety and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the incident.

http://www.kltv.com/story/38332571/plane-crashes-in-lake-gladewater

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Officials: Search suspended for 2 on plane that crashed off Amagansett

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:20

The aircraft, a twin-engine Piper PA-31 Navajo, crashed about 2 miles off Indian Wells Beach on Saturday, the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement.

By Lisa Irizarry and Vera Chinese

Rescue workers on Sunday did not find the two people still missing from the crash of a twin-engine plane Saturday in the waters off Amagansett and suspended the search because of “deteriorating sea conditions,” East Hampton Town police said.

Several law enforcement agencies had been searching nonstop for the two people aboard the Piper PA-31 Navajo since shortly after it crashed about 3:20 p.m. Saturday.

As dive teams, Coast Guard cutters and several other first responders searched into Sunday afternoon, winds picked up and waves were cresting at between 4 and 8 feet, adding to the already challenging conditions, officials said.

The four people aboard when the plane crashed were identified early Sunday as East End builder Bernard Krupinski, 70; his wife, Bonnie Krupinski, 70; William Maerov, 22 — all of East Hampton — and the pilot, Jon Dollard, 47, of Hampton Bays, according to a news release from the police department. Maerov is the Krupinskis’ grandson.

“The Krupinski, Bistrian, Maerov and Dollard families are grateful for the sincere outpouring of support from so many who knew and loved them,” family representatives said in a statement posted on Instagram Sunday evening. “We extend our deep appreciation to the U.S. Coast Guard and other emergency responders on land, sea and air including the East Hampton Town Police Department, NY and scores of others.

“A memorial service will be announced in coming weeks. In honor of Ben & Bonnie, with whom we have been fortunate to work as members of their extended family, we continue their commitment to delivering excellence in service to all of you in the community.”

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash, said spokesman Terry Williams, but agency representatives are not on the scene. Williams said he had no information to release but expected more details on Monday.

Two bodies were recovered from the Atlantic Ocean Saturday, but their identities had not been confirmed as of Sunday afternoon, said James Curto, a spokesman for the Coast Guard’s Long Island sector. The identities of those still missing were not available.

About 11 a.m. Sunday, relatives of those aboard the twin-engine plane met with East Hampton Town police to get updates about the search.

The focus of the search appeared to have moved west from restive ocean waters about 2 miles off Indian Wells Beach to an area off Wainscott Beach as officials moved their command center to an area off Beach Lane in Wainscott. The water depth in both areas is between 30 and nearly 100 feet, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

The Long Island weather forecast calls for winds of at least 15 mph and periods of rain and thunderstorms on Monday.

“The wind can affect the ability to detect objects in the water. It causes it to be more choppy,” Curto said.

It was not clear when or if a renewed search involving Coast Guard cutters, helicopters and the resources of several other agencies would take place. Coast Guard Petty Officer Donald Newton said a dive team from the East Hampton Town Police Department would be back in the water Tuesday morning.

The plane crashed about 2 miles off shore near Indian Wells Beach, the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement Saturday.

The agency had lost contact with the plane at 2:33 p.m., and the Coast Guard received a report of a debris field about an hour later, said U.S. Coast Guard spokeswoman Lt. Alaina Fagan Saturday.

East Hampton Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc said that according to preliminary information he received, the plane went down during a thunderstorm Saturday. “The initial report I received was that they were going through a squall,” Fagan said.

After the crash, a command post was set up outside the entrance to the beach on Indian Wells Highway to coordinate the search, which included teams from the East Hampton Town police, the Coast Guard, Suffolk police and private boats.

A Coast Guard helicopter based at Cape Cod and Suffolk’s aviation unit had also searched around the debris field.

Beach Lane, which was closed to the public Sunday with only emergency crews and residents allowed in, was reopened after the search was suspended.

The Krupinskis owned restaurants and real estate together and were well-known in the East End social and political scene. Bernard Krupinski, also known as Ben, was a builder to the celebrity set who counted Billy Joel and Martha Stewart among his clients. Bonnie Krupinski was a developer and businesswoman.

Joel and Stewart released statements Sunday about the Krupinskis.

“I’m shocked and saddened to hear of the death of Ben and Bonnie Krupinski,” Joel said. “Ben undertook to get my East Hampton house project completed in the 1980s when the construction progress had been stalled due to bad management.”

Stewart said she was “devastated by the news of the untimely passing of my dear friends, Ben and Bonnie Krupinski,”

She described Maerov as “an outstanding young man — very curious, well educated, well-traveled and a delight to be with.”

In his spare time, Bernard Krupinski was an avid pilot, with multiple planes registered, according to the FAA.

Alejandro Silva of East Hampton, Stewart’s local gardener for 25 years, said he delivered the bad news to her at her Westchester County home.

“It was very sad,” he said, adding the Krupinskis were “very friendly to everybody here.”

Silva said he went to Indian Wells Beach on Sunday morning to pay his respects.

“This town lost a very great person,” Silva said of Ben Krupinski.

Dollard was a waiter at Oakland’s Restaurant and Marina in the early 1990s before he became a pilot, restaurant co-owner Christine Oakland Hill said Sunday morning. Long after Dollard had moved on, he had remained a regular customer at the restaurant.

Dollard was “just amazing,” Oakland Hill said. “Always upbeat. Just awesome.”

She said the restaurant staff is in mourning.

“He’s been with us since the very beginning,” Oakland Hill said. “This is so shocking.”

The crash was the second involving a small plane on Long Island in less than a week.

On Wednesday, a World War II-era military trainer went down in a wooded area of Melville, killing its sole occupant, Ken Johansen, a member of the GEICO Skytypers stunt team that had performed at the Bethpage Air Show at Jones Beach.

With David M. Schwartz

https://www.newsday.com/long-island/suffolk/small-plane-crash-amagansett-1.18924741?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

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Small plane makes emergency landing in Huntington Beach neighborhood; no one injured

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:18

By MIKE CRUZ  and DAN ALBANO

The female pilot of a small airplane doing practice work in the air around John Wayne Airport made an emergency landing Friday afternoon on a street in a Huntington Beach neighborhood.

A small Cessna made a surprise landing on a street in Huntington Beach on Friday, just half-a-mile from PCH.
No injuries were visible at the scene just shy of the intersection of Hamilton and Newland. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

Neither the pilot, who was the sole occupant of the Cessna 172, nor anyone on the ground was injured, according to Huntington Beach police officer Angela Bennett. The plane did not hit anything on the ground, she said.

Bill Castelblanco was at work at Castel Innovations on Hamilton Avenue when suddenly there was screaming outside.

“We heard everybody screaming at the same time, so we ran out right when everybody else did,” Castelblanco said. He missed the plane touch down, but it was traveling up the street.

“Obviously, they were screaming because there was a plane landing in the middle of the street,” said Castelblanco, a pilot himself. “We don’t know what caused it. People are saying that she had engine failure, but the engine was running when she landed.”

The plane lost power shortly after takeoff from John Wayne Airport, Huntington Beach Police Chief Robert Handy tweeted.

Police and fire personnel got a call at 4:55 p.m. that a plane went down near Hamilton Avenue and Newland Street, about a half-mile from Pacific Coast Highway, and officers responded within minutes. The pilot told police the plane had some sort of engine trouble or failure and had already notified the Federal Aviation Administration of the landing.

The pilot was doing practice work in the air traffic pattern around John Wayne Airport when she reported a loss of engine power, said Ian Gregor, an FAA spokesman. The agency is investigating the incident, he said.

Video of the landing showed a vehicle avoiding the fast moving plane as it headed down Hamilton.

Castelblanco said the pilot appeared calm and did a really good job avoiding all of the power lines, cars and people.

Police officers asked the pilot to shut off the engine. Castelblanco said it appeared that she might try to move the plane, but police told her to leave the plane where it was.

“It was pretty exciting,” Castelblanco said. “You don’t see this every day.”

The plane is registered in Los Angeles to JG Capital Holdings LLC, an equity research firm.

Hamilton is closed between Newland Street and Seaforth Lane for the investigation. Police were unsure how long the closure would remain in effect.

https://www.ocregister.com/2018/06/01/small-plane-makes-emergency-landing-in-huntington-beach-neighborhood-no-one-injured/

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Planes, Arkansas airport destroyed due to storm

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:15

By: Tony Atkins

An Arkansas community is in the process of recovery after storms ripped through their town.  

Colt, Arkansas is just outside of Forrest City, Arkansas, where thousands still remain without power. FOX13’s Tony Atkins went to the small town of Colt Sunday and spent his day there. We observed the entire airport was destroyed including the actual airplanes.

Chuck Currie, who is a plane owner, told FOX13 he can’t believe it’s all gone.

“I hate it. It’s just gone,” Currie said.

Currie told FOX13 he only had his plane for less than a year. He was devastated to see it’s condition.

“I always wanted one of these. This was the only thing on my bucket list,” Currie said.

Shannon Hobbs of the Delta Regional Airport Authority said the airport was about 18-years in the making. He says between all planes, and the hangar damages could be in the millions. 

“It’s very disheartening. You have to try to find the bright side, that there’s no injuries, and nobody’s hurt,” Hobbs told FOX13.

Hobbs said he’s not going to take long to rebuild the airport. He’s determined to make things right again.

Wow.

Every plane at Delta Regional Airport totaled after 100 MPH winds rip through Colt, AR. The airport was a project to bridge Forrest City and Wynne communities. pic.twitter.com/tUxHOhX8S3

— Tony Atkins (@TonyAtkinsFOX13) June 3, 2018

“We’ll rebound. We’ll make it happen. We’ll work together and see the project come back bigger and better than ever,” Hobbs said.

https://www.fox13memphis.com/top-stories/planes-arkansas-airport-destroyed-due-to-storm/762230251

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:12

51 Years ago today: On 4 June 1967 a British Midland Canadair C-4 Argonaut crashed into houses on approach to Manchester killing 72 out of 84 occupants.

Date: Sunday 4 June 1967 Time: 09:09 UTC Type: Canadair C-4 Argonaut Operator: British Midland Airways – BMA Registration: G-ALHG C/n / msn: 153 First flight: 1949 Engines:Rolls-Royce Merlin 622 Crew: Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 5 Passengers: Fatalities: 69 / Occupants: 79 Total: Fatalities: 72 / Occupants: 84 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Stockport (   United Kingdom) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Int’l Non Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Palma de Mallorca Airport (PMI/LEPA), Spain Destination airport: Manchester International Airport (MAN/EGCC), United Kingdom

Narrative:
The C-4 Argonaut aircraft operated a charter flight from Manchester, United Kingdom to Palma de Mallorca, Spain and return. It landed at Palma at 02:20 hours UTC, was refuelled and took off for Manchester at 04:06 hours UTC. The co-pilot was flying the aircraft from the right-hand seat and the flight was uneventful.

Approach
Between 08:56 and 09:00 the aircraft was descending for approach and landing and was being vectored towards the ILS localizer of runway 24. At 09:01:30 the flight was informed that it was 9 miles from touchdown and well left of the centre line and it was asked if it was receiving the ILS. The pilot-in-command replied that he was and would turn right a little. Shortly thereafter one engine, most probably No.4, stopped delivering power, followed some 15 seconds later by the other engine on the same wing. The pilot-in-command took over the controls and just after 09:03 the controller told the flight that it was 6 miles from touchdown and asked if it was established on the ILS localizer. This message was not acknowledged by the flight and 7 seconds later the controller asked if it was still receiving. The pilot-in-command then replied “Hotel Golf is overshooting, we’ve got a little bit of trouble with rpm”.
Go around
The aircraft’s air speed was then only 116 kt and its height 1838 ft AMSL. The controller then ordered the pilot-in-command to turn left on to 160°M and climb to 2500 ft QNH. He then asked the reason for overshooting and was told “We’ve a little bit of trouble with rpm, will advise you”. At 09:03:51 the captain asked what the left turn was on to. The controller noted that the aircraft had already turned through 25° to the right instead of to the left, so he ordered the pilot to continue turning right on to 020 degrees and climb to 2500 ft on QNH. This was acknowledged by the co-pilot. At 09:04:41 the controller asked the flight to advise when ready to recommence the approach. By this time the aircraft’s IAS had dropped to 111 kt, its height to 1287 ft QNH, and it had broken cloud. Thereafter it flew below cloud in conditions of reasonable visibility. At 09:05:26 the controller told the flight that it was 7 miles from the airfield on a bearing of 040 degrees and requested its height. The flight reported at 1000 ft. This was the first indication to the controller that the aircraft was faced with an emergency and after checking that the height given was correct he put full emergency procedure into operation at the airfield and ordered the aircraft to turn right on to 180 M, so that it would close the ILS localizer.
Loss of altitude
At 09:05:47 the controller asked the flight if it could maintain height. The pilot-in-command now at 981 ft AMSL and only some 800 ft above the ground replied “just about”. He was told he was 8 miles from touchdown and should continue his right turn on to 200 degrees M and maintain as much height as possible. At this point 341 ft of height were lost in 10 seconds after the TAS had fallen to 100 kt and the pilot-in-command said he was not able to maintain height at the moment. The controller told him that he was 8 miles from touchdown and closing the ILS localizer from the right. At 09:07:09, the controller informed the flight that radar contact had been lost due to the aircraft’s low height and asked the pilot to adjust his heading on the ILS and report when established. The co-pilot replied that they had “the lights to our right” and were at 800 ft, just maintaining height, and the pilot-in-command asked for the emergency to be laid on. At 09:07:35 the pilot-in-command requested his position and was told 7,5 miles to run to touchdown. Half a minute later the controller repeated that he had no radar contact, and cleared the flight for landing, the surface wind being 270°/12 kt. At this stage the PAR controller, who had overheard that the Approach controller had lost radar contact, saw a contact at the bottom of his elevation display, and told the flight that it was 6 miles from touchdown. The co-pilot then gave their altitude as being 500 ft. The terrain clearance was only 300 ft and the IAS was below 105 kt and falling. The aircraft was approximately on the line of the ILS localizer and heading for the very centre of the built up area of Stockport. A few seconds after 09:09 hours the aircraft struck the ground more or less level in pitch, slightly right wing down, and slightly yawed to the right. The left wing struck a 3-storey building and was ripped off, causing the aircraft to crash in a small relatively open space near tall blocks of flats and other buildings.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The immediate cause of the accident was loss of power of both engines on the starboard side resulting in control problems which prevented the pilot from maintaining height on the available power with one propeller windmilling. The loss of power of the first engine was due to fuel starvation due to inadvertent fuel transfer in flight. The loss of power of the second engine was due either to fuel starvation resulting from inadvertent fuel transfer in flight or to misidentification by the crew of which engine had failed followed by failure to restore power in time to the engine misidentified as having failed.
Contributory causes of the accident were:
(a) The design of the fuel valves and location in the cockpit of their actuating levers, so that a failure by the pilot correctly to position the lever by an amount so small as to be easy to do and difficult to recognize would result in inadvertent fuel transfer on a scale sufficient to involve the risk after a long flight of a tank expected to contain sufficient fuel being in fact empty.
(b) Failure of those responsible for the design of the fuel system or the fuel valves to warn users that failure by a small amount to place the actuating levers in the proper position would result in inadvertent fuel transfer on a scale involving this risk after a long flight.
(c) Failure of British Midland’s air crew or engineers to recognize the possibility of inadvertent fuel transfer in the air from the evidence available in previous incidents in flight and contained in the fuel logs.
(d) Failure of other operators of Argonauts who had learned by experience of the possibility of inadvertent fuel transfer in flight to inform the Air Registration Board, the Directorate of Flight Safety of the Board of Trade or its predecessors, or the United Kingdom Flight Safety Committee of the facts which they had learned so that these might be communicated to other operators of Argonauts and other aircraft equipped with similar systems and fuel cocks.”

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Today is Friday the 1st of June, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 08:36

We end the week and start the new month with the following stories…

Of note, today is the 19th anniversary of AA Flight 1420, the MD-82 crash at KLIT where 11 people were killed. The NTSB issued 22 safety recommendations after their investigation, of which 6 included ARFF (one of which called for a minimum staffing level). If you have a few moments, take a read of the report as well as the list of recommendations and their status after all these years. Have a great weekend, stay safe!

Tom

 

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Pilot walks away after crashing plane on I-80 near Evanston, Wyoming

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 08:23

by Jennifer Weaver

(KUTV) — Uinta County Fire and Ambulance reported a single engine place crash at milepost 7 on Interstate 80 near Evanston, Wyoming.

The crash was reported before 6 p.m., Thursday. The pilot walked away from the crash without injury, according to a Facebook post by the county agency.

Allen Kenitzer, Federal Aviation Administration Office of Communuications, confirmed that an experimental BF9-2 airplane crashed under unknown circumstances when it’s engine stalled.

He said the aircraft attempted to land on I-80 when it clipped a semi truck and flipped over.

The aircraft was traveling from Longmont, Colo. to Bountiful, Utah, Kenitzer told 2News.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident further.

http://kutv.com/news/local/pilot-walks-away-after-crashing-plane-on-i-80-near-evanston-wyoming

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FAA: Two people onboard of airplane that crashed at Midland International Airport

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 08:22

MIDLAND — UPDATE:9:27 p.m.

According to FAA, the plane involved in the crash was a single-engine Cirrus SR22.

It crashed under unknown circumstances around 7:20 p.m. Thursday, shortly after taking off from Midland International Air & Space Port.

The aircraft departed from Runway 16 and was preparing to exit the traffic pattern when it crashed near the approach end of Runway 10, starting a fire.

Initial reports state that two people were onboard at the time.

MPD tells CBS 7 that DPS conducted a brief areal survey by helicopter to gather information on the crash.

We are also told that there is currently no disruption for inbound or outbound flights at this time.
___

ORIGINAL STORY: Authorities responded to an airplane crash at Midland International Air and Space Port on Thursday evening.

Police tell CBS 7 that a crash involving a small plane happened at 7:15 p.m.

There’s no word yet on how many people were aboard the plane at the time or if anyone was injured.

DPS and the FAA are investigating the crash.

http://www.cbs7.com/content/news/Midland-Police-responding-to-airplane-crash–484236821.html

The post FAA: Two people onboard of airplane that crashed at Midland International Airport appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Pilot Suffers Seizure Mid-Flight, Causes Emergency Landing Of Allegiant Air Plane

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 08:21

By Pritha Paul @ZiggyZina143 

An Allegiant Air flight that took off from Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport on Thursday was on its way to Punta Gorda, Florida, when it was diverted after its pilot suffered a seizure midway.

Instead, Allegiant Flight 1304, which left Kentucky just before 7 a.m. local time (EDT), landed at Gainesville Regional Airport, Florida, at around 8:30 a.m. local time (EDT).

According to USA Today-affiliated Cincinnati.com, the airlines issued the following statement regarding the incident:

“Today (Thursday, May 31) on flight 1304 from Cincinnati to Punta Gorda, a pilot experienced a medical emergency. The crew acted quickly and diverted to Gainesville, Florida to arrange immediate medical assistance. The flight landed normally, and the pilot is being treated at a local hospital. He is in stable condition, and walked off the aircraft upon landing.”

Photos from the scene showed emergency vehicles arriving to meet the plane at the tarmac.

According to Allegiant spokeswoman Krysta Levy, the Airbus A320, was carrying 155 passengers and six crew members at the time of the incident.

Levy added a new flight crew was assigned to the plane after it landed at the Gainesville Regional Airport as the pilot, whose identity has not been revealed, was deemed unfit to fly the plane. The flight was scheduled to resume its journey shortly after 3 p.m. local time (EDT).

“We provided lunch and compensation while the passengers waited through the delay, and we sincerely appreciate their patience and understanding,” she said.

The Gainesville fire department tweeted saying, “At GNV airport to Airbus 320 landed safely. GFR and ACFR emergency medical responders treating the pilot.”

They added the pilot was transported to a nearby hospital and was in a stable condition.

Airport public relations officer Erin Porter said after an emergency landing on the runway, the plane was parked on the ramp.

“Gainesville Regional Airport is always prepared to assist in this sort of situation,” she said.

Passenger Ellie Fllower, who was onboard the flight at the time, described the situation as “scary.”

“It was scary when the plane was going down because the crew started running towards the front, and nobody really knew what was going on,” said Fllower, ABC-affiliated My Sun Coast reported. “It didn’t seem like any passengers were sick so we were confused.”

No passenger was injured as flight crew managed to step in for the pilot and land the plane safely, chief Don Campbell, with the Gainesville Fire Rescue, said.

This is not the first time flight attendants were called in to assist the pilot to land a plane. Back in March last year, a TUIfly plane was travelling from Hanover, Germany, to Mallorca, Spain, when a co-pilot of the plane began to feel unwell and after a visit to the restroom, felt the need to lie down. After a doctor onboard the flight examined the co-pilot, he was diagnosed with extremely low blood pressure.

Although the healthier co-pilot was perfectly capable of landing the aircraft with a pilot short, he decided to not to take any chances and asked one of the flight attendants to assist him in conducting all the pre-flight checks before landing the plane.

http://www.ibtimes.com/pilot-suffers-seizure-mid-flight-causes-emergency-landing-allegiant-air-plane-2686310

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SMELLY AIRLINE PASSENGER FORCES EMERGENCY LANDING AS FELLOW TRAVELERS VOMIT AND FAINT

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 08:19

BY DAVID BRENNAN

A passenger jet was forced into an emergency landing on Tuesday as panicked travelers fainted in their seats and vomited in the aisles.

Though it may sound like the opening scene of an apocalyptic pandemic movie, the emergency landing was actually forced by a passenger who smelled as if he hadn’t washed for several weeks, Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf reported.

The Dutch Transavia Airlines flight was heading to Amsterdam from the Spanish island of Gran Canaria off the coast of northwest Africa. But before it got there, passengers began to gag and become violently ill.

“From the moment he stepped into the aisle, people began to scream and dived into their bags looking for handkerchiefs to keep in front of them,” passenger Piet van Haut told De Telegraaf. Cabin crew tried in vain to cover the stench with perfume, but nothing could mask it.

Van Haut explained to Belgian news website VRT: “It was a huge stench…The smell made me think that the man hadn’t washed for weeks.”

The crew eventually moved the man to sit in the toilet at the back of the plane to try and protect his fellow passengers from the smell. However, even that wasn’t enough, forcing the pilots to make an emergency landing in Faro, Portugal.

The man was then handed over to a waiting ambulance and medical team, before the flight continued on to its destination. Transavia confirmed that a man had been removed from the flight for “medical reasons, but it is indeed right that he smelled quite a bit,” according to Euro Weekly News.

The culprit may have left, but his influence lingered. Though food and drink was supposed to be served during the journey, cabin crew decided not to because the odor was so strong.

The plane eventually made it to Amsterdam, some two hours after it was scheduled to land. “Nobody could stand the stench,” Van Haut said. “I heard someone say that the stench was worse than that of a corpse that had been decomposing for a month. It was an untenable situation,” Van Haut said.

This is not the first time Transavia has dealt with a smelly passenger. In February, a fight broke out between two men on a flight from Dubai to Amsterdam after one traveler kept breaking wind, despite repeated requests for him to stop.

After the pilot reported “passengers on the rampage,” the plane landed in Vienna so the men could be removed. Two sisters sitting nearby were also taken off the flight, though they claimed they had nothing to do with the fracas. The sisters, who are of Moroccan-Dutch descent, are now suing the airline for racial profiling.

Transavia said the two sisters were involved in the brawl and have banned all four passengers from future flights.

http://www.newsweek.com/smelly-airline-passenger-forces-emergency-landing-fellow-travelers-vomit-and-952482?piano_t=1

The post SMELLY AIRLINE PASSENGER FORCES EMERGENCY LANDING AS FELLOW TRAVELERS VOMIT AND FAINT appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 08:14

19 Years ago today: On 1 June 1999 an American Airlines MD-82 overran the runway at Little Rock, AR, in poor weather killing 11 occupants.

Date: Tuesday 1 June 1999 Time: 23:51 Type: McDonnell Douglas DC-9-82 (MD-82) Operator: American Airlines Registration: N215AA C/n / msn: 49163/1111 First flight: 1983 Total airframe hrs: 49136 Cycles: 27103 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-217C Crew: Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 6 Passengers: Fatalities: 10 / Occupants: 139 Total: Fatalities: 11 / Occupants: 145 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Little Rock National Airport, AR (LIT) (   United States of America) Crash site elevation: 80 m (262 feet) amsl Phase: Landing (LDG) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, TX (DFW/KDFW), United States of America Destination airport: Little Rock National Airport, AR (LIT/KLIT), United States of America Flightnumber: AA1420

Narrative:
American Airlines Flight 1420, from Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) to Little Rock (LIT), was scheduled to depart about 20:28 and arrive about 21:41. However, the airplane originally intended to be used for the flight was delayed in its arrival to Dallas/Fort Worth because of adverse weather in the area. After 21:00, the first officer notified gate agents that flight 1420 would need to depart by 23:16 because of American’s company duty time limitation. Another aircraft was arranged and the flight departed at 22:40. About 22:54, the flight dispatcher sent the flight crew an ACARS message indicating that the weather around Little Rock might be a factor during the arrival. The dispatcher suggested that the flight crew expedite the arrival to beat the thunderstorms if possible, and the flight crew acknowledged this message. About 23:04, the Fort Worth center broadcast an NWS Convective SIGMET [significant meteorological information] weather advisory for an area of severe thunderstorms that included the Little Rock airport area. The flight crew discussed the weather and the need to expedite the approach. At 23:25:47, the captain stated, “we got to get over there quick.” About 5 seconds later, the first officer said, “I don’t like that…that’s lightning,” to which the captain replied, “sure is.” The flight crew had the city of Little Rock and the airport area in sight by 23:26. Fort Worth center cleared the flight to descend to 10,000 feet msl. The flight was transferred to the Memphis ARTCC and at 23:34, the flight crew contacted the Little Rock Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT). The controller advised the flight crew that a thunderstorm located northwest of the airport was moving through the area and that the wind was 280º at 28 knots gusting to 44 knots. The first officer told the controller that he and the captain could see the lightning. The controller told the flight crew to expect an ILS approach to runway 22L. At 23:36, the captain and first officer discussed American Airlines’ crosswind limitation for landing. The captain indicated that 30 knots was the crosswind limitation but realized that he had provided the limitation for a dry runway. The captain then stated that the wet runway crosswind limitation was 20 knots, but the first officer stated that the limitation was 25 knots. At 23:39:00, the controller cleared the flight to descend to an altitude of 3,000 feet msl. The controller then asked the flight crew about the weather conditions along the runway 22L final approach course, stating his belief that the airplane’s weather radar was “a lot better” than the weather radar depiction available in the tower. At 23:39:12, the first officer stated, “okay, we can…see the airport from here. We can barely make it out but we should be able to make [runway] two two…that storm is moving this way like your radar says it is but a little bit farther off than you thought.” The controller then offered flight 1420 a visual approach to the runway, but the first officer indicated, “at this point, we really can’t make it out. We’re gonna have to stay with you as long as possible.” At 23:39:45, the controller notified flight 1420 of a windshear alert, reporting that the centerfield wind was 340º at 10 knots, the north boundary wind was 330º at 25 knots, and the northwest boundary wind was 010º at 15 knots. The flight crew then requested runway 04R so that there would be a headwind, rather than a tailwind, during landing. At 23:40:20, the controller instructed the flight crew to fly a heading of 250º for vectors to the runway 04R ILS final approach course. After reaching the assigned heading, the airplane was turned away from the airport and clear of the thunderstorm that had previously been reported by the controller. Between 23:40:46 and 23:41:31, the first officer stated the localizer frequency and course, the decision altitude, the minimum safe altitude, and a portion of the missed approach procedure for runway 04R. The captain then asked the first officer, “do you have the airport? Is that it right there? I don’t see a runway.” At 23:42:27, the controller told the flight crew that the second part of the thunderstorm was apparently moving through the area and that the winds were 340º at 16 knots gusting to 34 knots. At 23:42:40, the first officer asked the captain whether he wanted to accept “a short approach” and “keep it in tight.” The captain answered, “yeah, if you see the runway. ‘cause I don’t quite see it.” The first officer stated, “yeah, it’s right here, see it?” The captain replied, “you just point me in the right direction and I’ll start slowing down here.” At 23:42:55, the first officer said, “it’s going right over the…field.” The first officer then told the controller, “well we got the airport. We’re going between clouds. I think it’s right off my, uh, three o’clock low, about four miles.” The controller then offered a visual approach for runway 04R, and the first officer accepted. At 23:43:11, the controller cleared flight 1420 for a visual approach to runway 04R and indicated “if you lose it, need some help, let me know please.” At 23:43:35, the first officer stated, “you’re comin’ in. There’s the airport.” Three seconds later, the captain stated, “uh, I lost it,” to which the first officer replied, “see it’s right there.” The captain then stated, “I still don’t see it…just vector me. I don’t know.” At 23:43:59, the controller cleared flight 1420 to land and indicated that the winds were 330º at 21 knots. At 23:44:19, the captain stated, “see we’re losing it. I don’t think we can maintain visual.” At 23:44:30, the first officer informed the controller that visual contact with the airport had been lost because of a cloud between the airplane and the airport. The controller then cleared the airplane to fly a heading of 220º for radar vectors for the ILS approach to runway 04R and directed the flight to descend to and maintain 2,300 feet msl. At 23:45:47, the first officer told the controller “we’re getting pretty close to this storm. we’ll keep it tight if we have to.” The controller indicated to the flight crew that, “when you join the final, you’re going to be right at just a little bit outside the marker if that’s gonna be okay for ya.” The captain stated, “that’s great,” and the first officer told the controller, “that’s great with us.” At 23:46:39, the controller advised the flight crew that the airplane was 3 miles from the outer marker. At 23:46:52, the captain stated, “aw, we’re goin’ right into this.” At the same time, the controller reported that there was heavy rain at the airport, the ATIS information in effect at the time was no longer current, the visibility was less than 1 mile, and the runway visual range (RVR) for runway 04R was 3,000 feet. The first officer acknowledged this information. At 23:47:08, the controller again cleared flight 1420 to land and indicated that the wind was 350º at 30 knots gusting to 45 knots. The first officer then read back the wind information as 030º at 45 knots. At 23:47:22, the captain stated, “three thousand RVR. We can’t land on that.” Four seconds later, the first officer indicated that the RVR for runway 04R was 2,400 feet, and the captain then said, “okay, fine.” At 23:47:44, the captain stated, “landing gear down.” About 5 seconds later, the captain stated, “and lights please.” At 23:47:53, the controller issued a second windshear alert for the airport, reporting that the centerfield wind was 350º at 32 knots gusting to 45 knots, the north boundary wind was 310º at 29 knots, and the northeast boundary wind was 320º at 32 knots. This transmission was not acknowledged by the flight crew. At 23:48:10, the captain stated, “add twenty [knots],” to which the first officer replied, “right.” At 23:48:12, the controller reported that the runway 04R RVR was now 1,600 feet. About 23:48:18, the captain indicated that the flight was established on final approach; 6 seconds later, the first officer informed the controller that the flight was established on the inbound portion of the ILS. The controller repeated the clearance to land; stated that the wind was 340º at 31 knots, the north boundary wind was 300º at 26 knots, and the northeast boundary wind was 320º at 25 knots; and repeated the RVR. At 23:48:41, the first officer acknowledged this information. The controller did not receive any further transmissions from flight 1420. At 23:49:02, the first officer asked the captain, “want forty flaps?” The captain indicated that he thought he had already called for the landing flaps, after which the first officer stated, “forty now.” At 23:49:10, the controller informed the flight crew that the wind was 330º at 28 knots. Two seconds later, the captain stated, “this is a can of worms.” The first officer stated, “there’s the runway off to your right, got it?” at 23:49:24. The captain replied, “no,” to which the first officer stated, “I got the runway in sight. You’re right on course. Stay where you’re at.” The captain then stated, “I got it. I got it.” At 23:49:32, the controller reported the wind to be 330º at 25 knots. At 23:49:53, the controller reported the wind to be 320º at 23 knots. From about 400 feet above field level (afl) the airplane drifted to the right. At 23:50:00, the first officer said, “we’re way off.” The localizer deviation value was about one dot to the right at that point. About 1 second later, the captain stated, “I can’t see it.” About 3 seconds afterward, the first officer asked, “got it?” to which the captain replied, “yeah I got it.” At 23:50:13 and :14, the GPWS radio altitude callout “sink rate” sounded. The airplane touched down on the runway about 23:50:20. About 23:50:22, the first officer stated “we’re down;” about 2 seconds later, he stated, “we’re sliding.” Over a 7-second period after touchdown, both thrust reversers were deployed and the left and right engines’ engine pressure ratios (EPR) reached settings of 1.89 and 1.67, respectively. The thrust reversers were subsequently moved to the unlocked status (neither deployed nor stowed). The flight spoilers did not deploy symmetrically at touchdown. About the time that the brakes were applied, the thrust reversers were deployed again. At 23:50:32, the CVR recorded an unidentified voice in the cockpit stating “on the brakes.” The left engine reached a maximum setting of 1.98 reverse EPR, and the right engine reached a setting of 1.64 reverse EPR. The left brake pedal was relaxed at 23:50:34 before returning to its full position 2 seconds later. About the time that the left brake pedal was relaxed, the reversers were returned to the unlocked status. As the right thrust reverser was being moved to the unlocked status, the right engine reached a maximum setting of 1.74 reverse EPR. At 23:50:36, a full aileron deflection was given. At 23:50:40, the left thrust reverser was moved back to the deployed position, but the right reverser moved briefly to the deployed position and then moved to the stowed position. According to FDR data, the left thrust reverser remained deployed, and the right thrust reverser remained stowed, for the remainder of the flight. After departing the end of the runway, the airplane struck several tubes extending outward from the left edge of the instrument landing system localizer array, located 411 feet beyond the end of the runway; passed through a chain link security fence; went down a rock embankment to a flood plain, located approximately 15 feet below the runway elevation; and collided with the structure supporting the runway 22L approach lighting system.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The flight crew’s failure to discontinue the approach when severe thunderstorms and their associated hazards to flight operations had moved into the airport area and the flight crew’s failure to ensure that the spoilers had extended after touchdown. Contributing to the accident were the flight crew’s (1) impaired performance resulting from fatigue and the situational stress associated with the intent to land under the circumstances, (2) continuation of the approach to a landing when the company’s maximum crosswind component was exceeded, and (3) use of reverse thrust greater than 1.3 engine pressure ratio after landing. ”

Download report:  Final report

Twenty-two safety recommendations were issued to the FAA (and another two reinstated); and two issued to the National Weather Service. Recommendations included a.o. changes to procedures regarding automatic spoiler systems; access to weather information; communications between ATC and ARFF.

NTSB issued 24 Safety Recommendations

Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-49 For all 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 and 135 operators of airplanes equipped with automatic spoiler systems, require dual crewmember confirmation before landing that the spoilers have been armed, and verify that these operators include this procedure in their flight manuals, checklists, and training programs. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-50 For all 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 and 135 operators, require a callout if the spoilers do not automatically or manually deploy during landing and a callout when the spoilers have deployed, and verify that these operators include these procedures in their flight manuals, checklists, and training programs. The procedures should clearly identify which pilot is responsible for making these callouts and which pilot is responsible for deploying the spoilers if they do not automatically or manually deploy. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-51 Issue a flight standards information bulletin that requires the use of 1.3 engine pressure ratio as the maximum reverse thrust power for MD-80 series airplanes under wet or slippery runway conditions, except in an emergency in which directional control can be sacrificed for decreased stopping distance. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-52 Require principal operations inspectors of all operators of MD-80 series airplanes to review and determine that these operators\’ flight manuals and training programs contain information on the decrease in rudder effectiveness when reverse thrust power in excess of 1.3 engine pressure ratio is applied. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-53 Require all operators of MD-80 series airplanes to require a callout if reverse thrust power exceeds the operators\’ specific engine pressure ratio settings. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-54 For all 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 and 135 operators, require the use of automatic brakes, if available and operative, for landings during wet, slippery, or high crosswind conditions, and verify that these operators include this procedure in their flight manuals, checklists, and training programs. (Closed – Acceptable Alternate Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-55 Establish a joint Government-industry working group to address, understand, and develop effective operational strategies and guidance to reduce thunderstorm penetrations, and verify that these strategies and guidance materials are incorporated into air carrier flight manuals and training programs as the strategies become available. The working group should focus its efforts on all facets of the airspace system, including ground- and cockpit-based solutions. The near-term goal of the working group should be to establish clear and objective criteria to facilitate recognition of cues associated with severe convective activity and guidance to improve flight crew decision-making. (Closed – Unacceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-56 Incorporate, at all air traffic control facilities, a near-real-time color weather radar display that shows detailed precipitation intensities. This display could be incorporated by configuring existing and planned Terminal Doppler Weather Radar or Weather Systems Processor systems with this capability or by procuring, within 1 year, a commercial computer weather program currently available through the Internet or existing stand-alone computer hardware that displays the closest single-site Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler data or regional mosaic images. (Closed – Unacceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-57 Provide U.S. air carriers operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 access to Terminal Doppler Weather Radar, at airports where the system is available, and access to the Weather Systems Processor, when it becomes available, so that their flight dispatch offices can use this information in planning, releasing, and following flights during periods in which hazardous weather might impact safety of flight. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-58 In cooperation with the National Weather Service, ensure that Center Weather Service Units are adequately staffed at all times when any significant weather is forecast. (Closed – Acceptable Alternate Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-59 Modify automated weather systems to accept runway visual range (RVR) data directly from RVR sensors. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-60 Maintain at least a 48-hour archive of 1-minute runway visual range data. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-61 Provide additional information on the Low Level Windshear Alert System (LLWAS) in the Aeronautical Information Manual, including that an LLWAS alert is a valid indicator of windshear or a microburst. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-62 Issue a mandatory briefing item to tower controllers that describes the circumstances of this accident, including the interactions between the controller and Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) crews. This briefing item should emphasize that location information provided to ARFF crews should be as complete and specific as possible to minimize opportunities for confusion. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-63 Amend Federal Aviation Administration Order 7110.65, “Air Traffic Control,” to require controllers to monitor the progress of Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting crews responding to emergencies to ensure that the response is consistent with known location information. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-64 Amend Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Order 7210.3R, “Facility Operation and Administration,” to direct tower managers to establish mutual annual briefings between air traffic control (ATC) and Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) personnel to ensure that these personnel have a common understanding of the local airport emergency plan and sections of the FAA\’s Advisory Circular 150/5210-7C, “Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Communications,” that are applicable to local ATC/ARFF emergency response procedures. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-65 Amend 14 Code of Federal Regulations 139.319(j) to require a minimum Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting staffing level that would allow exterior firefighting and rapid entry into an airplane to perform interior firefighting and rescue of passengers and crewmembers. (Closed – Unacceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-66 Evaluate crash detection and location technologies, select the most promising candidate(s) for ensuring that emergency responders could expeditiously arrive at an accident scene, and implement a requirement to install and use the equipment. (Closed – Unacceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-67 Develop specific criteria, using the Federal Railroad Administration\’s requirements as guidance, to be evaluated during a postaccident interagency emergency response critique, and amend 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 139 to require airport operators to conduct this critique within 60 days after any air carrier accident and provide the results of the critique to the Federal Aviation Administration. (Closed – Acceptable Alternate Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-68 Conduct research activities to determine if recent technological advances would enable submerged low-impact structures and other nonfrangible structures at airports to be converted to frangible ones. (Open – Acceptable Response) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-69 Define detailed parameters for a stabilized approach, develop detailed criteria indicating when a missed approach should be performed, and ensure that all 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 and 135 carriers include this information in their flight manuals and training programs. (Closed – Unacceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: FAA A-01-70 Provide additional personnel to accomplish direct oversight of American Airlines\’ flight training and flight operations, and include the principal operations inspector for American in decisions regarding where these personnel are to be placed. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: National Weather Service A-01-71 In cooperation with the Federal Aviation Administration, ensure that Center Weather Service Units are adequately staffed at all times when any significant weather is forecast. (Closed – Acceptable Action) Issued: 10-DEC-2001 To: National Weather Service A-01-72 Eliminate the Automated Surface Observing System lockout feature as soon as possible. (Closed – Acceptable Action)

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Today is Thursday the 31st of May, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 07:42

We close out the month of May with the following stories…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Small plane crashes on Long Island, pilot dead

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 07:39

MELVILLE, Suffolk County (WABC) —

A small vintage plane crashed in Suffolk County on Long Island Wednesday afternoon, killing the pilot. 

Authorities said the pilot, identified as Ken Johansen, was the only one on board the small plane that crashed at 1:52 p.m. along Northcote Drive in Melville.

The plane took down a number of trees as it was on the way down but did not hit any houses. It landed about 200 feet from the nearest home, authorities said.

No one on the ground was injured.

College student Lauren Peller was in her home with her mother when the plane went down across the street next to woods.

“We heard a loud noise, almost like a tree fell on the house, and we ran down the stairs and there was smoke and the plane was on fire,” said Peller, adding that her mother then called 911.

The crash involved a GEICO Skytypers plane from Republic Airport in East Farmingdale.

Johansen was a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, a Naval aviator, and a professional airline pilot. He leaves behind a wife and two children.

An investigation is underway involving the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board. 

The World Famous GEICO Skytypers Air Show Team is a flight squadron of six vintage WWII aircraft based on Long Island performing precision flight maneuvers at select air shows across the US.

Eyewitness News flew with the group ahead of the Bethpage Air Show last weekend.

“A careful and thorough investigation is already under way,” Skytypers said in statement. “We are working with local law enforcement, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the National Transportation Safety Board. Our thoughts are with Ken and his family.”

Johansen first flew with the Skytypers at the age of 8, according to his bio posted on the stunt team’s website. It said he “caught the aviation bug early in his life” from his Skytyping instructor pilot father.

http://abc7ny.com/small-plane-crashes-on-long-island/3540092/

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