ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

‘It All Worked’: Pilot Executes Perfect Crash Landing

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 13:03

By Jeff Todd

BROOMFIELD, Colo. (CBS4) – A pilot and his trainee say they’re lucky to be alive after putting their plane down at the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport without the landing gear working properly.  

Davide Picard was doing training with his co-pilot. The two had gone to Greeley because of the long runway, but during the first landing attempt Picard felt a problem.

“I land on the gear, before I load put load onto it, I feel for it, and it didn’t feel right,” Picard said. “I knew right away we had a collapsed main.”

Picard tried another landing, then flew to Boulder and tried two more landings but felt the right side continue to give out.

“Then I knew I had to go to Jeffco (RMMA) and we were going to ditch this plane,” Picard said. “I knew landing in the grass if anything would be way better.”

The two flew the plane until it had just a few drops of fuel left. On the final approach the right engine ran out of fuel.

“I’m trying to just come in as slow as possible. I touchdown on the left felt it, touched again, and then boom it collapsed but see how I lifted the wing. The fuel is all in those tanks, had I scraped those, boom like a bomb,” Picard told CBS4.

“And realizing that wow this worked, it all worked,” he said.

Picard is getting his plane inspected but expects it to be totaled. He hopes the Cessna 310G is salvageable so he can rebuild the plane he’s flown in almost daily since 1982.

http://denver.cbslocal.com/2017/09/02/plane-emergency-landing-broomfield/

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Private helicopter loses power, crashes south of Burnet

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 12:50

By Jerry Becker

BURNET, Texas (KXAN) – A private helicopter crashed south of Burnet late Saturday afternoon, said the Federal Aviation Administration.

FAA said the aircraft – a Hughes 369 A – lost power near Burnet Municipal Airport and crashed on US 281 while attempting to make an emergency landing.

There were four people on board, said Burnet Police Chief Paul Nelson. He said two of them were taken to the hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening. The other two people were uninjured.

Chief Nelson said the call for the crash came in at about 4:30 p.m.

The FAA is investigating the crash.

Private helicopter loses power, crashes south of Burnet

 

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Gwinnett police helicopter crashes at Briscoe Field, two officers injured

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 12:49

By Cailin O’Brien

Two Gwinnett County Police officers were taken to the hospital after their helicopter unit — “Air One” — crashed at Briscoe Field in Lawrenceville on Friday. 

“Both of our officers were conscious, alert,” said Cpl. Michele Pihera. “They were talking. Their family members have been notified of what had happened.”

Pihera said the department wasn’t ready to release the names of either pilot, yet.

Gwinnett fire and police received calls about the crash just before 11 a.m.

The officers had been using one of the department’s two helicopters to assist ground officers chase a wanted suspect earlier in the morning. While they were in the air, the pilots began to notice a shift in the weather.

“As you know, it’s windy here today and a storm was coming in,” Pihera said from the scene. “So they notified the ground officers that they needed to go back to the hangar.”

They didn’t quite make it. The helicopter went down just 200 yards from the police department’s hangar at Gwinnett County Airport at Briscoe Field, a municipal airport owned and operated by Gwinnett County. The airport has been closed since 11 a.m. and the Federal Aviation Administration came on the scene just after noon to investigate.

It wasn’t an ideal situation, but Pihera said she’s thankful it wasn’t worse.

“We are thankful that they crashed here and not over a neighborhood or a school or (Georgia Highway) 316,” she said.

One of the officers was able to climb out of the wreckage immediately. The other had his legs pinned inside helicopter. Gwinnett County Fire Department personnel helped him escape. Both were taken to Gwinnett Medical Center in Lawrenceville.

It was unclear as of Friday evening whether ‘Air One’ can be repaired.

“At this time, it’s unknown how far off the ground the helicopter was before it crashed,” Pihera said.

But the department’s main priority right now is focusing on the two officers piloting the helicopter.

“We’re just so happy that they survived these injuries and at this time it does not look like their injuries will be life-threatening,” Pihera said.

Return to www.gwinnettdailypost.com for updates.

http://www.gwinnettdailypost.com/local/gwinnett-police-helicopter-crashes-at-briscoe-field-two-officers-injured/article_b78c4a08-d93e-5e84-817b-a661c9d2bd07.html

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Small plane skids off runway, into water at Albert Whitted Airport

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 12:46

By Sara DiNatale and Josh Solomon, Times Staff Writers

ST. PETERSBURG — A small aircraft ended up in the waters of Tampa Bay on Friday after it rolled off the end of a runway at Albert Whitted Airport. 

After the crash, an unidentified person jumped into the water to help retrieve the pilot and passenger, neither of whom were gravely injured, according to the Coast Guard.

The plane, a kit aircraft manufactured by Velocity, a Sebastian, Fla. company, skidded off the southern end of the north-south runway that parallels the bay at the St. Petersburg airport about 10:45 a.m.

Once the plane went in, the good Samaritan worked to free the pilot, 78-year-old Gerald Kerr, from the cockpit as it filled with water. The passenger, Elizabeth Reynolds, 72, was already out of the plane.

Coast Guard rescuers, who were on scene within minutes as their base neighbors the airport, threw the bystander a line to pass to Kerr to help pull him to safety. Soon the pair was safely aboard a vessel.

“It’s a good spot to have an accident if you’re going to have one,” said Coast Guard spokesman Grant Burns, remarking on the proximity to the base Sector St. Petersburg.

Kerr and Reynolds were shaken relatively calm once they were rescued, Burns said. The pair was taken to Bayfront Health St. Petersburg, but neither were seriously injured.

Neither could be reached for comment Friday.

Kerr told rescuers the plane slid off the runway during takeoff, however officials suggested the accident happened during landing. The pair’s itinerary was unclear. Airport Manager Rich Lesniak said the plane was not based at Whitted.

The accident closed the airport to air traffic for about 45 minutes Friday morning, Lensiak said. By 11:30 a.m. the east-west runway, designated 7/25, was reopened. The accident runway, 18/36, was reopened about 12:30 p.m.

Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane was assembled by Kerr and is owned by Gulf Kilo Inc., a company registered in Parma, Ohio. The FAA is investigating the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine probable cause, FAA officials said.

http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/accidents/plane-skids-into-water-near-albert-whitted-airport-in-st-petersburg/2335948#

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Pilot safe after crash landing in Harpswell field

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 12:44

By DARCIE MOORE

The pilot of a plane that crash landed in a field in Harpswell Friday evening was the only person onboard and able to walk away. 

It appears that there was a mechanical issue that caused the pilot to bring the fixed wing, single engine plane down in a field at 595 Harpswell Islands Road. The Cessna Stationair hit a rock and overturned during the landing. The crash was reported at approximately 5:10 p.m.

The plane carried the name Penobscot Island Air out of Owls Head.

The Harpswell Neck and Orr’s and Bailey Islands fire departments responded to the incident.

The FAA is expected to be at the scene of the crash in the morning to investigate.

http://www.timesrecord.com/news/2017-09-01/Front_Page/Pilot_safe_after_crash_landing_in_Harpswell_field.html

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 12:42

46 Years ago today: On 4 September 1971 an Alaska Airlines Boeing 727 crashed into mountain after premature descent into Juneau, AK, USA killing all 111 occupants.

Date: Saturday 4 September 1971 Time: 12:15 Type: Boeing 727-193 Operator: Alaska Airlines Registration: N2969G C/n / msn: 19304/287 First flight: 1966-06-24 (5 years 2 months) Total airframe hrs: 11344 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7B Crew: Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 104 / Occupants: 104 Total: Fatalities: 111 / Occupants: 111 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 35 km (21.9 mls) W of Juneau, AK (   United States of America) Crash site elevation: 754 m (2474 feet) amsl Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Yakutat Airport, AK (YAK/PAYA), United States of America Destination airport: Juneau International Airport, AK (JNU/PAJN), United States of America Flightnumber: 1866

Narrative:
Alaska Airlines, Flight 1866 (AS66) was a scheduled passenger flight from Anchorage (ANC), to Seattle (SEA), with intermediate stops at Cordova (CDV), Yakutat (YAK), Juneau (JNU), and Sitka (SIT). The IFR flight departed Anchorage at 09:13 and landed at Cordova at 09:42. AS66 departed Cordova at 10:34 after a delay, part of which was attributable to difficulty in securing a cargo compartment door. The flight landed at Yakutat at 11:07. While on the ground, AS66 received an air traffic control clearance to the Juneau Airport via Jet Route 507 to the Pleasant Intersection, direct to Juneau, to maintain 9,000 feet or below until 15 miles southeast of Yakutat on course, then to climb to and maintain FL230. The flight departed Yakutat at 11:35, with 104 passengers and seven crew members on board.
At 11:46, AS66 contacted the Anchorage ARTCC and reported level at FL230, 65 miles east of Yakutat. The flight was then cleared to descend at the pilot’s discretion to maintain 10,000 ft so as to cross the Pleasant Intersection at 10,000 feet and was issued a clearance limit to the Howard Intersection.
The clearance was acknowledged correctly by the captain and the controller provided the Juneau altimeter setting of 29.46 inches and requested AS66 to report leaving 11,000 ft. At 11:51, AS66 reported leaving FL230. Following this report, the flight’s clearance limit was changed to the Pleasant Intersection. At 11:54, the controller instructed AS66 to maintain 12,000 feet. Approximately 1 minute later, the flight reported level at 12,000 feet. The changes to the flight’s original clearance to the Howard Intersection were explained to AS66 by the controller as follows: “I’ve got an airplane that’s not following his clearance, I’ve got to find out where he is.” The controller was referring to N799Y, a Piper Apache which had departed Juneau at 11:44 on an IFR clearance, destination Whitehorse, Canada.
On two separate occasions, AS66 acted as communications relay between the controller and N799Y.
At 11:58, AS66 reported that they were at the Pleasant Intersection, entering the holding pattern, whereupon the controller recleared the flight to Howard Intersection via the Juneau localizer. In response to the controller’s query as to whether the flight was “on top” at 12,000 feet, the captain stated that the flight was “on instruments.” At 12:00, the controller repeated the flight’s clearance to hold at Howard Intersection and issued an expected approach time of 12:10. At 12:01, AS66 reported that they were at Howard, holding 12,000 feet. Six minutes later, AS66 was queried with respect to the flight’s direction of holding and its position in the holding pattern. When the controller was advised that the flight had just completed its inbound turn and was on the localizer, inbound to Howard, he cleared AS66 for a straight-in LDA approach, to cross Howard at or below 9,000 feet inbound. The captain acknowledged the clearance and reported leaving 12,000 feet. At 12:08 the captain reported “leaving five thousand five … four thousand five hundred,” whereupon the controller instructed AS66 to contact Juneau Tower. Contact with the tower was established shortly thereafter when the captain reported, “Alaska sixty-six Barlow inbound.” (Barlow Intersection is located about 10 nautical miles west of the Juneau Airport). The Juneau Tower Controller responded, “Alaska 66, understand, ah, I didn’t, ah, copy the intersection, landing runway 08, the wind 080° at 22 occasional gusts to 28, the altimeter now 29.47, time is 09 1/2, call us by Barlow”. No further communication was heard from the flight.
The Boeing 727 impacted the easterly slope of a canyon in the Chilkat Range of the Tongass National Forest at the 2475-foot level. The aircraft disintegrated on impact.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: PROBABLE CAUSE: “A display of misleading navigational information concerning the flight’s progress along the localizer course which resulted in a premature descent below obstacle clearance altitude. The origin or nature of the misleading navigational information could not be determined. The Board further concludes that the crew did not use all available navigational aids to check the flight’s progress along the localizer nor were these aids required to be used. The crew also did not perform the required audio identification of the pertinent navigational facilities.”

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Today is Friday the 1st of September, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 09:54

We end the week and start the new month with the following stories…

Have a good weekend,

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Witnesses describe deadly Fishers plane crash

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 09:51

FISHERS, Ind. — Investigators are working to determine what caused a deadly crash Thursday morning at Indianapolis Metropolitan Airport after a small plane burst into flames shortly after takeoff.

The sole passenger of the single-propeller aircraft was killed about 11:15 a.m. at the airport near East 96th Street and Allisonville Road, authorities said. The pilot has not been identified. 

Preliminary information indicates that the plane, a Van’s RV-12, crashed under unknown circumstances and caught fire shortly after departing the airport, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Tony Molinaro said.

Molinaro said damage to the plane was “substantial.”

Hamilton County Coroner John Chalfin said he was informed before receiving the body that the man had trauma to his upper body and face and that his legs were charred by fire.

Authorities did not have any preliminary identification, so Chaflin said he would try to determine who the pilot was by any identifying scars or other marks.

Jay Nolan, a barista at Starbucks on East 96th Street, said she had a clear view of the plane crash through the coffee shop’s large windows. Whether the plane was returning to the airfield immediately after takeoff was unclear.

“It just looked like he came in fast and low then exploded,” Nolan said.

Grant Kirsh, an Indianapolis lawyer who takes flight lessons about three times a week at Metropolitan, said an official at the airport told him the pilot was not one of the 150 airplane owners based there.

“It was someone new to the airport,” said Kirsh, whose father, Joel Kirsh, flies at Metropolitan one to three times a week.

Kirsh said he was told the plane overran the runway and crashed when the plane left the landing strip. He said he drove by the airport and saw the damaged tail of the aircraft in the grass 200 feet past the end of the runway.

“It’s really hard to overrun; usually you need only half the runaway,” Kirsh said. “It would appear something else was going on for that to happen.”

He said the airport is very safe and he could not remember another accident there.

“It’s very well-maintained, top-notch, and I see airport authority officials there all the time inspecting it,” Kirsh said.

The 445-acre airport, surrounded on most sides by suburban development, has a 3,850-foot-long runway. The airport accommodates about 24,000 flights per year, said Stephanie McFarland, spokeswoman for the Indianapolis International Airport, which owns the Fishers airport. About 150 small planes are based there.

McFarland said Metropolitan will be closed pending a National Transportation Safety Board investigation. She declined to provide any further details on the crash.

A final determination on a plane crash can take up to 18 months, NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said. A preliminary report is usually available in a week to 10 days.

The Van’s RV-12 is a two-seat, all-metal plane that reaches a top speed of 135 mph, according to the manufacturer’s website.

http://www.indystar.com/story/news/fox59/2017/08/31/small-plane-crashes-fishers-airport/620491001/?from=global&sessionKey=&autologin=

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Trans-Atlantic holiday jet makes emergency landing in dramatic cloud of spray after suffering hydraulic problems after taking off from Dublin for New York

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 09:50
  • A plane had just taken off from Dublin, Ireland, when the pilot noticed a problem
  • The Aer Lingus flight was heading to New York JFK and had climbed to 5,000ft 
  • Video footage shows the dramatic emergency landing in a cloud of spray

A pilot was forced to make an emergency landing in a dramatic cloud of spray just minutes after taking off from Dublin. 

The Aer Lingus flight to New York JFK had climbed to 5,000ft when the pilot noticed there was an issue with the plane’s hydraulic systems.

Video footage, filmed from inside the airport, shows the A330 approach the runway for landing.

The person who captured it on camera, described the incident as being ‘scary’ because they noticed the plane’s gear doors were extended.

Emergency services rushed to the scene and doused the brakes to cool them down after the plane touched down in Ireland.

Flight data showed the plane made six loops just off the east Irish coast before it headed back towards the airport.

It was in the air for more than one hour before it landed back in Dublin.

The clip was posted online and the eyewitness wrote: ‘It became apparent that there was an issue with the aircraft’s hydraulic systems.

‘The aircraft climbed to roughly 5,000ft and entered a hold to dump fuel while ATC began stacking everyone and getting ready to switch ops on to runway 16 as it was apparent that when the A330 landed it would have no way of exiting the runway.

‘With full emergency crews on standby both airport and local firecrews, the A330 made an approach that was certainly scary to us watching from the terminal, as it had its gear doors extended.

‘This looked slightly unnerving as the aircraft touched down on the runway as the clearance between the runway and the gear doors was minute, after some impressive spray and hard braking the aircraft came to a stop on the runway and was surrounded by emergency services who doused the brakes to cool them and made sure everything was safe.

‘The engines were then shut down and eventually the aircraft was towed off. I would like to congratulate everyone involved from the controllers, to the firecrews to the pilots themselves for handling the situation as they did, a spectacular landing to say the least!’

An Aer Lingus spokesman said: ‘Aer Lingus flight EI 109 travelling from Dublin to New York returned to Dublin on Thursday evening shortly after departure due to a technical issue with the aircraft.

‘The aircraft, with 288 guests and crew on board landed safely at Dublin Airport at 17:40 (local time).

‘Emergency services were in attendance as a precaution. Guests are being accommodated on next available flights to New York.

‘Aer Lingus apologises to guests for the disruption to their travel plans.’

http://video.dailymail.co.uk/video/mol/2017/09/01/2112601451477317915/640x360_MP4_2112601451477317915.mp4

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Those injured on turbulent flight that landed in Calgary weren’t wearing seatbelts: TSB

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 09:47

Failing to heed warnings to buckle up is being blamed for several injuries sustained after an Air Canada jet encountered severe turbulence in 2015, prompting an emergency landing in Calgary.

In a report released Monday by Canada’s Transportation Safety Board, none of the 21 passengers injured on Flight 88 were wearing seatbelts when the Boeing 777-33ER encountered three separate areas of severe turbulence near Anchorage, Alaska — about eight hours into the nearly 14-hour journey from Shanghai to Toronto.

The plane was carrying 332 passengers and 19 crew.

Just before 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 30, 2015, emergency crews were called to Calgary airport to meet the battered Air Canada flight. Fifteen ambulances transported the injured passengers to area hospitals.

Much of the injuries consisted of sprains, scrapes and bruises. One passenger sustained injuries serious enough to require an extended stay in hospital.

None of the injuries was consistent with seatbelt use, the TSB said.

Air Canada dispatch received word about turbulence from other planes and notified Flight 88’s pilots. Cabin crews secured the aircraft and ordered passengers to fasten their seatbelts in English, French and Mandarin — measures praised by the TSB in preventing further injuries.

The 36-page report says the flight encountered three separate periods of prolonged turbulence totalling nearly 20 minutes. Flight data states passengers were subjected to quick successions of negative and positive g-forces more than double the force of Earth’s gravity, flinging unbuckled passengers out of their seats into overhead cabin fixtures — many with enough force to shatter them.

Just before the first encounter, a passenger seated in business class left their seat to use the washroom, disregarding orders to sit down. The passenger was thrown against the ceiling before falling to the floor.

The aircraft also suffered damage, exacerbating existing issues with the plane’s air-handling system. The turbulence even activated the plane’s ‘stick-shaker’ — warning pilots of an imminent stall.

Pilots diverted to Calgary due to the airport’s long runway, as well as the need to remain low and away from the mountains over concerns about a potential loss of cabin pressure due to the damaged air-handling system.

Passengers on the flight described a chaotic scene, with photos of a debris-strewn cabin and dangling oxygen masks appearing on social media.

The report specifically mentions a lack of seatbelt use as a contributing cause of injury.

In a statement to Postmedia, Air Canada said the incident serves as a reminder of the importance to buckle up during fights, even when the seatbelt sign is turned off.

“Most of the passengers who were physically injured were aware that they were required to wear their seatbelts, but chose not to,” the statement read.

“The TSB also noted that airline crews have limited means to compel passengers to comply with instructions to fasten their seatbelt.”

According to the TSB, turbulence is the leading cause of in-flight injuries to passengers and crew members, and often cites lack of seatbelt use as a factor in aircraft injuries.

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/canada/those+injured+turbulent+flight+that+landed+calgary+weren/14468626/story.html

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MAYDAY: TEXAS FIREFIGHTERS IN NEED (THE SECRET LIST)

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 09:45

All-

As per the Texas Fire Marshals Office, many Texas Firefighters and their families have personally suffered major losses in the hurricane and related floods.

It’s estimated in one department alone that 80% of the firefighters have lost their homes. 

Please consider donating whatever you, your fire company, your department, your association or agency is able to do.

100% of these proceeds go directly to a fund that will be used for immediate relief—additional details are below within the link.

How To Assist Texas Fire Departments, Firefighters & Their Families In Need:

http://www.sffma.org/SFFMA_-_Hurricane_Harvey/FloodRelief

Other donation options include:

IAFF: https://tinyurl.com/y8c7j2eh

NVFC: http://www.nvfc.org/nvfc-volunteer-firefighter-support-fund/

Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On.

BillyG

The Secret List 8-30-2017-1624 hours

www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 09:44

34 Years ago today: On 1 September 1983 a Korean Air Lines Boeing 747 was shot down near Sakhalin, Russia, killing 269 people.

Date: Thursday 1 September 1983 Time: 03:26 Type: Boeing 747-230B Operator: Korean Air Lines – KAL Registration: HL7442 C/n / msn: 20559/186 First flight: 1972-03-17 (11 years 6 months) Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT9D-7A Crew: Fatalities: 23 / Occupants: 23 Passengers: Fatalities: 246 / Occupants: 246 Total: Fatalities: 269 / Occupants: 269 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 37 km (23.1 mls) W off Sakhalinsk [Okhotsk Sea] (   Pacific Ocean) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Anchorage International Airport, AK (ANC/PANC), United States of America Destination airport: Seoul-Gimpo (Kimpo) International Airport (SEL/RKSS), South Korea Flightnumber: KE007

Narrative:
Korean Airlines flight KE007, a Boeing 747-230B, arrived at Anchorage, AK (ANC) at 03:30 local time after a flight from New York-JFK< NY (JFK). At 05:00 the aircraft took off again from runway 32, bound for Seoul (SEL). The flight was cleared directly to the Bethel VOR beacon and then on to the Romeo 20 route. However, the aircraft started diverging from it’s intended course and passed 12 miles North of the Bethel beacon. While approaching the Kamchatka peninsula, six Soviet Air Force MiG-23 fighters were scrambled. Because a US Boeing RC-135 intelligence plane was flying in the area east off Kamchatka, the Soviet defence forces probably thought the B747 radar echo to be the RC-135. KAL 007 left Russian airspace over the Okhostk Sea and the fighters returned to their base. Passing abeam the Nippi waypoint (4 hours after takeoff), the aircraft was 185 miles off course and headed for Sakhalin. Two Soviet Sukhoi Su-15 fighters were scrambled from the Dolinsk-Sokol airbase at 17:42 UTC and 17:54 respectively. At 18:16 UTC flight 007 re-entered Soviet airspace. At 18:22 the Soviet command ordered destruction of the target (for the second time). Two air-to-air missiles were launched by one of the fighters and struck the Boeing at 18:26 (August 31, 03:26 local time September 1). Cabin pressure was lost and the aircraft suffered control problems, causing the Boeing to spiral down and crash into the sea.

The post Today in History appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Today is Thursday the 31st of August, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 08:34

We close out this month with the following stories…

Of note, the first story! Chief Billy Goldfeder (The Secret List) has posted several ways for us to provide some assistance to our Brothers and Sisters affected by the devastating floods in Texas. Please take a look at the information and if you can, do something to help!

Be safe out there!

Tom

The post Today is Thursday the 31st of August, 2017 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

MAYDAY: Texas Firefighters In Need (The Secret List)

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 08:27

All-

As per the Texas Fire Marshals Office, many Texas Firefighters and their families have personally suffered major losses in the hurricane and related floods.

It’s estimated in one department alone that 80% of the firefighters have lost their homes. 

Please consider donating whatever you, your fire company, your department, your association or agency is able to do.

100% of these proceeds go directly to a fund that will be used for immediate relief—additional details are below within the link.

How To Assist Texas Fire Departments, Firefighters & Their Families In Need:

http://www.sffma.org/SFFMA_-_Hurricane_Harvey/FloodRelief

Other donation options include:

IAFF: https://tinyurl.com/y8c7j2eh

NVFC: http://www.nvfc.org/nvfc-volunteer-firefighter-support-fund/

Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On.

BillyG

The Secret List 8-30-2017-1624 hours

www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

The post MAYDAY: Texas Firefighters In Need (The Secret List) appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Atatürk Havalianı’nı facian’ın on the brink of return!

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 08:26

The passenger plane belonging to Uzbekistan Airlines survived a great danger during landing. In the case of the living, it was almost turned from the threshold of the facian. Here are the details … 

The passenger plane of Uzbekistan Airlines’ Tashkent-Istanbul expedition landed at Ataturk Airport at 09:30 am. During the landing, a piece of airplane was severely damaged at the wing where the fuel tanks were located.

According to the information given by AirportHaber; The flight B767-300ER, which carried flight number HY271, tore off the estimated piece of landing gear that landed on the landing gear, causing the tires to rupture as well. Against the possibility of fuel leaks ARFF teams at Ataturk Airport were also awaited around the aircraft.

It was learned that there were no injuries due to the incident and that the necessary reports were kept immediately after the accident and the technical examination was started. Authorities said the plane would be taken care of.

http://www.airporthaber.com/havacilik-haberleri/ataturk-havalianinda-facianin-esiginden-donuldu.html

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NTSB: Loss of control, poor visibility caused fatal plane

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 08:24

The Associated Press

BLOOMINGTON, ILL.

The National Transportation Safety Board is blaming loss of control by the pilot and poor visibility for the April 2015 crash of a private plane in central Illinois that killed seven.

In the report released Wednesday, the NTSB says the pilot’s failure to maintain control resulted in the airplane “exceeding its critical angle of attack,” resulting in a stall. The agency determined that pilot fatigue, an unexplained disconnected cable and unbalanced cargo that dragged the plane down toward its tail also contributed to the crash.

The Cessna 414A was approaching Central Illinois Regional Airport near Bloomington when it took a turn east, climbed and then descended, crashing into a field. The plane was returning to Bloomington from the NCAA Tournament in Indianapolis.

The Pantagraph in Bloomington reports the NTSB investigation found “no evidence of (sleep loss) or medical conditions that indicated poor sleep quality for the pilot, Tom Hileman.

However, the agency says that, at the time of crash, the pilot’s extended hours of continuous wakefulness likely led to fatigue.

“The accident occurred more than 2 hours after (Hileman) routinely went to sleep, which suggests that the pilot’s circadian system would not have been promoting alertness,” according to the report. “The pilot likely had been awake for 18 hours.”

The glideslope antenna cable, which relays data that helps the pilot track the plane’s balance, was likely inadequately connected or secured during the flight, making the data unavailable.

In addition to Hileman, the victims of the crash included Illinois State University associate basketball coach Torrey Ward and administrator Aaron Leetch.

The men had close ties to ISU athletics, and a memorial to them now stands near Redbird Arena in Normal.

http://www.bnd.com/news/state/illinois/article170374087.html

The post NTSB: Loss of control, poor visibility caused fatal plane appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Richard Tetrev meets with Public Safety Advisory Council: Wiscasset Municipal Airport (KIWI), Lincoln County, Maine

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 08:17

Richard Tetrev will be Wiscasset Municipal Airport’s interim airport manager the rest of the season, following Frank Costa’s resignation effective Sept. 5, Wiscasset Administrative Assistant Kathy Onorato said Wednesday.

Tetrev, who has served as airport supervisor since 2015, appeared before the Public Safety Advisory Council on Aug. 29. Tetrev oversaw Brunswick Naval Air Station prior to its closure.

Since BNAS stopped being a federal facility, the airport no longer maintains crash trucks – fire engines that spread a foam fire retardant called AFFF. Instead, the town of Brunswick has dual use fire trucks that can be used to spread AFFF. The Wiscasset airport had relied on the BNAS crash trucks in case of a crash or aircraft fire, but now the airport is left without this critical safety measure, Tetrev said. That will make getting grants to improve the airport more difficult, he said.

When BNAS stopped using its crash trucks, there was some AFFF left over, but no one can figure out what happened to it, he said. The best guess is that it is in the possession of the Maine Forest Service for putting out wildfires. Both the Wiscasset Ambulance Service and the airport are in touch with the agency. If Wiscasset can get some, it could be applied with five-gallon buckets until a vehicle can be obtained and firefighters trained on how to use it.

The plan for the immediate future is to create a staging area at the airport in case of a natural disaster or mass casualty event, Police Chief Jeff Lange said.  Tetrev wants to do a drill at the airport within the next year, with a simulated plane crash, tabletop exercises, and other drills in case of a crash in the future as the airport begins accepting larger planes, especially jets.

Read more here
 http://www.wiscassetnewspaper.com

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 08:15

31 Years ago today: On 31 August 1986 an Aeromexico DC-9 collided with a Piper 28 over Cerritos, CA, USA and crashed, killing 82 people.

Date: Sunday 31 August 1986 Time: 11:52 Type: McDonnell Douglas DC-9-32 Operator: Aeroméxico Registration: XA-JED C/n / msn: 47356/470 First flight: 1969 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7 Crew: Fatalities: 6 / Occupants: 6 Passengers: Fatalities: 58 / Occupants: 58 Total: Fatalities: 64 / Occupants: 64 Ground casualties: Fatalities: 15 Collision casualties: Fatalities: 3 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Cerritos, CA (   United States of America) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Tijuana-Rodriguez Airport (TIJ/MMTJ), Mexico Destination airport: Los Angeles International Airport, CA (LAX/KLAX), United States of America Flightnumber: AM498

Narrative:
Aéromexico flight 498 was a scheduled passenger flight from Mexico City to Los Angeles with intermediate stops at Guadalajara, Loreto and Tijuana. The DC-9, named “Hermosillo”, departed Tijuana Airport at 11:20 and proceeded toward Los Angeles at FL100. At 11:44 Coast Approach Control cleared the flight to 7000 feet. Just three minutes earlier Piper PA-28-181 Cherokee N4891F departed Torrance Airport, CA for a VFR flight to Big Bear, CA. On board were a pilot and two passengers.
The Piper pilot turned to an easterly heading toward the Paradise VORTAC and entered the Terminal Control Area (TCA) without receiving clearance from ATC as required by FAR Part 91.90. At 11:47 the Aéromexico pilot contacted LA Approach Control and reported level at 7000 feet. The approach controller cleared flight 498 to depart Seal Beach on a heading of 320 degrees for the ILS runway “two five left final approach course…”. At 11:51:04, the approach controller asked the flight to reduce its airspeed to 190 KIAS and cleared it to descend to 6000 feet. At about 11:52:09, flight 498 and the Piper collided over Cerritos at an altitude of about 6560 feet. The Piper struck the left hand side of the DC-9’s horizontal and vertical stabilizer. The horizontal stabilizer sliced through the Piper’s cabin following which it separated from the tailplane. Both planes tumbled down out of control. The wreckage and post impact fires destroyed five houses and damaged seven others. Fifteen persons on the ground were killed. The sky was clear, the reported visibility was 14 miles.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The limitations of the ATC system to provide collision protection, through both ATC procedures and automated redundancy. Factors contributing to the accident were (1) the inadvertent and unauthorized entry of the PA-28 into the Los Angeles Terminal Control Area and (2) the limitations of the “see and avoid” concept to ensure traffic separation under the conditions of the conflict.”

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Today is Wednesday the 30th of August, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 09:20

Here are the stories for today..

Of note, check out the video in the last story of a CL-415 water bomber whacking the mast on a barge in France. Some lucky folks there, both on the barge and in the aircraft…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Cargo plane crash-lands in Maban, crew members survive

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 09:16

An Antonov 26B cargo plane was damaged in a runway excursion and post impact fire after landing at Maban airstrip in Northern Upper Nile on Monday, a senior aviation official said.

The General Manager of Juba International Airport, Kur Kuol told Radio Tamazuj today that the aircraft was carrying supplies on behalf of UNHCR to Maban.

He further said the plane failed to stop on runway was a result of bad weather condition, and overran. He further said investigations are underway. “No casualties were reported because it was a cargo plane. We are still waiting for the pilot to come to give us more details about the incident,” he said.

Last week, a 5-year-old girl was killed and four people injured in Juba when a WFP-contracted aircraft struck a house while attempting to land during a thunderstorm.

https://radiotamazuj.org/en/news/article/cargo-plane-crash-lands-in-maban-crew-members-survive

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