ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Vehicle fire at Atlanta airport sends up plume of smoke, snarls traffic

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 12/31/2018 - 07:00

CLAYTON COUNTY, Ga. – A vehicle fire at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport sent a plume of thick black smoke over the north terminal canopy Saturday afternoon.

Photos sent to Channel 2 Action News showed a burned-out white truck or SUV. Video shows the vehicle heavily engulfed in flames.

It appeared firefighters had gotten the blaze under control by around 4:30 p.m. The airport’s official Twitter account said the issue was resolved.

No one was injured and it is unclear how the fire started. Traffic was backed up around the airport.

https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/car-fire-sends-plume-of-smoke-up-over-atlanta-airport/896075638?fbclid=IwAR1qhYmqlLYTozF9iFwY9dDVTHVMx9M-L_XzFzM146NKMMjR-6DJ3jyn384

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Today is Friday the 28th of December, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 12/28/2018 - 07:34

Here are the stories to close out this last full week of 2018.

On a personal note, our heartfelt condolences go out to my friend Bill Stewart, past Chairman of the ARFF Working Group, and his entire family. Bill’s dad, Paul, passed away yesterday. Please keep them in your thoughts and prayers…

Have a good weekend, be safe out there!

Tom

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Aircrafts take a detour to Willard Airport after emergency landing

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 12/28/2018 - 07:30

by Haydee Clotter

SAVOY, Ill. (WICS/WCCU) — Inbound jet engine failure is the call that came in around 9:30 Wednesday morning.

Within an hour, a second call came in.

Two different emergency landings at the University of Illinois Willard Airport is unusual.

Airport staff said emergency landings like this don’t happen often at a small airport like Willard and it’s more common at larger airports because of outgoing and incoming traffic.

The small jets can handle about four to eight passengers and both were headed south.

Airport staff said the pilot made an announcement to passengers that there was an engine issue and the plane will land at the nearest airport, so buckle up.

“Both aircrafts landed with no problems and they’re having mechanics look at the issues to see what the issues are and always it’s an abundance of caution that they go ahead and declare an emergency and land, because they get a warning in the cockpit and they don’t really know what that warning means,” said University of Illinois Willard Airport Executive Director Gene Cossey. “So they go ahead and take it as serious as possible.”

Cossey said anything like a drop in oil pressure, a voltage regulator light going off or fuel interruption indicator could trigger an emergency landing.

Flightstar mechanics will check the engine and make necessary repairs, re-certify the aircrafts for flight and the airline puts them back in service.

Flightstar mechanics said the cause of the emergency landing stays in-house and they wouldn’t release specifics.

Willard Airport receives these type of calls maybe three or four times a month, according to Cossey.

These were private aircrafts, so owners found other means of transportation and continued their trip.

https://foxillinois.com/news/local/aircrafts-take-a-detour-to-willard-airport-after-emergency-landing?fbclid=IwAR36Q0Amk2sqRNiiNSqENYHtK8IVNh8oX83JEVf86WNi6ZYe_eL1swH6FC0

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Plane slides off runway at Sugar Land airport

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 12/28/2018 - 07:28

By Jay R. Jordan

No one was hurt when a plane slid off the runway Thursday at Sugar Land Regional Airport.

A pilot had just landed his Cessna 182 around 1:30 p.m. when the plane slid off the runway, striking a sign, according to city spokesperson Doug Adolph.

He was able to walk out of the plane unscathed and refused medical attention, Adolph said.

Aerial shots from KPRC-TV shows the plane sustained minor damage.

Adolph said the airport’s operations were never affected by the incident.

https://www.chron.com/neighborhood/sugarland/news/article/Plane-slides-off-runway-at-Sugar-Land-airport-13493874.php

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Autoland Runway Excursion Blamed On Pilots

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 12/28/2018 - 07:24

By Russ Niles

German investigators say a runway excursion by Boeing 777 that was on autoland was the fault of the pilots. The unusual incident happened in November of 2011 at Munich Airport but the report from the German BRU was just released this week. The BRU found the Singapore Airlines crew initiated the chain of events that led to the autopilot putting the aircraft on the grass. It was reported by Aerossurance on Monday. The flight was arriving from Manchester in the U.K. and was just about to touch down when an RJ85 taking off farther down the runway momentarily blocked the signal from the localizer at the opposite end. For a few seconds, nothing and no one was in control of the aircraft, which was less than 50 feet above the runway.

The widebody banked left before landing on the left main gear and veering left off the runway, even though the captain hit the go-around button on the throttle lever. The pilots were only able to gain manual control when they kicked right rudder, sending the big jet back across the runway where it finally stopped in the grass on the right side. There were no injuries and the plane wasn’t damaged. The investigation concluded the aircraft performed as designed and blamed the pilots.

The crew’s mistake occurred when they got their final weather report for the destination airport. As per their company’s procedures, the captain took over from the first officer as pilot flying because of the low visibility (1.25 NM) and ceiling (300 feet). Even though the conditions didn’t require it (they were CAT I), the captain decided to let the plane autoland but he didn’t tell controllers. The controllers were operating under CAT I procedures, which allowed them to clear the regional for takeoff ahead of the approaching 777. Had the controllers known the 777 was autolanding, the investigators said the controllers would have held the RJ85.

The timing of the events proved critical to the eventual outcome. The localizer signal was interrupted just as the 777 was about to touch down. When it banked left, the captain hit the automatic go around but not before the gear touched and caused the aircraft to reject that command. It instead went into the roll-out mode. The pilots were, however, able to manually retract the spoilers in anticipation of the go around and that likely contributed to their wild ride on the ground. The BRU recommended that flight crews be brushed up on the regs and do more sim training for localizer deviations. The mishap was caught on video.

https://youtu.be/0rn-iI7wX-Y

https://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/101/4221-full.html?ET=avweb:e4221:302476a:&st=email#232050

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A Little Old Time Fire “Radio” Gift (The Secret List)

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 12/28/2018 - 07:21

Hey,

In the 1940’s and early 1950, there was a very popular “gather ’round the radio with your family” program called “Firefighters”

The Firefighters radio program had a total of 140 fifteen-minute episodes that aired on early primetime WCPO radio during the late 1940’s and ended in 1950.

As you will soon hear, it was a first class radio production heard across the country that was syndicated in over 225 markets in the United States and Canada… and it outranked national network radio shows like Lone Ranger and Sky King in its region.

“Firefighters” dramatized actual case histories of real Fire Departments. It is authentic in every detail, from Fire Department “welcoming” of new members to the ranks, to responses to the “latest” firefighting techniques and equipment.

During its run, the “Firefighters” show followed the heroic adventures of the rookie Firefighter, Tim Collins, who completed firefighter training after returning from World War II. Each episode focused on a particular fire emergency that Tim and his fellow firefighters had to face. At the end of each episode the character, Fire Chief Bob Cody spoke to listeners directly about fire safety.

Thanks to the Cincinnati Fire Museum (a beautiful museum well worth a visit) here is a link to all 140 of the 15 minute episodes, all for your listening enjoyment.

https://www.cincyfiremuseum.com/the-radio-program/

Enjoy!
Take Care. Be Careful. Pass it On.

BillyG

The Secret List 12/27.2018-2000 Hours

www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 12/28/2018 - 07:19

4 Years ago today: On 28 December 2014 an Indonesia AirAsia Airbus A320 crashed in the Karimata Strait, Indonesia, killing all 162 occupants.

Date: Sunday 28 December 2014 Time: 06:18 Type: Airbus A320-216 Operator: Indonesia AirAsia Registration: PK-AXC C/n / msn: 3648 First flight: 2008-09-25 (6 years 3 months) Total airframe hrs: 23039 Cycles: 13610 Engines:CFMI CFM56-5B6/3 Crew: Fatalities: 6 / Occupants: 6 Passengers: Fatalities: 156 / Occupants: 156 Total: Fatalities: 162 / Occupants: 162 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Karimata Strait (   Indonesia) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Surabaya-Juanda Airport (SUB/WARR), Indonesia Destination airport: Singapore-Changi International Airport (SIN/WSSS), Singapore Flightnumber: QZ8501

Narrative:
An Indonesia AirAsia Airbus A320-216, performing flight QZ8501, was destroyed when it impacted the water of the Java Sea between Surabaya and Singapore. All 156 passengers and six crew members on board were killed.
The flight took off from runway 10 at Surabaya-Juanda Airport (SUB) at 05:35 hours local time (22:35 UTC). The airplane turned left, tracking 329° over the Java Sea. The planned cruising altitude of FL320 was reached about 05:49. At 06:00 the Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitoring (ECAM) amber advisory AUTO FLT RUD TRV LIM 1 appeared. One minute later a failure on both Rudder Travel Limiter Units triggered a chime and master caution light. The ECAM message showed “AUTO FLT RUD TRV LIM SYS” (Auto Flight Rudder Travel Limiter System). The pilot in command read and performed the ECAM action to set the Flight Augmentation Computer (FAC) 1 and 2 push-buttons on the overhead panel to OFF then to ON one by one. Both Rudder Travel Limiter Units returned to function normally.
Upon entering the Jakarta Flight Information Region (FIR) over the TAVIP waypoint at 06:11 the flight contacted Jakarta ACC. The flight stated that they were deviating to the left of their planned route along airway M635 to avoid clouds and requested a climb to FL380. The requested climb was not possible due to other traffic but the flight was cleared to climb to FL340.
At 06:13, a single chime sounded and the amber ECAM message “AUTO FLT RUD TRV LIM SYS” was again displayed. This was the third failure on both Rudder Travel Limiter Units on this flight. The pilots performed the ECAM actions and the system returned to function normally.
At 06:15, the fourth failure on both Rudder Travel Limiter Units occurred and triggered ECAM message “AUTO FLT RUD TRV LIM SYS”, chime and master caution light.
At 06:16 the flight was cleared by Jakarta Radar to climb to FL340 but there was no reply. The Jakarta Radar controller then called the pilot for several times but received no reply.
Meanwhile on the flight deck, the pilot in command decided not to follow the same ECAM actions as before to rectify the failure. He had recently observed a ground engineer resetting the FAC Circuit Breakers (CB) to rectify the rudder travel limiter failure and assumed he could use the same method in flight. This action however was not allowed in flight. The consequences of resetting FAC CBs in flight are not described in Airbus documents. It requires good understanding of the aircraft system to be aware of the consequences.
Following a reset of the circuit breakers, several master cautions were triggered in relation to FAC’s 1 and 2.
After electrical interruption the autopilot and the auto-thrust then disengaged. Flight control law reverted from Normal Law to Alternate Law. The aircraft started to roll to the left up to 54° angle of bank. Nine seconds after the autopilot disengaged, the right side-stick activated. The delayed response of the pilot flying was likely due to his attention not being directed to the PFD as many events occurred at this time. He may have been startled when he realized the unusual attitude of the aircraft.
After the right side-stick activated, the aircraft roll angle reduced to 9° left. This rapid right rolling movement might cause an excessive roll sensation to the right. The pilot flying may have experienced spatial disorientation and over-corrected by shifting the side stick to the left which caused the aircraft rolled back to the left up to 50°
The input on his side-stick was mostly pitch up and the aircraft climbed up to approximately 38,000 feet with a climb rate of up to 11,000 feet per minute.
The aircraft pitch reached 24° up. The pilot in command then stated: “pull down…pull down” however the input on the pilot flying’s side stick was backward and increased resulting in the AOA increasing up to a maximum of 48° up.
At 06:17:17 the stall warning activated and continued until the end of the CVR recording.
In a response the pilot in command applied nose down commands with his side stick while the pilot flying’s side stick input was mostly at maximum pitch up until the end of the recording
At 06:17:41 the aircraft reached the highest altitude of 38,500 feet and the largest roll angle of 104° to the left. The aircraft then lost altitude with a descent rate of up to 20,000 feet per minute.
At approximately 29,000 feet the aircraft attitude was wings level with pitch and roll angles of approximately zero with the airspeed varied between 100 and 160 knots. The Angle of Attack (AOA) was almost constant at approximately 40° up. The aircraft then lost altitude with an average rate of 12,000 feet per minute until the aircraft impacted the sea.

On December 30 pieces of debris and bodies were recovered from the sea. On January 12 and 13, 2015 the Flight Data Recorder (FDR) and Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) were retrieved. On January 14 the main fuselage was located by a Singapore Navy ship

Probable Cause:

Contributing factors:
– The cracking of a solder joint of both channel A and B resulted in loss of electrical continuity and led to RTLU failure.
– The existing maintenance data analysis led to unresolved repetitive faults occurring with shorter intervals. The same fault occurred 4 times during the flight.
– The flight crew action to the first 3 faults in accordance with the ECAM messages. Following the fourth fault, the FDR recorded different signatures that were similar to the FAC CB’s being reset resulting in electrical interruption to the FAC’s.
– The electrical interruption to the FAC caused the autopilot to disengage and the flight control logic to change from Normal Law to Alternate Law, the rudder deflecting 2° to the left resulting the aircraft rolling up to 54° angle of bank.
– Subsequent flight crew action leading to inability to control the aircraft in the
– Alternate Law resulted in the aircraft departing from the normal flight envelope and entering prolonged stall condition that was beyond the capability of the flight crew to recover.

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Fire College Employees Sue AFFF Manufacturers For $35 Million

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 12/27/2018 - 08:27

Posted by: Curt Varone

Six former employees of the Florida State Fire College in Ocala who developed thyroid diseases and/or various cancers have filed a class action lawsuit against ten parties they claim were responsible for exposing them to toxic chemicals contained in aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF). David Battisti, Regina Saueracker, Mary Ann Benson, Susan Schell, Carol Smith, and Anita Pringle filed the action last week in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida.

The suit claims the defendants were responsible for bringing AFFF to the college, and that two toxic components of the foam, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), caused their illnesses. The ten defendants are:

  1. 3M Company,
  2. Tyco Fire Products, L.P.
  3. Buckeye Fire Equipment Company
  4. Chemguard, Inc.
  5. National Foam, Inc.
  6. Kidde Fire Fighting, Inc.
  7. Williams Holdings, Inc.
  8. John F. Hannon was the CEO and Secretary of Williams Holdings, Inc.
  9. Kidde-Fenwal, Inc.
  10. UTC Fire & Security Americas Corporation, Inc.

As explained in the complaint:

  • PFOS and PFOA are highly toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. The Defendants knew or should have known that PFOS and PFOA are persistent when released into the environment and present significant risks to human health and the environment.
  • Nevertheless, the Defendants knowingly and willfully manufactured, designed, marketed, sold, and distributed AFFF products containing PFOS and/or PFOA when they knew or reasonably should have known that these harmful compounds would be released into the air, soil, and groundwater during firefighting training exercises and in firefighting emergencies, and would threaten the health and welfare of firefighters and other individuals exposed to these dangerous and hazardous chemicals.
  • Defendants’ PFOS- and/or PFOA- containing AFFF products were used by Plaintiffs, and others at the Fire College, in their intended manner, without significant change in the products’ condition. Being unaware of the dangerous properties of the Defendants’ AFFF products, Plaintiffs relied on Defendants’ instructions as to proper methods of handling the products. Plaintiffs’ consumption, inhalation or dermal absorption of PFOS and/or PFOA from Defendants’ AFFF products caused Plaintiffs to develop numerous serious medical conditions, including, but not limited to, thyroid disease, kidney cancer and/or end-stage kidney disease, ulcerative colitis, and hypercholesterolemia.
  • [The plaintiffs were] exposed to significantly elevated levels of PFOS and PFOA in their concentrated form as a result of regular contact with the Defendants’ AFFF products and through PFOS and PFOA having contaminated the wells at the Fire College, including, but not limited to, through the accumulation of PFOS and PFOA in the pipes, faucets, showerheads, appliances, sinks, and drinking water fountains.
  • Plaintiff David Battisti has suffered from thyroid disease as a direct and proximate result of his exposure to PFOA and PFOS and is at an increased risk of developing several health effects, including but not limited to effects on the liver and immune system, kidney cancer, testicular cancer, high cholesterol, colitis, and autoimmune diseases.
  • Plaintiff Regina Saueracker has suffered from thyroid disease, kidney disease, including bilateral renal masses, and ulcerative colitis as a direct result of her exposure to PFOS and PFOA. She is at an increased risk of developing several health effects, including but not limited to effects on the liver and immune system, kidney cancer, breast cancer, high cholesterol, and autoimmune diseases.
  • Plaintiff Mary Ann Benson has suffered from thyroid disease and breast cancer as a direct result of her exposure to PFOS and PFOA and is at an increased risk of developing several health effects, including but not limited to effects on the liver and immune system, kidney cancer, testicular cancer, high cholesterol, colitis, and autoimmune diseases.
  • Plaintiff Susan Schell has suffered from end-stage kidney disease as a direct result of her exposure to PFOS and PFOA and is at an increased risk of developing several health effects, including but not limited to effects on the liver and immune system, kidney cancer, breast cancer, high cholesterol, colitis, and autoimmune diseases.
  • Plaintiff Carol Smith has suffered from thyroid disease as a direct result of her exposure to PFOS and PFOA and is at an increased risk of developing several health effects, including but not limited to effects on the liver and immune system, kidney cancer, testicular cancer, high cholesterol, colitis, and autoimmune diseases.
  • Plaintiff Anita Pringle has suffered from thyroid disease and parathyroid cancer as a direct result of her exposure to PFOA and PFOS and is at an increased risk of developing several health effects, including but not limited to effects on the liver and immune system, kidney cancer, breast cancer, high cholesterol, colitis, and autoimmune diseases.

The suit alleges negligence, gross negligence, and strict liability, and seeking over $35 Million in damages, including over $5 million for medical monitoring and over $5 million in punitive damages. The spouses of Carol Smith and Anita Pringle joined in the suit seeking damages for a loss of consortium.

The suit seeks the creation of a class of plaintiffs consisting of “firefighter instructors, trainees, staff members, and other individuals who worked and/or trained at the Florida State Fire College located at 11655 NW Gainesville Road, Ocala, Florida 34482.”

Here is a copy of the complaint: Battisti v 3M Company

Fire College Employees Sue AFFF Manufacturers For $35 Million

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PIA plane collides with airstair at Islamabad airport

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 12/27/2018 - 08:24

by Nozair Hanif Mirza

A passenger plane of Pakistan International Airline (PIA) was severely damaged after it collided with a passenger airstair while departing for Karachi at Islamabad International Airport.

The national flag carrier’s flight PK-373 was set to depart for Karachi when the aircraft collided with passenger stairs while leaving the airport apron, damaging the wing of the aircraft.

Fortunately, all staff and passenger remained safe in the mishap and have been shifted back to the passenger lounge.

According to PIA officials, the wing of the Airbus A320 aircraft is being currently repaired and a probe has been launched into the matter.

Last month, an ATR aircraft of PIA was severely damaged after it collided with a parked aircraft, owned by Shaheen Airlines, at the Jinnah International Airport, Karachi.

The PIA jet’s fuel tank and engine were damaged in the accident and emergency was declared at the airport as the oil started spilling out of the tank. The firefighters surrounded the aircraft to deal with any severe situation.

https://en.dailypakistan.com.pk/pakistan/pakistan-us-armies-back-afghan-solution-through-political-resolution/

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Fire caused by lithium batteries: It’s high time to manage risks

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 12/27/2018 - 08:23

By Pratap John

In 2011, there was a crash of a South Korean airline Asiana B747F following a fire in the cargo compartment. The aircraft was carrying a large automotive lithium ion battery, loaded next to a large quantity of flammable liquid.

The scheduled cargo flight from Incheon International Airport, Incheon, South Korea, to Shanghai Pudong International Airport in China, crashed into the international waters about 130km west of Jeju International Airport after the flight crew reported a cargo fire and attempted to divert to Jeju International Airport.

Aboard the aircraft were two pilots, both fatally injured, and the aircraft was destroyed.

Immediately after the accident, search and rescue operations have been initiated, and about two hours after the accident, the South Korean Coast Guard recovered some floating debris and wreckage at the accident site.

The Aviation and Railway Accident Investigation Board (ARAIB) determined the probable cause of this accident as follows: a fire developed on or near the pallets containing dangerous goods but no physical evidence of the cause of the fire was found.

The fire rapidly escalated into a large uncontained fire, and this caused some portions of the fuselage to separate from the aircraft in midair, thereby resulting in the crash.

Preliminary findings by South Korea’s Aircraft and Railway Accident Investigation Board showed the aircraft was 50 minutes into its flight and had just been transferred to Shanghai area control centre when it made the emergency call.

A year earlier than this incident – in September 2010, the crew of a cargo plane reported radio problems and smoke in the cockpit of the B747-400 freighter shortly before the crash in an unpopulated area near Dubai.

The cause was not known at the time, but is now known to have been due to a fire caused by lithium batteries.

Investigators say the crash highlights the risks posed by lithium batteries, which are prone to overheating leading to intense fires.

A 2013 blaze on a parked Boeing 787 Dreamliner owned by Ethiopian at London’s Heathrow prompted investigators to call for a safety review of all lithium battery-powered equipment on planes.

The blaze burned through the fuselage and filled the cabin Ethiopian Airlines jet with acrid smoke while the plane was parked at a remote stand on the runway.

Since the Heathrow incident, Boeing has added a specific section on fighting lithium battery fires to its flight attendant manual.

According to the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) (as of January 24, 2018) there were as many as 191 air/airport incidents involving lithium batteries carried as cargo or baggage that have been recorded since March 20, 1991.

Most of these incidents included smoke, fire, extreme heat or explosion involving lithium batteries or unknown battery types. Incidents have included devices such as E-cigarettes, laptops, cell phones, and tablets. The severity of these incidents ranged from minor injuries to emergency landings.

The accident investigation report in the Asiana airline crash recommended that airlines not load flammable liquids in close proximity to lithium batteries.

The IATA Dangerous Goods Board believes this “should be expanded to include all flammable dangerous goods and to explosives.” This was proposed to the Dangerous Goods Panel, which adopted requirements for packages and overpacks containing lithium batteries to be segregated from packages and overpacks containing explosives, flammable gases, flammable liquids and flammable solids when loaded into an aircraft unit load device and when loaded into the aircraft cargo compartment.

This was adopted to reduce the risk should there be a fire in the cargo compartment so that the flammable dangerous goods don’t contribute to intensity of any fire that may engulf the lithium batteries.

Shippers of lithium cells, batteries and equipment containing lithium cells and batteries when they offer these for transport must sign the completed Shipper’s Declaration, said Dave Brennan, IATA assistant director (Cargo Safety Standards).

“In signing the ‘Shipper’s Declaration’, the shipper is declaring that what they are offering complies with all relevant parts of the regulations,” Brennan points out.

Even as regulators and safety experts are working on tackling the issue, a few precautions can help prevent such incidents. While lithium batteries are becoming more and more prevalent in our society, so are the risks involved. The above mishaps highlight dangers posed by lithium batteries on flights.

Safety experts therefore urge passengers not to travel with a device with a damaged or defective battery.

They must make sure battery is properly installed in their devices.

Batteries properly installed in devices pose less of a fire risk as long as they are recharged properly.

If a passenger is travelling with a spare battery, he must take care to protect them from damage and short circuiting. This can be accomplished by placing the spare batteries in their original retail packaging; placing tape over the terminals of the battery to insulate them or place each battery in a separate plastic or protective pouch.

Unless something is done to prevent similar disasters due to fire in cargo hold caused by lithium batteries, the FAA says such crashes are all but inevitable in future!

https://www.gulf-times.com/story/617588/Fire-caused-by-lithium-batteries-It-s-high-time-to

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 12/27/2018 - 08:20

27 Years ago today: On 27 December 1991 a SAS MD-81 made a forced landing in a field following a double engine flame-out after takeoff from Stockholm, Sweden; all 129 occupants survived.

Date: Friday 27 December 1991 Time: 08:51 Type: McDonnell Douglas DC-9-81 (MD-81) Operator: Scandinavian Airlines System – SAS Registration: OY-KHO C/n / msn: 53003/1844 First flight: 1991 Total airframe hrs: 1608 Cycles: 1272 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-217C Crew: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 122 Total: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 129 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: near Gottröra (   Sweden) Phase: Initial climb (ICL) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Stockholm-Arlanda Airport (ARN/ESSA), Sweden Destination airport: København-Kastrup Airport (CPH/EKCH), Denmark Flightnumber: SK751

Narrative:
The MD-81 arrived from Zurich at 22:09 and was parked at gate 2 overnight with temperatures of around +1 deg. C. Approx. 2550 kg of fuel remained in each wing tank. The aircraft was scheduled to leave Stockholm for Copenhagen at 08:30 and the temperature had dropped to -0 deg C in the early morning. During the night and in the early morning clear ice had formed on the upper side of the wings, but this was not detected by the ground crew member who checked the forward part of the wing. The aircraft was fuelled with 1400 kg of fuel and was ready for de-icing at 08:30, which was done using 850l of Type I fluid. After de-icing the mechanic didn’t check whether there was any clear ice on the upper side of the wings, since he had previously found none. The flight was then cleared to taxi to runway 08 and the aircraft took off at 08:47. After 25 seconds (at 1124 feet height) bangs, vibrations and jerks were perceived in the aircraft. This was caused by a no. 2 engine surge. The engine was throttled down a little, but throttle control simultaneously changed to an automatic mode which increased throttle setting with altitude (Automatic Thrust Restoration – ATR). This in turn increased the intensity of the surging. The no. 1 engine surged 39 seconds later, but this was not noticed by the flight crew. An attempt to switch on the autopilot at 2616 feet failed. At 76 resp. 78 seconds into the flight both the no. 2 and no. 1 engine failed after breakup of the stage 1 stators of both engines (initiated by high loads from the surges). The aircraft was climbing through 3206 feet at that moment with a 196 KIAS. A no. 1 engine fire warning at 91 seconds into the flight made the crew activate the fire extinguishing system. A SAS captain traveling the passenger cabin realized that there were problems and hurried to the cockpit to assist the flight crew. The aircraft was in a gliding left turn at that moment. When descending through 420 m, still in the clouds, the assisting captain gradually extended the flaps. The flaps were fully extended at 1100 feet (340 m) and the plane broke through the clouds at 980-820 feet. A field in the direction of flight was chosen for an emergency landing. The wheels were selected down and Stockholm control was informed about the imminent crash-landing. The MD-81 contacted trees at 121 knots and a major portion of the right wing broke off. The plane then struck sloping ground tail-first and slid along the ground for 110 m. The fuselage was broken into three pieces, but there was no fire

Probable Cause:

CAUSES OF THE ACCIDENT: “The accident was caused by SAS’ instructions and routines being inadequate to ensure that clear ice was removed from the wings of the aircraft prior to takeoff. Hence the aircraft took off with clear ice on the wings. In connection with lift-off, the clear ice loosened and was ingested by the engines. The ice caused damage to the engine fan stages, which led to engine surges. The surges destroyed the engines.
Contributory causes were: The pilots were not trained to identify and eliminate engine surging; ATR-which was unknown within SAS – was activated and increased the engine power without the pilot’s knowledge.”

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Today is Wednesday the 26th of December, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 12/26/2018 - 08:52

I hope you all had a very Merry Christmas yesterday, and are are now starting to focus on next week’s New Year’s celebrations!

Be safe out there!

Tom

The post Today is Wednesday the 26th of December, 2018 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

At least one dead after plane crashes into Sioux Falls neighborhood Christmas evening

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 12/26/2018 - 08:49

Joe Sneve, Makenzie L Huber and Megan Raposa, Sioux Falls Argus Leader

At least one person is dead after an airplane crashed into a residential neighborhood in Sioux Falls early Tuesday evening.

Reports came into Metro Communications shortly after 5 p.m. that a plane had crashed into a residential neighborhood in the 4200 block of south Birchwood Avenue, causing multiple homes to catch fire. 

Regan Smith, Sioux Falls Emergency Manager, confirmed at least one person succumbed to injuries sustained in the incident, believed to be the pilot of the small frame, small engine aircraft, and there could be more fatalities.

“We’re still investigating, and there may be more fatalities,” he said during a 7 p.m. briefing with media on scene.

Two homes sustained exterior damage from the crash, Smith said, and four homes were evacuated while fire and emergency crews work to stabilize the scene.

“We’re working this through the evening as far as continuing the search and seeing what’s going on in the neighborhood and making sure that everything is OK,” Smith said.

Smith said the plane was southbound when it crashed into the residential neighborhood, leaving a “large debris field associated with the scene” in its wake.

It’s unclear the number of occupants in the plane or in the homes. The National Transportation Safety Board will conduct an investigation.

‘There was just fire everywhere’ 

Grace Chinn lives in the house at the corner of Woodwind Lane and 51st Street, just west of one hit by the plane. It crashed in her backyard, and she said she’s not sure, but at one point her deck might have been on fire. She and her family were going about their Christmas night when they heard the crash.

“We felt it more than heard it,” Chinn said. “It shook our whole house.”

The family was evacuated not long after the crash.

Across the street on 51st Street, neighbor Brian Monahan was wrapping up desserts and a gift exchange with his family when he saw the plane out his front window. As it nosedived into the space between the two homes, he rushed to help.

“I sprinted over there and there was just fire everywhere,” Monahan said. “It was hard to tell what was plane.”

He estimated 20 others were there to help within a few minutes, grabbing fire extinguishers and putting out a fire on a neighboring deck before police and fire officials arrived on scene.

His daughter, Quinn Monahan called 911 immediately. It wasn’t long before a crowd of dozens of people came out to see the aftermath of the crash.

“I’ve never seen that many people in my neighborhood,” Monahan said.

Neighbor Tim Helgeson, who lives across from Chinn on the west side of Woodwind Lane, said he heard a commotion and saw what he described as a fireball outside his window, and he thought a house exploded. He tried calling 911 five times, but the line was busy.

“It felt like a cement truck racing down the street and then, boom,” Helgeson said. 

T.J. Nelson, deputy chief of staff for Mayor Paul TenHaken, declined to comment until the scene was secured and more information about the incident becomes clear.

Sioux Falls City Council Rick Kiley, who represents the neighborhood and lives a few blocks away, offered his sympathies.

“This is a terrible tragedy anytime but to have it occur on Christmas just makes it even worse,” he said. “My thoughts and prayers are with everyone affected by this terrible event.”

https://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2018/12/25/plane-crashes-into-sioux-falls-homes/2412287002/

The post At least one dead after plane crashes into Sioux Falls neighborhood Christmas evening appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

777 Loses Electrics, Lands Heavy In Brazil

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 12/26/2018 - 08:42

By Russ Niles

The Aviation Herald is reporting that a TAM Boeing 777-300 made a successful but dramatic emergency landing in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on Wednesday. Flight 8084, with more than 350 people on board, was still on the climb on its way to London when it experienced an almost total electrical failure shortly after takeoff from Sao Paulo, about 300 miles southwest. The lack of electrics made it impossible to jettison fuel so overheated brakes on the fully loaded widebody caused all the tires to deflate on landing. Belo Horizonte is a major regional city and its airport has a 10,000-foot runway so the crew headed there. There were no injuries and the plane had only minor damage.

The lights went out less than an hour into the flight and the crew was left with only VHF radio, emergency lighting and a few cockpit displays powered by the emergency ram air turbine. The crew essentially made a night VFR approach and landing with some vectoring help from ATC. The flight crew met with passengers after they were safely in the terminal and answered questions.

https://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news/777-Loses-Electrics-Lands-Heavy-In-Brazil-232028-1.html

The post 777 Loses Electrics, Lands Heavy In Brazil appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Small Plane Crashes In Haulover Beach

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 12/26/2018 - 08:41

By Mike Cugno

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – A small plane crashed in the surf line along Haulover Beach on Monday.

Chopper4 over the scene spotted the plane, which was upside down, bobbing in the lapping waves near the shore. It was Collins Avenue and 108th Street.

The four people who were inside the plane all got out safely. They had minor injuries.

“I was sitting on the beach and the plane was coming down and the engine was putt, putt, putt, putt, putt. And he had to make a crash landing on the beach and he tried to land right where the water and the sand meet and when he hit it flipped upside down,” said witness Chet Molner.

“Well, they were very fortunate because obviously with a plane crash we encounter more major injuries but they were lucky. They were very lucky this time,” said Julio Diaz, Ocean Rescue Lt.

Authorities say the Cessna was flying south when it had engine problems. That’s what forced the pilot to park his plane right in the surf.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the accident.

https://miami.cbslocal.com/2018/12/24/small-plane-went-down-off-sunny-isles-beach/

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Vietjet plane lands on wrong runway at Cam Ranh Airport

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 12/26/2018 - 08:39

By Doan Loan, Xuan Ngoc

Authorities are investigating why a Vietjet Air plane landed on the wrong runway at the Cam Ranh Airport Tuesday.

The plane carrying 163 passengers took off at 11:14 a.m. from Cam Ranh International Airport in the south central coast to Ho Chi Minh City.

Several minutes after takeoff, a technical alarm forced the captain to bring the plane back to Cam Ranh Airport. However, it landed on an unauthorized runway, a mistake similar to one committed by a Vietnam Airlines plane at the same airport last April.

Weather conditions were optimal and all systems were fully functional at the point of landing, the Civil Aviation Authority of Vietnam (CAAV) said Tuesdsay.

No passenger or crew member was hurt by the landing mistake. Another flight was arranged for all passengers to continue their journey.

The incident was deemed “serious,” second only to aviation accidents in Vietnam’s classification of errors, prompting the CAAV to suspend the flight crew pending further investigation.

The CAAV has also decided not to allow an increase in the number of flights by the budget air carrier to the country’s major airports like Noi Bai, Tan Son Nhat, Cam Ranh and Da Nang before a thorough inspection on its operational processes is carried out.

The Cam Ranh International Airport has two runways, only one of which is active. The other had completed construction but was not operational yet.

Vietnam currently requires markings only for runways that are already in use. No markings are needed for those still under construction.

Following the Vietnam Airlines incident, the CAAV has suggested changes to the regulations to prevent similar incidents in the future, including the marking of unused runways.

Vietnam’s aviation industry has experienced rapid growth in recent years. The country served 106 million air passengers this year, up 12.9 percent from last year and highest of all time.

https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/vietjet-plane-lands-on-wrong-runway-at-cam-ranh-airport-3859474.html

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 12/26/2018 - 08:38

25 Years ago today: On 26 December 1993 a Kuban Airlines Antonov An-26B stalled and crashed on approach to Gyumri-Leninakan Airport, Armenia; killing 35 on board.

Date: Sunday 26 December 1993 Time: 20:57 Type: Antonov An-26B Operator: Kuban Airlines Registration: RA-26141 C/n / msn: 12903 First flight: 1983 Engines:Ivchenko AI-24VT Crew: Fatalities: 5 / Occupants: 5 Passengers: Fatalities: 30 / Occupants: 31 Total: Fatalities: 35 / Occupants: 36 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: Gyumri-Leninakan Airport (LWN) (   Armenia) Phase: Landing (LDG) Nature: Cargo Departure airport: Krasnodar Airport (KRR/URKK), Russia Destination airport: Gyumri-Leninakan Airport (LWN/UDSG), Armenia

Narrative:
The An-26 was operating on a cargo flight from Krasnodar (KRR) to Gyumri-Leninakan Airport (LWN). The airplane was loaded with two poorly secured cars and petrol cans. Prior to takeoff the pilot decided to allow 31 passengers on board the flight as well. The airplane was now overloaded.
Weather at the destination was poor with a visibility of 200 m in fog, which was below minima. Nevertheless the crew attempted to land. The airplane contacted the ground as the pilot attempted a go-around. The aircraft stalled and crashed inverted to the left of the runway, 2,990 metres behind the runway threshold.

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Today is Monday the 24th of December, the Eve of Christmas, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 12/24/2018 - 09:43

On this, the eve of Christmas, and throughout this entire holiday season, I’d like to ask everyone to take time during the rush of the holidays to enjoy the things in life that really matter.

Relish the quiet moments spent with friends, families and loved ones. May the wonder of Christmas surround you throughout the Season.

I’d also like to extend a sincere thank you to the men and women, and their families, of those who are serving in the military, to the fire fighters, police officers, paramedics, medical evacuation pilots and crews, dispatchers, nurses, and doctors that are working to protect all of us over this Christmas holiday…

Thank You for what you do to ensure our safety and security.

Best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a safe holiday season!

Tom

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Small Plane Crash Lands at John Wayne Airport, No Major Injuries

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 12/24/2018 - 09:24

By City News Service

A small plane crash-landed today at John Wayne Airport in Costa Mesa, authorities said.

It happened at 4:15 p.m., airport spokeswoman Deanne Thompson said.

“A Piper PA28-140 aircraft with two passengers on board crash-landed on Runway 20R,” Thompson said. “There were minor injuries, no one was transported to the hospital.”

There was a small fuel leak as a result which was contained and there was no fire, she said. The Orange County Fire Authority was removing the aircraft with a crane.

“Runway 20R is open and available for use,” Thompson said. “Airport is functioning normally, with no impact to scheduled flights.”

https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Small-Plane-Crash-Lands-at-John-Wayne-Airport-No-Major-Injuries-503396421.html

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