ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 08/08/2019 - 04:44

30 Years ago today: On 8 August 1989 an Aspiring Air Britten-Norman BN-2A-26 Islander crashed in the Upper Dart Valley, NZ, killing all 10 occupants.

Date: Tuesday 8 August 1989 Time: 10:35 Type: Britten-Norman BN-2A-26 Islander Operator: Aspiring Air Registration: ZK-EVK C/n / msn: 583 First flight: 1977-03-10 (12 years 5 months) Total airframe hrs: 8350 Engines:Lycoming O-540-E4C5 Crew: Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1 Passengers: Fatalities: 9 / Occupants: 9 Total: Fatalities: 10 / Occupants: 10 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: Upper Dart Valley (   New Zealand) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: Domestic Non Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Wanaka Airport (WKA/NZWF), New Zealand Destination airport: Milford Sound Airport (MFN/NZMF), New Zealand

Narrative:
Islander ZK-EVK departed from Wanaka on a VFR scenic flight to Milford Sound but failed to arrive. Wreckage from the aircraft was subsequently located on steep snow covered mountainous terrain at elevations up to 5400 feet. Following initial impact, major portions of the aircraft, including the fuselage, had fallen over precipitous bluffs

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The lack of direct evidence to account, operationally or structurally, for the manner in which the aircraft struck the mountain slope, the remoteness of the site which provided no witness observation to describe the aircraft’s flight path prior to the event and the absence of any survivor, combined to preclude a determination of the accident’s probable cause.”

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Exceptional Fire Officers Must Be Accountable Leaders

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/07/2019 - 15:19

Exceptional Fire Officers Must Be Accountable Leaders

By: Dennis Compton

Have you ever heard someone in your fire department complain about the lack of accountability in the organization? It usually manifests itself through statements like, “what we need around here is more accountability. Nobody’s held accountable for anything in this fire department”. They make it sound as if accountability is something that exists separate and apart from the day-to-day leadership, management, and supervision within the department. In reality, accountability exists (or is lacking) in a fire department because of the quality of leadership, management, and supervision throughout the ranks. Accountability is not an issue that exists in-and-of itself. It exists because there are individual and organizational expectations that require accountability from their leaders and all other members of the department.

An Emphasis on Accountability

The dictionary defines accountable as: “Subject to the obligation to report, explain, or justify something; responsible for or answerable for”. I have developed a model intended to walk leaders through key accountability issues. This “Fire Officer Accountability Model” is made up of the following specific elements designed to define and measure each individual fire officer’s commitment to positive leadership and accountability:

  • Understanding the roles and responsibilities of fire department executive team members and all other officers in the organization. This includes developing open lines of communications and participating in departmental planning exercises and other processes when opportunities present themselves.
  • Valuing personal leadership capabilities and how they impact the officer’s effectiveness. This is often referred to as “command presence” and includes issues such as managing one’s ego; showing respect for other people; maintaining composure in difficult situations; displaying a positive attitude; and always looking the part of a leader as far as personal appearance is concerned.
  • Understanding and respecting the role of “opinion leaders” within the organization and how they can impact the effectiveness of leaders. This includes maintaining open lines of communications, and truly valuing the input of others regarding decision-making.
  • Maintaining one’s personal competence. It’s hard to compensate for incompetence – so participating in training, valuing formal education, and displaying a high regard for diversity become important aspects of developing accountability within oneself.
  • Dealing with difficult situations and difficult people. This includes being aware of heightened levels of emotion that might be present, pre-planning the approach that will be taken to address the matter at hand and getting help from bosses and fellow supervisors when needed.
  • Understanding and enforcing the performance requirements for all members in the department. This includes important aspects of accountability such as communicating performance and behavior expectations up front; leading by example; never rewarding unacceptable performance or behavior; consistently enforcing rules; following organizational values and following procedures; as well as avoiding the practices of favoritism and micro-management.
  • Understanding the relationship between leadership and management responsibilities of fire officers. This involves the importance of developing fire officer management and leadership skills in a way that demonstrates their interrelatedness and the value both have to individual and organizational effectiveness and accountability.

In addition to the items identified above, there are also some other important elements the organization needs to create and provide to all members to enhance the quality of leadership and accountability throughout the fire department. These additional requirements that must be provided include:

  • A clearly defined mission and a planning document that provides direction to the members of the organization.
  • A consistent set of expectations for performance and behavior that includes   clear and definitive organizational values.
  • The training and resources needed to perform the mission of the organization.
  • A well-known system of rewards and consequences that are equally applied.
  • Strong first level supervision at all levels in the department. The leadership, management, supervision, and overall job performance of fire officers impacts the members of the fire department every day, and in all aspects of the department’s work. What officers provide to the fire department through their technical competence, people skills, attitude, and commitment has a direct effect on performance outcomes, morale, and the work environment.
  • It’s not difficult to develop a list of positive fire officer traits, skills, and characteristics… and that list would certainly be important to evaluating fire officer performance. Consistently exceptional and accountable fire officers demonstrate the following characteristics:

An Emphasis on Leadership

The leadership, management, supervision, and overall job performance of fire officers impacts the members of the fire department every day, and in all aspects of the department’s work. What officers provide to the fire department through their technical competence, people skills, attitude, and commitment has a direct effect on performance outcomes, morale, and the work environment.

It’s not difficult to develop a list of positive fire officer traits, skills, and characteristics… and that list would certainly be important to evaluating fire officer performance. Consistently exceptional and accountable fire officers demonstrate the following characteristics:

  • A positive and productive work atmosphere is the order of the day, and the fire officer creates and nurtures it. Members of the department clearly understand what is expected of them regarding their performance and behavior…and this is communicated by the fire officers – up front – but never in an “in your face” kind of way.
  • The fire officer always leads by example, building a sense of mutual trust and mutual respect among the members of the department. The fire officer knows the job, does it well, and expects the same from others.
  • The members demonstrate pride in themselves, each other, and in the fire department.
  • Self-discipline is a shared value within the fire department. Expectations are clear, Standard Operating Procedures are followed, and when self-discipline breaks down, appropriate action is taken by the fire officer to correct the situation and put the member(s) back on a positive course.
  • The fire officer maintains their competence and ensures that the members receive the appropriate training to stay competent as well. In all that they do, exceptional performance, serving the needs of the customers and the members, as well as emphasizing the importance of safety, are always priorities. In doing so, the fire officer understands and communicates the fact that prevention, public education, and emergency response are equally important in protecting the lives and property in their community – and that each of these responsibilities requires the department’s commitment in order to be effective.
  • Work is planned and completed under the supervision of the fire officer, and appropriate leadership, supervision, and management are provided throughout their full range of duties.
  • The willingness to communicate, mentor, coach and counsel on a regular basis helps the fire officer maintain consistently high levels of performance by the members of the department. When problems occur, they are not allowed to fester…they are addressed in a constructive way by the appropriate fire officer(s).
  • The fire officer maintains a positive, productive, and healthy approach to the fire department, and is open to change. They don’t build themselves up by putting other fire officers down.
  • Maintaining control of their own happiness and their own future, as well as having the ability to let go of negative things that occurred in the past, are key traits of exceptional fire officers demonstrate. They have an incredible capability to maintain perspective in a balanced way.

 

About the Author: Chief Dennis Compton is a well-known speaker and the author of several books including his most recent offering titled Progressive Leadership Principles, Concepts, and Tools. He has also authored the three-part series of books titled When in Doubt, Lead, the book Mental Aspects of Performance for Firefighters and Fire Officers, as well as many articles, chapters, etc. for other publications.  Dennis served as the Fire Chief in Mesa, Arizona for five years and as Assistant Fire Chief in Phoenix, Arizona, where he served for twenty-seven years. Chief Compton is the Past Chairman of the Executive Board of the International Fire Service Training Association (IFSTA) and Past Chairman of the Congressional Fire Services Institute’s National Advisory Committee. He is currently the Chairman of the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation Board of Directors. He has been the recipient of many awards recognizing his leadership and performance.

We know that there are many traits, skills, and behaviors that contribute to (or hinder) effective fire officer leadership, management, supervision, and overall performance…all of which have an impact on accountability. The content of this article provides a template and roadmap for developing exceptional fire officers, who are also accountable leaders. Fire officers have a lot of influence on the people within the fire department and on the mission itself. Bottom line…exceptional fire officers and leaders are organizational treasures…and should be recognized as such.

 

 

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Witness describes helping pilot after plane flipped into water off Kitsap Peninsula

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/07/2019 - 06:53

One person is safe after their plane crashed into the water near Kitsap County on Tuesday afternoon.

Author: KING Staff

A pilot is safe after a small plane crashed into Dyes Inlet near Silverdale on Tuesday afternoon. He suffered a minor injury to his face in the crash.

Central Kitsap Fire and Rescue said the pilot was the only person on board and safely rescued to a nearby boat.

Emergency crews responded to reports of a plane crash after 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Four civilian boats in the area arrived first to the crash scene and helped the pilot to safety.

A woman was tubing with her family when she recorded the small plane coming in for a landing. When the plane crash-landed and flipped upside down, her family rushed over to help the pilot to safety.

A police boat towed the plane, which flipped upside down in the crash, to a nearby dock on Dyes Inlet.

https://www.king5.com/article/news/local/witness-describes-helping-pilot-after-plane-flipped-into-water-off-kitsap-peninsula/281-8a0f3c79-3984-4b0a-a2d1-bf99ff2f1e95

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2 dead in plane crash near Yukon’s Mayo Lake

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/07/2019 - 06:52

C208 Caravan aircraft had 1 pilot, 1 passenger on board, Alkan Air says

CBC News

Two people have died after a small plane crashed on a mountainside near Mayo Lake, in Yukon, on Tuesday, according the airline.

The plane, an Cessna 208 Caravan operated by Alkan Air, was reported missing just after 12 p.m. local time on Tuesday after leaving Rackla, en route to Mayo, a community of roughly 200 people about 320 kilometres north of Whitehorse.

Rackla is an exploratory camp for possible gold mining. The camp’s airstrip is about 150 kilometres northeast of Mayo.

The pilot and one passenger were on board, according to a statement from the airline. Their identities have not been released.

A fly-over located the plane at about 1:30 p.m., according to the statement. The airline is currently working with emergency response teams and local authorities to access the site.

“At this time we can confirm that there are no survivors on-board,” the airline said.

“Our hearts go out to everyone that is involved, this is truly a heartbreaking time at Alkan Air.”

The Transportation Safety Board says it will arrive in Mayo to begin its investigation into the incident on Thursday, according to spokesperson Alex Fournier.

Fournier added that RCMP will assist TSB investigators on reaching the remote site.

Alkan Air is headquartered in Whitehorse. Operating since 1977, its 23-aircraft fleet primarily provides charter and medevac services in Yukon, British Columbia and Alaska, though it operated a scheduled service between Whitehorse and Watson Lake from 2016 to 2018.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/alkan-air-aircraft-accident-1.5238183

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Kan. man avoids injury after small plane makes emergency landing

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/07/2019 - 06:50

BY POST STAFF

MONTGOMERY COUNTY — A Kansas man avoided injury after a small plane made an emergency landing just before 10a.m. Tuesday in Montgomery County.

The Kansas Highway Patrol reported a Zenith Zodiac piloted by John C. Cambron, Jr., 64, Coffeyville, was taking off from the Harmony Valley Airpark, east of Independence.

Shortly after takeoff the aircraft started pulling to the right, so the pilot attempted an emergency landing on the grass field just north of the runway.

At landing the left wing tip touched ground and the nose wheel dug in forcing it to collapse and the aircraft came to a stop.

Cambron was uninjured and able to climb out of the aircraft, according to the KHP. The accident remains under investigation.

http://www.hutchpost.com/kan-man-avoids-injury-after-small-plane-makes-emergency-landing/

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/07/2019 - 06:48

22 Years ago today: On 7 August 1997 a Fine Air DC-8-61F crashed on takeoff from Miami International Airport, FL (MIA) due to misloading of the aircraft; killing four on board and one person on the ground.

Date: Thursday 7 August 1997 Time: 12:36 Type: McDonnell Douglas DC-8-61F Operator: Fine Air Registration: N27UA C/n / msn: 45942/349 First flight: 1968 Total airframe hrs: 46825 Cycles: 41688 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT3D-3B Crew: Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 3 Passengers: Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1 Total: Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4 Ground casualties: Fatalities: 1 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Miami International Airport, FL (MIA) (   United States of America) Crash site elevation: 2 m (7 feet) amsl Phase: Initial climb (ICL) Nature: Cargo Departure airport: Miami International Airport, FL (MIA/KMIA), United States of America Destination airport: Santo Domingo-Las Américas International Airport (SDQ/MDSD), Dominican Republic Flightnumber: 101A

Narrative:
Fine Air Flight 101 was originally scheduled to depart Miami for Santo Domingo at 09:15 using another DC-8 airplane, N30UA, to carry cargo for Aeromar. Due to a delay of the inbound aircraft, Fine Air substituted N27UA for N30UA and rescheduled the departure for 12:00. N27UA arrived at Miami at 09:31 from San Juan, Puerto Rico, and was parked at the Fine Air hangar ramp. The security guard was not aware of the airplane change, and he instructed Aeromar loaders to load the airplane in accordance with the weight distribution form he possessed for N30UA. The first cargo pallet for flight 101 was loaded onto N27UA at 10:30 and the last pallet was loaded at 12:06. The resulting center of gravity (CG) of the accident airplane was near or even aft of the airplane’s aft CG limit. After the three crew members and the security guard had boarded the plane, the cabin door `was closed at 12:22. Eleven minutes later the flight obtained taxi clearance for runway 27R. The Miami tower controller cleared flight 101 for takeoff at 12:34. Takeoff power was selected and the DC-8 moved down the runway. The flightcrew performed an elevator check at 80 knots. Fourteen seconds later the sound of a thump was heard. Just after calling V1 a second thump was heard. Two seconds later the airplane rotated. Immediately after takeoff the airplane pitched nose-up and entered a stall. The DC-8 recovered briefly from the stall, and stalled again. The airplane impacted terrain in a tail first, right wing down attitude. it slid west across a road (72nd Avenue) and into the International Airport Center at 28th Street and burst into flames. 
Investigation showed that the center of gravity resulted in the airplane’s trim being mis-set by at least 1.5 units airplane nose up, which presented the flightcrew with a pitch control problem on takeoff

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident, which resulted from the airplane being misloaded to produce a more aft center of gravity and a correspondingly incorrect stabilizer trim setting that precipitated an extreme pitch-up at rotation, was (1) the failure of Fine Air to exercise operational control over the cargo loading process; and (2) the failure of Aeromar to load the airplane as specified by Fine Air. Contributing to the accident was the failure of the FAA to adequately monitor Fine Airs operational control responsibilities for cargo loading and the failure of the FAA to ensure that known cargo-related deficiencies were corrected at Fine Air.”

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Today is Tuesday the 6th of August, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 06:05

Here are the stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Two taken to hospital after small plane crashes in field near Miami Executive Airport

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 06:03

BY MICHELLE MARCHANTE

A small plane has crashed near Miami Executive Airport Monday morning.

The Piper PA-28 crashed after departing from Miami Executive Airport at 9:40 a.m., according to Kathleen Bergen, a spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane landed on a grassy field owned by the airport, which used to be called the Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport.

Two people were taken to the hospital, one in serious condition, a spokeswoman for Miami-Dade Fire Rescue said. A third passenger was treated at the scene and later released.

The passengers’ identities have not been released yet.

The fixed wing single-engine plane, numbered “N5915U,” is owned by Osorio Aviation Corp, a Miami-Dade for-profit corporation, according to FAA records. The plane’s certificate is still valid and will expire in February 2022, according to the FAA.

The company, which was registered in April 2017 with the state, became inactive in September 2018 for failing to file the required annual reports or other legal guidelines, according to Sunbiz.org.

The corporation is registered under Joao Osorio, who was also the corporation’s director.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article233533882.html

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Four dead in plane crash near Girdwood witnessed by elite Alaskan skiers on nearby glacier

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 06:01

Author: Zaz Hollander

No one survived the fiery crash of a plane outside Girdwood on Sunday evening that killed four, authorities say.

A private pilot and three passengers died in the crash of the Piper PA-22, according to a Federal Aviation Administration site. Authorities didn’t immediately respond to requests for more information.

The plane “crashed under unknown circumstances after takeoff,” according to the FAA site. It departed from Girdwood. The National Transportation Safety Board tweeted Monday that it was investigating the accident.

The crash was reported at about 5 p.m. Sunday on Goat Mountain near Eagle Glacier at about 5,000 feet elevation, troopers spokesman Ken Marsh said in an email. An Alaska National Guard Pave Hawk helicopter confirmed the crash and “that there were no survivors.”

The wreckage of the plane was incinerated in a post-crash fire, said Clint Johnson, NTSB Alaska chief.

Troopers and an NTSB investigator headed to the scene Monday to assess the terrain and develop a recovery plan, authorities said.

Members of Alaska Pacific University’s elite ski team were training on the glacier when the plane went down just over a ridge.

Luke Jager, a 19-year-old member of the U.S. Cross Country Ski Team, said he and other skiers were out for an afternoon training session.

“I had my head down and was listening to music so I didn’t actually see the plane hit, but we saw lots of black smoke coming from the mountain side all of a sudden,” Jager said in a text message. Skiers heard an explosion, and watched “a massive face of the ridge overlooking the glacier collapse and slide. It was huge. I have to imagine the two were related somehow.”

Jager saw teammates above him on the course and yelled to them, asking what happened. They said they’d seen a plane crash, he said, “so I turned around and skied as fast as I could from the course up to the building to let (coach Erik) Flora know what was going on. He was really good about making sure everyone took a deep breath before we proceeded.”

Flora and the team loaded glacier travel gear onto a snowmachine but couldn’t get to the crash site, Jager said. The coach called Alpine Air in Girdwood and they sent a helicopter to the site.

An Alpine Air representative had no comment Monday.

The National Guard helicopter arrived within an hour. The Guard sent the Pave Hawk and two pararescuemen, a spokeswoman said. They rappelled down to the wreckage.

“We were all really saddened to hear the outcome of it,” Jager texted Monday. “I think we were all kind of prepared for that though. It didn’t look like the kind of thing a person could survive.”

Twenty-five people have now died in 11 fatal plane crashes in Alaska so far this year, according to an NTSB database. That total includes six people who died in one crash in May when two floatplanes carrying passengers from the same cruise ship collided in midair near Ketchikan.

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/aviation/2019/08/05/troopers-no-survivors-in-plane-crash-on-mountain-near-girdwood/

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Private jet carrying Pink’s manager and crew crash lands and bursts into flames in Denmark after her performance in Norway

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 05:59
  • Ten passengers and crew, including Pink’s manager, escaped the blaze last night
  • They included a British national as well as four Americans and two Australians 
  • Fire crews rushed to the stricken Cessna 560XL at Aarhus Airport early Tuesday
  • Pictures showed the private jet being hauled from turf beside the runway today 

By ROSS IBBETSON FOR MAILONLINE

A private jet carrying Pink’s manager and crew crash landed and burst into flames in Denmark after her performance in Norway last night. 

Emergency services rushed to the Cessna 560XL after it ploughed into turf beside the runway at Aarhus Airport in Tirstrup in the early hours of Tuesday.

The US singer’s manager and other tour staff, who were coming from a concert in Oslo, were among the ten aboard who all escaped without injuries.

They included one British national, four Americans and two Australians, with two crew members from Germany and one from Austria.

Pink was not aboard the aircraft which reportedly caught fire as it made its final descent before crashing to the ground at 12.38am.

Fire crews were able to put out the flames and the passengers were taken to a nearby hotel where they stayed the night, DR reported.

Kristin Svendsen, Pink’s ticket manager for the Oslo concert, told VG: ‘Pink personally was not on the plane. But her manager was there – and several other tour members – but everything has gone well.’

The German-registered plane was supposed to land at Aarhus after midnight and it is not yet known what caused the crash.

Those investigations will be handled by the Danish air crash investigations authorities. 

Danish police said the aircraft was towed away from the runway and the incident would cause no problems to the flow of traffic at Aarhus Airport today.

Pink is scheduled to perform in Horsens in Denmark on Wednesday night and according to Jyllands-Posten, the organisers believe the event will go ahead.

Pink rose to fame in the early 2000s with number one hits and has won three Grammy awards.

She is touring Europe with new songs from her latest album, ‘Beautiful Trauma.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7326301/Private-jet-carrying-Pinks-manager-crew-crash-lands-bursts-flames-Denmark.html

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British Airways Flight Makes Emergency Landing After “Smoke” Fills Cabin

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 05:57

A British Airways flight has made an emergency landing after the cabin filled with smoke.

Videos circulating on social media appear to show a smoke filled plane making an emergency landing, before passengers are evacuated using the inflatable slides. 

Miguel Galindo said his daughter Balma was on flight BA422 which flew for ten minutes with a smoke filled cabin.

A British Airways spokesperson said “We can confirm that British Airways flight BA422 from Heathrow to Valencia has been involved in an incident today.

The aircraft, an A321, has landed and all customers and crew have disembarked. British Airways teams are assisting customers who are in the airport terminal.”

One witness told LBC there was “no communication” from the cabin crew and “no oxygen.”

https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/british-airways-flight-makes-emergency-landing/

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One Dead, Six Survive Plane Crash On Upper Raft Lake

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 05:55

By Muskoka 411 Staff

424 Transport and Rescue Squadron airlifts six people from Upper Raft Lake.

The crew of a Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CH-146 Griffon helicopter from 424 Transport and Rescue Squadron airlifted six people from Upper Raft Lake today (Monday).

NAV CANADA’s Flight Information Centre requested assistance from the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre (JRCC) Trenton to provide assisted following the report of a floatplane crash.

The crew of the CH-146 Griffon helicopter from 424 Transport and Rescue Squadron were tasked at 10:00 a.m. and hoisted two Search and Rescue Technicians (SAR Techs) to the scene.

Two additional SAR Techs parachuted from the C-130H Hercules overhead and provided medical attention to the six survivors. One person was found without vital signs.

The Griffon transported all six survivors to Muskoka Airport where the three injured were transferred to Paramedic personnel for further medical assessment and care. There were seven people in total on the plane.

The name of the person has not been released. More information will be provided as it becomes available.

https://muskoka411.com/start/one-dead-six-survive-plane-crash-on-upper-raft-lake/

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King Power helicopter crash firefighter speaks for first time about tragedy that claimed 5 lives

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 05:53

‘There was a very sombre mood all around. A lot of the lads are Leicester fans’

By Alan Thompson – 04:00, 6 AUG 2019

One of the first firefighters on the scene of the tragic helicopter crash at the King Power stadium which claimed five lives, including the Leicester City chairman, Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, has spoken publicly for the first time about the horrific incident.

Joe Robinson, 32, a firefighter at the city’s Central fire station, described how the aircraft was “engulfed in flames” as he and colleagues fought the fire from just a few feet away. 

With updated messages coming in as they sped to the scene on the night of the tragedy, he and colleagues donned breathing equipment, ready to tackle the blaze.

He and three colleagues, who fought the blaze alongside him, are to run the Leicester Half Marathon in full kit and breathing equipment, minus masks,  in the city in October – a year to the month after the crash – to raise money for the Firefighters’ Charity and the Vichai Foundation.

Recalling the fateful night of October 27, 2018, Joe, of Burbage, said: “We were having a bit of a farewell do for a firefighter with 20 years in leaving to go to another station.

“We were having cake and just about to order our evening meals at the chip shop having started at 7pm.

“At about 8.30pm the bells went. Someone read out the message on the printer which said a helicopter had crashed at the King Power.

“We all knew the club’s chairman left after the game in a helicopter, so we had a rough idea whose it was.

“The message said the helicopter had crashed and there were five people on board. We were outside Leicester Tigers ground en route when we got that message.

“Nothing majorly was said. I was in the back of the truck with Nick Lack who was relatively new in service.

“Knowing there was a helicopter involved there were certain precautions we had to take.

“I am pretty good at keeping a cool head and I said ‘let’s get our BA (Breathing apparatus) kits on’.

“We were the first two trucks there. We saw it on fire. It was fully engulfed in flames.

“Me and Nick had BA on.

“There was a hose already laid out, we picked it up and started putting water, then foam on the fire.

“We were probably within six feet of the flames, smoke surrounded us and there was just a giant ball of fire, it was all we could see.

“We can always feel the heat at fires but we are so well trained in our jobs to deal with it.

“We knew it was quite a big deal, given the likely profile of those involved.

“Me, Nick and the other two lads were there putting water and foam onto the flames.

“After that it was a bit of a blur, what had happened. We heard that some police officers had tried to get people out of the helicopter but by the time we were there it was fully engulfed in flames.”

He added: “Fire trucks and specialist appliances from all over the city and county were there.

“After a break at about 2.30am we got our BA on and went back down to the scene.

“The fire had died down by then and there were people there trying to identify the casualties.

“There was a very sombre mood all around. A lot of the lads are Leicester fans.”

A few days later, those that were able, Dave Tannant, Jamie Gear and Nick Lack, returned to the King Power to join the legions of fans paying tribute to the chairman and others lost in the tragedy.

On Sunday, October 6, Joe and colleagues from that night, Dave Tennant, 34, of Wigston, Jamie Gear, 40, of Barlestone and Nick Lack, 38, of Hugglescote, near Coalville, will run the Leicester Half Marathon in full kit, wearing their compressed air tanks, weighing 15kg.

Joe added: “We decided to do something as a New Year resolution and Dave asked if anybody fancied doing the half marathon in full kit for charity. 

“The Firefighters’ Charity was our obvious choice but we are also raising money for the Vichai Foundation.

“All four of us were on the first fire engines to attend the tragic helicopter accident last year at the King Power stadium so we felt it was appropriate to give something back for the tragic loss.”

He added: “We have been doing running training for 3-4 weeks every other day, doing between three and five miles.

“We’ve also been running with weight on our backs. The company which provides our kit is giving us some lighter, less padded gear to run in, but the BA tanks weigh about 15kg.

“Anything under three hours would be lovely and we want to run as a group of four.”

To donate to the Firefighters’ Charity click here. Alternatively to make a donation to the Vichai Foundation follow this link.

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/king-power-helicopter-crash-firefighters-3174572

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 05:49

22 Years ago today: On 6 August 1997 a Korean Air Boeing 747-3B5 crashed on approach to Guam, killing 228 out of 254 occupants.

Date: Wednesday 6 August 1997 Time: 01:42 Type: Boeing 747-3B5 Operator: Korean Air Registration: HL7468 C/n / msn: 22487/605 First flight: 1984-12-03 (12 years 8 months) Total airframe hrs: 50105 Cycles: 8552 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT9D-7R4G2 Crew: Fatalities: 22 / Occupants: 23 Passengers: Fatalities: 206 / Occupants: 231 Total: Fatalities: 228 / Occupants: 254 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 4,8 km (3 mls) SW of Guam-Agana International Airport (GUM) (   Guam) Crash site elevation: 201 m (659 feet) amsl Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Seoul-Gimpo (Kimpo) International Airport (SEL/RKSS), South Korea Destination airport: Guam-A.B. Won Pat International Airport (GUM/PGUM), Guam Flightnumber: KE801

Narrative:
Korean Air Flight 801 was a regular flight from Seoul to Guam. The Boeing 747-300 departed the gate about 21:27 and was airborne about 21:53. The captain was pilot-flying.
Upon arrival to the Guam area, the first officer made initial contact with the Guam Combined Center/Radar Approach Control (CERAP) controller about 01:03, when the airplane was level at 41,000 feet and about 240 nm northwest of the NIMITZ VOR/DME. The CERAP controller told flight 801 to expect to land on runway 06L. About 01:10, the controller instructed flight 801 to “…descend at your discretion maintain two thousand six hundred.” The first officer responded, “…descend two thousand six hundred pilot discretion.”
The captain then began briefing the first officer and the flight engineer about the approach and landing at Guam: “I will give you a short briefing…ILS is one one zero three…NIMITZ VOR is one one five three, the course zero six three, since the visibility is six, when we are in the visual approach, as I said before, set the VOR on number two and maintain the VOR for the TOD [top of descent], I will add three miles from the VOR, and start descent when we’re about one hundred fifty five miles out. I will add some more speed above the target speed. Well, everything else is all right. In case of go-around, since it is VFR, while staying visual and turning to the right…request a radar vector…if not, we have to go to FLAKE…since the localizer glideslope is out, MDA is five hundred sixty feet and HAT [height above touchdown] is three hundred four feet….”
About 01:13 the captain said, “we better start descent;” shortly thereafter, the first officer advised the controller that flight 801 was “leaving four one zero for two thousand six hundred.” During the descent it appeared that the weather at Guam was worsening. At 01:24 requested a deviation 10 miles to the left to avoid severe weather.
At 01:31 the first officer reported to the CERAP controller that the airplane was clear of cumulonimbus clouds and requested “radar vectors for runway six left.” The controller instructed the flight crew to fly a heading of 120°. After this transmission, the flight crew performed the approach checklist and verified the radio frequency for the ILS to runway 06L.
About 01:38 the CERAP controller instructed flight 801 to “…turn left heading zero nine zero join localizer;” the first officer acknowledged this transmission. At that time, flight 801 was descending through 2,800 feet msl with the flaps extended 10° and the landing gear up. One minute later the controller stated, “Korean Air eight zero one cleared for ILS runway six left approach…glideslope unusable.” The first officer responded, “Korean eight zero one roger…cleared ILS runway six left;” his response did not acknowledge that the glideslope was unusable. The flight engineer asked, “is the glideslope working? glideslope? yeh?” One second later, the captain responded, “yes, yes, it’s working.” About 01:40, an unidentified voice in the cockpit stated, “check the glideslope if working?” This statement was followed 1 second later by an unidentified voice in the cockpit asking, “why is it working?” The first officer responded, “not useable.” The altitude alert system chime sounded and the airplane began to descend from an altitude of 2,640 feet msl at a point approximately 9 nm from the runway 06L threshold. About 01:40:22, an unidentified voice in the cockpit said, “glideslope is incorrect.” As the airplane was descending through 2,400 feet msl, the first officer stated, “approaching fourteen hundred.” About 4 seconds later, when the airplane was about 8 nm from the runway 06L threshold, the captain stated, “since today’s glideslope condition is not good, we need to maintain one thousand four hundred forty. please set it.” An unidentified voice in the cockpit then responded, “yes.” About 01:40:42, the CERAP controller instructed flight 801 to contact the Agana control tower. The first officer contacted the Agana tower: “Korean air eight zero one intercept the localizer six left.” The airplane was descending below 2,000 feet msl at a point 6.8 nm from the runway threshold (3.5 nm from the VOR). About 01:41:01, the Agana tower controller cleared flight 801 to land. About 01:41:14, as the airplane was descending through 1,800 feet msl, the first officer acknowledged the landing clearance, and the captain requested 30° of flaps.
The first officer called for the landing checklist and at 01:41:33, the captain said, “look carefully” and “set five hundred sixty feet” (the published MDA). The first officer replied “set,” the captain called for the landing checklist, and the flight engineer began reading the landing checklist. About 01:41:42, as the airplane descended through 1,400 feet msl, the ground proximity warning system (GPWS) sounded with the radio altitude callout “one thousand [feet].” One second later, the captain stated, “no flags gear and flaps,” to which the flight engineer responded, “no flags gear and flaps.” About 01:41:46, the captain asked, “isn’t glideslope working?” The captain then stated, “wiper on.” About 01:41:53, the first officer again called for the landing checklist, and the flight engineer resumed reading the checklist items. About 01:41:59, when the airplane was descending through 1,100 feet msl at a point about 4.6 nm from the runway 06L threshold (approximately 1.3 nm from the VOR), the first officer stated “not in sight?” One second later, the GPWS radio altitude callout sounded: “five hundred [feet].” About 01:42:14, as the airplane was descending through 840 feet msl and the flight crew was performing the landing checklist, the GPWS issued a “minimums minimums” annunciation followed by a “sink rate” alert about 3 seconds later. The first officer responded, “sink rate okay”. At that time the airplane was descending 1,400 feet per minute.
About 01:42:19, as the airplane descended through 730 feet msl, the flight engineer stated, “two hundred [feet],” and the first officer said, “let’s make a missed approach.” About one second later, the flight engineer stated, “not in sight,” and the first officer said, “not in sight, missed approach.” About 01:42:22, as the airplane descended through approximately 680 feet msl, the nose began to pitch up and the flight engineer stated, “go around.” When the captain stated “go around” power was added and airspeed began to increase. As the airplane descended through 670 feet msl, the autopilot disconnect warning sounded. The GPWS radio altitude callouts continued: “one hundred…fifty…forty…thirty…twenty [feet].” About 01:42:26, the airplane impacted hilly terrain at Nimitz Hill, Guam, about 660 feet msl and about 3.3 nm from the runway 06L -threshold. It struck trees and slid through dense vegetation before coming to rest. A post-impact fire broke out.
It was established a.o. that the software fix for the Minimum Safe Altitude Warning (MSAW) system at Agana Center Radar Approach Control (CERAP) had rendered the program useless. A software patch had been installed since there had been complaints of the high rate of false MSAW alarms at Guam. This made KAL801’s descent below MDA go undetected at the Agana CERAP

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The captain’s failure to adequately brief and execute the nonprecision approach and the first officer’s and flight engineer’s failure to effectively monitor and cross-check the captain’s execution of the approach. Contributing to these failures were the captain’s fatigue and Korean Air’s inadequate flight crew training. Contributing to the accident was the Federal Aviation Administration’s intentional inhibition of the minimum safe altitude warning system and the agency’s failure to adequately to manage the system.”

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Today is Monday the 5th of August, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:50

Here are the stories to kick off the new week…

Be safe out there!
Tom

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Three Uninjured As Small Plane Overshoots Runway At Oakland Int’l Airport

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:49

OAKLAND (CBS SF) — No one was injured Sunday morning when a single-engine Cessna airplane went off a runway at Oakland International Airport and buried its nose into the ground past the runway, an Oakland Fire Department battalion chief said.

Firefighters responded about 10:35 a.m. Sunday to runway 15-33, which Oakland Fire Battalion Chief Frank Tijiboy said was short compared to others at Oakland International.

“He bounced a few times, and then tried to lift off again” when he realized he didn’t have enough room to land, Tijiboy said. “Had he landed on another runway, it wouldn’t have been an issue.”

The plane, unable to become airborne again, went off the end of the runway. Three men aboard the plane “were a little shaken up” but uninjured, said Oakland Fire Capt. Sean Gascie.

Port of Oakland spokeswoman Marilyn Sandifur said the plane, based in Oakland, had flown into Oakland from Paso Robles. The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the accident, Sandifur said.

https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2019/08/04/small-plane-overshoots-runway-oak-intl-airport/

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Four injured after small plane crashes in Saginaw County

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:46

By Cole Waterman | Cole_Waterman@mlive.com

HEMLOCK, MI – Four people were injured after a small plane crashed in rural Saginaw County. 

At 10:02 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 3, Saginaw County Central Dispatch was alerted to the crash in the 14000 block of Spencer Road in Richland Township, about halfway between Hemlock and St. Charles.

Sheriff’s deputies and Richland Township firefighters responded to the scene.

They arrived to find a Cessna 185 upside down on the south side of the road.

The plane’s 62-year-old male pilot suffered minor facial lacerations. His three passengers — a man and woman, both 64 years old, and a 61-year-old woman — sustained bumps and bruises, officials said.

All four people were transported to Hurley Medical Center in Flint for treatment.

They were flying from Flint to Beaver Island in Charlevoix County, according to Sheriff William Federspiel.

Federal Aviation Administration also responded to the scene.

As of 12:30 p.m. Saturday, the wreckage remains on the side of the road with deputies securing the scene.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

https://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw-bay-city/2019/08/four-injured-after-small-plane-crashes-in-saginaw-county.html

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Plane crash in east Lincoln

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:44

By 1011 NOW

LINCOLN, Neb. (KOLN)- An aircraft has crashed in east Lincoln on Sunday. Rescue crews responded to a crash of a small ultralight aircraft around 11:23 a.m. near 102nd and Holdrege Street at Pester Airport, a private airport east of Lincoln.

According to officials, when the plane was found it had its nose in the ground. Only one person was on plane, and they were able to get out after they crashed. The pilot went to the hospital with unknown injuries.

Injuries and the cause of the crash are unclear. This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available.

https://www.1011now.com/content/news/Plane-crash-in-East-Lincoln-518609701.html

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Plane crashes in marsh near the Dames Point Bridge in Jacksonville

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/05/2019 - 06:42

By: Aurielle Eady , Action News Jax

The plane that crashed into the marsh near the Dames Point Bridge Saturday morning has been taken out of the water Sunday.

A plane crashed into the marsh near the Dames Point Bridge on Saturday morning.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Piper PA-28 landed in the marsh water around 10:13 a.m.

The aircraft experienced “an engine-related problem,” just two miles north of the Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport that it departed from, the FAA said.

The Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department said the pilot of the plane was rescued by a Good Samaritan. He was the only person aboard the plane.

There are no reported injuries and no report of a fuel spill, JFRD said in a tweet.

Officials are investigating.

https://www.actionnewsjax.com/news/local/jfrd-responding-to-possible-plane-crash-near-dames-point-bridge/972477151

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