ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Small plane lands short of Yeager Airport runway

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 09/05/2019 - 10:42

By MetroNews Staff

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A small-engine plane landed short of Yeager Airport’s main runway late Wednesday night, authorities said.

The incident happened around 11:20 p.m. The plane landed in the emergency stopping area, the airport’s EMAS system, at the end of its main runway.

Kanawha County authorities said the pilot was injured but later seen walking around. He refused medical treatment. He’s from the Charleston area.

Information released by Yeager Airport early Thursday morning described the plane as a Cessna 182J, tail number N2408Q.

The airport’s runway reopened by 2:30 a.m. All of the commercial flights for Wednesday had landed before the incident occurred.

An investigation into what caused the pilot to miss the runway is under investigation.

http://wvmetronews.com/2019/09/05/plane-crash-reported-at-yeager-airport/

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Off-duty Arizona police officer dies piloting small plane

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 09/05/2019 - 10:40

By Brie Stimson | Fox News

An off-duty Arizona police sergeant died when a small plane he was flying crashed Wednesday morning, according to reports.

Tucson Police Department Sgt. Timothy Froebe’s ultralight aircraft crashed in Benson, Ariz., about 50 miles southeast of Tucson just before 8 a.m., KOLD News 13 reported.

Witnesses from the ground said he was struggling with the throttle just before the crash.

Froebe took off from the Benson Airport where he had a hanger, investigators told KOLD.

Froebe joined the Tucson Police Department in 1995 and was promoted to sergeant in 2007. He also served as a Marine from 1978 until 2012.

“Sergeant Froebe served his country for 34 years, and locally served his community for 24 years. He is survived by his wife, four children, many more family members, friends, and colleagues,” the department said in a statement.

They said they extend their “deepest condolences to Sergeant Froebe’s family and friends. He was loved and respected by so many at TPD and he will be deeply missed.”

The Benson Police Department is investigating the crash.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/off-duty-arizona-police-officer-dies-while-piloting-small-plane

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Airplane crash lands in Adair County Wed. morning

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 09/05/2019 - 10:38

by Ric Hanson

Adair County Sheriff Jeff Vandewater reports the Adair County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call at around 7:10-a.m. today (Wednesday), with regard to an airplane crash. An adult male walked to the caller’s residence to report the crash.

First Responders from the Fontanelle Fire and Rescue Department, Fontanelle Police and the Adair County Sheriff’s Office responded to the scene located about one-mile northwest of Greenfield. The pilot of a 1966 Piper Cherokee 140 aircraft was identified as 59-year old Eric William Chrystal, of Jefferson. He was transported to the Adair County Memorial Hospital in Greenfield, for treatment of suspected minor injuries, and later released.

Vandewater said the plane crashed into a corn field, coming to rest on its top. An investigation into the cause of the crash was underway. The Adair County S/O is assisting the FAA and NTSB in their investigation.

http://www.kjan.com/index.php/2019/09/airplane-crash-lands-in-adair-county-wed-morning/

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No one injured in Van Wert County plane crash

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 09/05/2019 - 10:37

VAN WERT — No one was injured in a plane crash in Van Wert County on Wednesday.

In a news release, Van Wert County Sheriff Thomas M. Riggenbach reported that just after 5:30 p.m., his office was notified of the plane crash. When officials arrived, they determined an ultralight aircraft had crashed in a soybean field at the southeast corner of Lincoln Highway and Richey Road.

The aircraft was a 1997 Phantom X1, which was flown by Joshua J. Huber, 32, of Convoy. He was not hurt in the crash.

The investigation is continuing, and the Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted as part of the investigation.

https://www.limaohio.com/news/372649/van-wert-osp-investigating-plane-crash

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 09/05/2019 - 10:35

65 Years ago today: On 5 September 1954 a KLM Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation crashed into a river after takeoff from Shannon, Ireland, killing 28 out of 56 occupants.

Date: Sunday 5 September 1954 Time: 02:39 Type: Lockheed L-1049C-55-81 Super Constellation Operator: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Registration: PH-LKY C/n / msn: 4509 First flight: 1953 Total airframe hrs: 2498 Engines:Wright R-3350 (972TC18DA1) Crew: Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 10 Passengers: Fatalities: 25 / Occupants: 46 Total: Fatalities: 28 / Occupants: 56 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 2,5 km (1.6 mls) SE off Shannon Airport (SNN) (   Ireland) Phase: Initial climb (ICL) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Shannon Airport (SNN/EINN), Ireland Destination airport: New York-Idlewild International Airport, NY (IDL/KIDL), United States of America Flightnumber: KL633

Narrative:
The KLM Super Constellation, named “Triton”, operated on the Amsterdam-New York route. A scheduled refueling stop was made at Shannon. The flight left Shannon Terminal Building at 02:30 hours at night and taxied to runway 14 (5643 feet long). The before takeoff run-up was completed in takeoff position.
Takeoff was made at 02:38. V1 speed was reached at 3500 feet and lift-off at 125 knots was made just over the V2 speed at approximately 4000 feet from threshold. The flight then passed over the remaining 1600 feet of runway in a shallow climb, retracting its landing gear. The Constellation entered a shallow descent over the River Shannon. The duration of the flight was about 31 seconds from the time it passed over the end of the runway until the aircraft first contacted the water in a tail-down slightly right-wing low attitude. It came to rest on the Middle Ground, a shallow mudbank 8170 feet from the end of the runway, after losing engines no. 3 and 4

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “1) Failure of the captain to correlate and interpret his instrument indications properly during flap retraction, resulting in necessary action not being taken in sufficient time. This failure was partially accounted for by the effect on instrument indications of inadvertent and unexpected gear re-extension. 2) Loss of aircraft performance due to inadvertent landing gear re-extension. 3) The captain failed to maintain sufficient climb to give him an opportunity of meeting unexpected occurrences.”

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UPS Aircraft Rescue Firefighting Guide and Charts

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 09/04/2019 - 08:56
UPS Aircraft Rescue Firefighting Guide and Charts Click on the below link to view the Guide and Charts. “UPS Aircraft Rescue Firefighting Guide and Charts“This post is only available to members.

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Today is Wednesday the 4th of September, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 09/04/2019 - 07:20

One story for today, translated from a Chinese news source, of another close call involving a lithium battery fire on an aircraft…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Passengers in a flight cabin charge self-ignition, China Eastern Airlines: in order to ensure safety has returned to Nanjing

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 09/04/2019 - 07:14

On September 4, some netizens issued a document saying that the cabin of the China Eastern Airlines MU2809 had an open fire after the takeoff. The suspect was caused by the passenger’s illegal use of the charging treasure, and the flight then safely returned to Nanjing Airport.

The netizen broke the photo and showed that there was dust on the plane near the window, and one of the inner walls of the window had been blackened.

According to Fei Changzhun, MU2809 flight from Nanjing to Xiamen, the current state of the flight is returning, the aircraft type is AIRBUSA320-251N NEO, the aircraft is only 0.4 years old. The actual departure time at Nanjing Lukou Airport was 07:16, returning to Nanjing at 8:24.

澎湃News (www.thepaper.cn) reporter learned from Eastern Airlines that today’s Nanjing-Xiamen flight, during the cruise, passengers in the cabin charge self-ignition, the crew will be properly disposed of according to procedures, quickly eliminate safety risks. In order to ensure maximum safety, the crew decided to return to Nanjing. The company actively carried out passenger service guarantee work, arranged flights as soon as possible, and assisted the police in investigating the cause of the incident. The company prompts the majority of passengers to strictly follow the civil aviation safety regulations to carry and use similar equipment.

According to Fei Changzhun, MU2809 flight from Nanjing to Xiamen, the current status of the flight is returning. Screenshot of Fei Changzhan.com In July 2019, the Civil Aviation Administration of China issued the “Notice on Strengthening the Safety Management of Passengers Carrying Lithium Batteries for Short-Haul Transportation of General Aviation” (hereinafter referred to as the “Notice”), stating that according to ICAO “Dangerous Goods Safety” The Technical Regulations for Air Transport stipulate that lithium batteries are classified as Category 9 miscellaneous dangerous goods. Short-distance transportation passengers carry mobile phones, charging treasures, computers, cameras, tablet computers and other electronic devices that contain lithium batteries. When encountering collisions, extrusions, high temperatures, etc. during flight, they are prone to internal short circuit caused by lithium batteries. Smoke, fire, if improperly handled, can cause the general aircraft to lose major safety risks such as load balancing, posing a serious threat to the safe operation of general aviation short-haul transportation.

The “Notice” requires all regional administrations and general airlines to attach great importance to the safety risks of short-distance transport passengers carrying lithium batteries, strengthen the management of risk hazards, formulate corresponding control measures, and carry out self-examination to ensure the continuous safe operation of general aviation short-distance transportation.

http://www.sohu.com/a/338617867_260616

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 09/04/2019 - 07:09

48 Years ago today: On 4 September 1971 an Alaska Airlines Boeing 727 crashed into mountain after premature descent into Juneau, AK, USA killing all 111 occupants.

Date: Saturday 4 September 1971 Time: 12:15 Type: Boeing 727-193 Operator: Alaska Airlines Registration: N2969G C/n / msn: 19304/287 First flight: 1966-06-24 (5 years 2 months) Total airframe hrs: 11344 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7B Crew: Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 104 / Occupants: 104 Total: Fatalities: 111 / Occupants: 111 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 35 km (21.9 mls) W of Juneau, AK (   United States of America) Crash site elevation: 754 m (2474 feet) amsl Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Yakutat Airport, AK (YAK/PAYA), United States of America Destination airport: Juneau International Airport, AK (JNU/PAJN), United States of America Flightnumber: 1866

Narrative:
Alaska Airlines, Flight 1866 (AS66) was a scheduled passenger flight from Anchorage (ANC), to Seattle (SEA), with intermediate stops at Cordova (CDV), Yakutat (YAK), Juneau (JNU), and Sitka (SIT). The IFR flight departed Anchorage at 09:13 and landed at Cordova at 09:42. AS66 departed Cordova at 10:34 after a delay, part of which was attributable to difficulty in securing a cargo compartment door. The flight landed at Yakutat at 11:07. While on the ground, AS66 received an air traffic control clearance to the Juneau Airport via Jet Route 507 to the Pleasant Intersection, direct to Juneau, to maintain 9,000 feet or below until 15 miles southeast of Yakutat on course, then to climb to and maintain FL230. The flight departed Yakutat at 11:35, with 104 passengers and seven crew members on board.
At 11:46, AS66 contacted the Anchorage ARTCC and reported level at FL230, 65 miles east of Yakutat. The flight was then cleared to descend at the pilot’s discretion to maintain 10,000 ft so as to cross the Pleasant Intersection at 10,000 feet and was issued a clearance limit to the Howard Intersection.
The clearance was acknowledged correctly by the captain and the controller provided the Juneau altimeter setting of 29.46 inches and requested AS66 to report leaving 11,000 ft. At 11:51, AS66 reported leaving FL230. Following this report, the flight’s clearance limit was changed to the Pleasant Intersection. At 11:54, the controller instructed AS66 to maintain 12,000 feet. Approximately 1 minute later, the flight reported level at 12,000 feet. The changes to the flight’s original clearance to the Howard Intersection were explained to AS66 by the controller as follows: “I’ve got an airplane that’s not following his clearance, I’ve got to find out where he is.” The controller was referring to N799Y, a Piper Apache which had departed Juneau at 11:44 on an IFR clearance, destination Whitehorse, Canada.
On two separate occasions, AS66 acted as communications relay between the controller and N799Y.
At 11:58, AS66 reported that they were at the Pleasant Intersection, entering the holding pattern, whereupon the controller recleared the flight to Howard Intersection via the Juneau localizer. In response to the controller’s query as to whether the flight was “on top” at 12,000 feet, the captain stated that the flight was “on instruments.” At 12:00, the controller repeated the flight’s clearance to hold at Howard Intersection and issued an expected approach time of 12:10. At 12:01, AS66 reported that they were at Howard, holding 12,000 feet. Six minutes later, AS66 was queried with respect to the flight’s direction of holding and its position in the holding pattern. When the controller was advised that the flight had just completed its inbound turn and was on the localizer, inbound to Howard, he cleared AS66 for a straight-in LDA approach, to cross Howard at or below 9,000 feet inbound. The captain acknowledged the clearance and reported leaving 12,000 feet. At 12:08 the captain reported “leaving five thousand five … four thousand five hundred,” whereupon the controller instructed AS66 to contact Juneau Tower. Contact with the tower was established shortly thereafter when the captain reported, “Alaska sixty-six Barlow inbound.” (Barlow Intersection is located about 10 nautical miles west of the Juneau Airport). The Juneau Tower Controller responded, “Alaska 66, understand, ah, I didn’t, ah, copy the intersection, landing runway 08, the wind 080° at 22 occasional gusts to 28, the altimeter now 29.47, time is 09 1/2, call us by Barlow”. No further communication was heard from the flight.
The Boeing 727 impacted the easterly slope of a canyon in the Chilkat Range of the Tongass National Forest at the 2475-foot level. The aircraft disintegrated on impact

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: PROBABLE CAUSE: “A display of misleading navigational information concerning the flight’s progress along the localizer course which resulted in a premature descent below obstacle clearance altitude. The origin or nature of the misleading navigational information could not be determined. The Board further concludes that the crew did not use all available navigational aids to check the flight’s progress along the localizer nor were these aids required to be used. The crew also did not perform the required audio identification of the pertinent navigational facilities.”

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Seaplane crashes into front yard of home

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 09/03/2019 - 11:59

By Web Staff

INDEPENDENCE TOWNSHIP, MI (WXYZ) — Multiple emergency crews are on scene of a seaplane crash in the yard of a home in Independence Township.

According to the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, the sea plane crashed in a neighborhood on Greenview Dr. near Clarkston Rd. Ater the crash, the plane caught on fire.

Sheriff Mike Bouchard said that the pilot and the passenger were taken to the hospital but appear to have minor injuries, and no one on the ground was injured.

The FAA has been contacted and the sheriff said they will investigate the crash.

https://www.kitv.com/story/40992013/seaplane-crashes-into-front-yard-of-home

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Report: Pilot killed in crop duster crash was Lawrence County airport director

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 09/03/2019 - 11:57

By WAFF 48 Digital Staff

FRANKLIN COUNTY, Ala. (WAFF) – Franklin County deputies confirm a pilot was killed when his crop duster crashed.

The crop duster went down in a cornfield near County Line Road in Russellville between Franklin and Lawrence counties. It happened around 9 a.m. Monday.

The pilot was identified as Anthony Cottingham.

Our news partners at the Decatur Daily report that he was the director of the Lawrence County Airpark in Courtland. Click here to read that story.

Deputies say when they arrived they saw smoke and flames coming from the plane.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.

https://www.wsfa.com/2019/09/02/pilot-killed-crop-duster-crash-franklin-county/

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NTSB Releases Preliminary Report From Michigan Fatal Accident

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 09/03/2019 - 11:55

Aero Commander Was Being Tested Following Maintenance

The NTSB has released a preliminary report from an accident which occurred August 20 that resulted in the fatal injury of two people on board the aircraft. 

According to the report, at about 11:18 EDT, an Aero Commander (Meyers) 200D airplane, N200HS, impacted terrain shortly after departing the Livingston County Spencer J. Hardy Airport (OZW), Howell, Michigan. The pilot and pilot rated passenger received fatal injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Southern Aircraft Consultancy, Inc, Trustee, Norfolk, United Kingdom, and operated by a private individual. VFR conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the  maintenance test flight.

According to initial reports, the airplane had recently undergone maintenance, including the installation of a new field overhauled engine and a 3-bladed propeller. The purpose of the flight was for a maintenance test flight for the airplane. The pilot-rated passenger, seated in the right seat, was also a mechanic who had performed the recent work on the airplane. The pilot, seated in the left seat, owned a similar airplane make and model.

The airplane was flown earlier in the day. The airplane was then fueled with 34.4 gallons of fuel. It is unknown if any adjustments or maintenance items were accomplished before the second flight.

Witnesses reported that the airplane departed runway 13 at OZW; they added that when the airplane was about 200 to 300 ft in the air, the airplane appeared to stop its climb and was silent. One witness reported that it looked like the airplane tried to turn back to the runway, before entering a rapid descent.

The airplane impacted terrain and came to rest about 600 ft beyond the departure end of the runway. The responding Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge, and a technical representative from the engine manufacturer examined the airplane wreckage on site. The examination found the engine air filter element was displaced and in the engine intake tube.

(Images provided with NTSB preliminary report)

FMI: Report

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 09/03/2019 - 11:53

30 Years ago today: On 3 September 1989 a Varig Boeing 737-200 was lost over the Amazon jungle in Brazil and made a forced landing due to fuel exhaustion, killing 13 occupants.

Date: Sunday 3 September 1989 Time: 20:45 Type: Boeing 737-241 Operator: Varig Registration: PP-VMK C/n / msn: 21006/398 First flight: 1975-02-07 (14 years 7 months) Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-17A Crew: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 6 Passengers: Fatalities: 13 / Occupants: 48 Total: Fatalities: 13 / Occupants: 54 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 60 km (37.5 mls) from São José do Xingu, MT (   Brazil) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Marabá Airport, PA (MAB/SBMA), Brazil Destination airport: Belém/Val-de-Cans International Airport, PA (BEL/SBBE), Brazil Flightnumber: RG254

Narrative:
A Varig Boeing 737-200, PP-VMK, was damaged beyond repair in a forced landing in the Amazon jungle in Brazil.
Flight RG254 was a regular domestic service from São Paulo to Belém with an en route stop at Marabá. When the aircraft was preparing for departure at Marabá, the captain inadvertently entered the wrong course, 270 degrees in his Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI). The flight plan called for a course of 027 degrees.
When the copilot returned from the walk-around check, he checked the course on the captain’s HSI and inserted the same course in his HSI.
The flight took off from Marabá at 17:25. The aircraft climbed to FL290 and maintained the 270 radial of Marabá for about forty minutes. The flight was then cleared to descend to FL200 by Belém ACC. However, the crew failed to find navigational aids and lost radio contact.
Course was changed to 090 degrees as the aircraft further descended down to FL40. The crew then followed a river, heading 165 degrees. Because of the sunset and haze the pilot’s had difficulty navigating. Also, they failed to establish radio contact on several frequencies and failed to find navaids in the area. Just after finding two NDB beacons the engines lost power due to fuel shortage. The aircraft lost altitude and the pilots were forced to carry out a landing in the dark and without external references.
At about 20:45 the aircraft made a forced landing in the jungle. The aircraft was located 44 hours after the accident. Forty-one occupants survived and thirteen had sustained fatal injuries in the accident.

It appeared that the computerized flight plan used a four digit representation of the magnetic bearing with the last digit being a tenth of a degree without any decimal separator. A course of ‘027.0’ was presented as ‘0270’.

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Today is Monday the 2nd of September, 2019 “Labor Day”

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/02/2019 - 11:01

Labor Day in the United States is a holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It is a celebration of the American labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.
The equivalent holiday in Canada, Labour Day, is also celebrated on the first Monday of September.

Following are the news stories for today….

Be safe out there!

Tom

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All 9 aboard medical evac plane killed in Philippines crash

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/02/2019 - 10:58

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANILA, PHILIPPINES

All nine people on board a small medical evacuation plane were killed Sunday when the aircraft crashed into a resort area south of the Philippine capital and exploded in flames, officials said. 

The light plane crashed into a resort compound in Pansol village in Laguna province near the foothills of Mount Makiling. Police and rescuers retrieved nine bodies from the wreckage, police said. Two people on the ground were injured and brought to a hospital.

Eric Apolonio, a spokesman of the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines, said the light plane was on a medical evacuation flight from southern Dipolog city in Zamboanga del Norte province and disappeared from radar for unknown reasons as it flew over Laguna, about 60 kilometers (37 miles) south of the capital. The plane was supposed to land in Manila.

The nine on board the plane included two pilots, two nurses, a doctor, a patient, the patient’s wife and two other people, police said.

Videos posted online by witnesses showed flames and black smoke billowing from the private resort compound in Pansol, a district popular for its hot springs and swimming pools. Firefighters and an ambulance can be seen near the scene of the crash as local officials asked villagers to step back to a safe distance.

The crash happened during the monsoon season, when fewer people visit Pansol’s resorts compared to the hot summer months that ended in June.

https://www.heraldonline.com/news/nation-world/world/article234612732.html

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Swedish pilot and five others die in Norway helicopter crash

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/02/2019 - 10:56

A helicopter with a Swedish pilot crashed into the mountains outside Alta in northern Norway and burst into flames on Saturday, killing all six onboard.

The passengers, all of whom were in their early 20s, were on a helicopter ride organised by the Høstsprell music festival.

“What has happened is deeply tragic and we are all in shock,” the festival wrote in a post announcing that concerts would be cancelled on Saturday evening. “The festival management’s thoughts go out to all the relatives.”

Mari Strifeldt Arntzen. a local, told Norway’s VG newspaper that she had been one of the first to report the accident.

“We first saw a lot of black smoke and flames, so we first thought it was a fire. But we got a jolt when we realized what it was and that there were people involved. It’s very sad,” she said.

Witnesses told the local Altaposten newspaper that they had heard five or six small explosions.

Only one of the passengers had been alive at the time rescue services arrived, although they too had died shortly after arriving at hospital in Tromsø, Norwegian police said in a press release on Sunday morning.

Another was initially thought to be missing, but their body was found in the wreckage at 8.40pm.

“The crashed helicopter burned intensely after the accident, and it should be expected that it will take some time to recover and identify the dead,” Gunnar Øvergaard, Operations manager for the local Finnmark police, said in the statement.

“The police have requested assistance from the identification group within Kripos [Norway’s crime investigation body] in this work. They will begin work on Sunday.”

Jonas Beltrame-Linné, a press secretary with the Swedish police, told the Expressennewspaper that the pilot’s relatives had been  informed of his death.

The crash was first reported at around 5pm on Saturday and police found the sixth body at 8.40pm.

Many other festival goers had used the helicopter, which was operated by the company Helitrans, to get to the festival.

“The journey took seven minutes and we felt safe the whole time and felt that the pilot was in control,” Jens Karlsson told the Dagbladet newspaper.

“The helicopter took a tour around central Alta and over a chain of mountains before it landed again.”

“Then we got out and let the next lot of passengers take our places. It was them that crashed. It’s pretty crazy to think about it.”

https://www.thelocal.se/20190901/swedish-pilot-and-five-others-die-in-norway-helicopter-crash

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Pilot, Passenger Escape With Minor Injuries In Crash At Airport In El Monte

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/02/2019 - 10:55

By City News Service

A pilot and his passenger escaped with just minor injuries when their plane crashed as it left the runway Saturday at San Gabriel Valley Airport in El Monte.

Firefighters and paramedics were dispatched to 4233 Santa Anita Ave. at 11:13 a.m., according to a Los Angeles County fire dispatcher.

The two occupants inside the plane were taken to an area hospital with minor injuries, he said.

The aircraft was described as a twin-engine Cessna that crashed into a fence at the end of runway, just as the airplane lost power prior to going airborne.

KNX-1070 reported that the pilot suffered a mild head injury.

https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Pilot-Passenger-Escape-With-Minor-Injuries-In-Crash-At-Airport-In-El-Monte-558963681.html

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Pilot and passenger walk away with minor injuries after plane crashes into pond in Montgomery County

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/02/2019 - 10:53

By Mycah Hatfield

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Texas (KTRK) — Officials are working to determine what caused a plane to crash into a pond in Montgomery County Saturday morning.

Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office responded to reports of a plane crash on Seven Coves Road near FM 2432.

TxDPS tweeted out a photo showing the plane upside down in a body of water.

Officials said the 50-year-old pilot and his passenger were transported to the hospital with minor injuries.

The FAA says they will investigate the crash.

https://abc13.com/pilot-passenger-walk-away-with-minor-injuries-after-plane-crash/5504850/

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Single engine aircraft accident reported at Paso Robles Airport

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 09/02/2019 - 10:52

By News Staff

On Friday, Aug. 30, at approximately 1:47 p.m. the Paso Robles Department of Emergency Servicesresponded to a report of a single engine Piper aircraft that had landed with its landing gear retracted on main runway at the Paso Robles Airport.

First arriving firefighters found the aircraft on the runway with the single occupant out of the aircraft with no reported injuries. The main runway was closed for approximately one hour while crews worked to remove the aircraft.

One engine from Paso Robles responded along with one Cal Fire unit and the city’s airport manager. The cause of the accident was unknown at the time of this report.

https://pasoroblesdailynews.com/single-engine-aircraft-accident-reported-at-paso-robles-airport/97880/

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