ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Pilot That Landed Small Plane in South Kingstown Neighborhood Identified

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 07/08/2019 - 12:09

Willord Burke, 25, from Springfield Massachusetts has been identified as the pilot, according to Rhode Island State Police.

By Brooke Taylor

Willord Burke, 25, from Springfield Massachusetts has been identified as the pilot that made an emergency landing in South Kingstown, according to Rhode Island State Police.

Dense fog caused a pilot to make an emergency landing on Shannon Rd. in South Kingstown around 5 p.m., according to the South Kingstown Police Department.

The Piper PA-25, which flies advertisment banners, was supposed to land at Westerly State Airport. After circling the area for several minutes, the pilot landed on Peggy Doyle’s front yard on Shannon Rd.

“I was hollering at the kids, keep your eyes on that plane and stay clear,” Peggy Doyle said. “We are very lucky because the plane landed. The pilot did a great job.”

The pilot had no injuries and refused medical treatment.

Along with the South Kingstown Police Department, members of the Union Fire Direct and South Kingstown Emergency Medical Services also assisted. The FAA has assumed the lead in the investigation.

_________________________________________________

South Kingstown (R.I):  A small plane landed in the front yard of a home on Succotash Rd in South Kingstown, on Saturday evening.

South Kingstown Police are unable to comment on the cause or if there were any injuries.

https://www.abc6.com/story/40750309/small-plane-lands-in-south-kingstown-neighborhood

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Pilot airlifted after small aircraft crash at Bay City airport

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 07/08/2019 - 12:06

By Stephen Borowy

The investigation continues after a plane went down, and the pilot was taken to the hospital.

The Bay City Public Safety Department was called to James Clements Airport on Saturday, July 6th at 8:38 p.m. for reports of a plane that went down.

When officers arrived they found a small, single-engine aircraft with heavy damage and leaking fuel.

The pilot, a 27-year-old Arkansas man, was conscious, but had possible life-threatening injuries.

He was extracted from the plane using the Jaws of Life and taken via helicopter to Covenant Hospital.

The airport will be temporarily closed until investigators from the FAA and NTSB arrive.

The pilot’s name has not yet been released.

https://www.wnem.com/news/pilot-airlifted-after-small-aircraft-crash-at-bay-city-airport/article_54766014-a058-11e9-aca1-1bb3cf5b0302.html

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65-year-old pilot killed in Rankin County glider crash

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 07/08/2019 - 12:04

By China Lee

RANKIN COUNTY, Miss. (WLBT) – One person has died after an airplane glider crashed in Rankin County.

It happened Saturday afternoon near Kitty Hawk Circle in northern Rankin County.

According to Sheriff Bryan Bailey initial reports said that plane had gone down behind houses and that the pilot inside was entrapped.

When deputies arrived on scene they found that the pilot was deceased.

He has been identified as 65-year-old James Gately from Covington, Louisiana.

The NTSB is taking over the investigation.

https://www.wlbt.com/2019/07/06/pilot-killed-rankin-county-glider-crash/

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4 escape injury when aircraft goes off runway, submerges in Lake Aeroflex

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 07/08/2019 - 12:01

By Lori Comstock New Jersey Herald

ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — Four people escaped injury this afternoon when the aircraft they were in plunged into Lake Aeroflex after it went off the runway upon landing at Aeroflex-Andover Airport, according to officials.

The incident involving a Cessna C172 occurred around 12:30 p.m., according to Andover Township Police Chief Eric Danielson.

Danielson said the pilot failed to correctly estimate the length of the Aeroflex airport runway and the aircraft ran off of it and ended up in the lake. A former Andover Township firefighter, whose name was not released, was fishing and helped the occupants of the plane escape before it submerged, Danielson said.

The names of the occupants were not identified, but all four refused medical treatment at the scene.

Danielson said the two adults and two children were traveling from Harrisburg, Pa., to Morristown when their flight was diverted to the Andover airport because of a temporary flight restriction due to the arrival of President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump. According to White House pool reports, Air Force One arrived at Morristown Municipal Airport at 12:13 p.m. The Marine One helicopter then lifted off at 12:27 p.m. to take Trump to his golf club in Bedminster.

Danielson said unlike the crash that occurred in April 2018 when a plane submerged about 80 feet in the middle of the 119-acre lake, today’s plane was closer to land and sank about 18 to 24 feet.

Dive teams with the New Jersey State Police T.E.A.M.S. unit are using airbags to float the plane to the surface before it will be lifted out by a crane from D&E Service, Danielson said.

Assisting at the scene are the Andover police and fire departments, Lakeland Emergency Squad, the New Jersey Forest Fire Service and the New Jersey State Park Police.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating, according to a spokesman.

https://www.njherald.com/20190705/four-escape-injury-when-aircraft-goes-off-runway-submerges-in-lake-aeroflex

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Emergency crews on scene of a small plane crash near Chebanse

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 07/08/2019 - 11:58

Emergency crews responded to the scene of a single-engine airplane crash Friday afternoon. According to reports, the plane crashed into a wheat field at 1861 E 3300 North at Chebanse.

At 1:58 p.m. Iroquois County Sheriff’s Police, along with Chebanse Township Fire, Otto Township Fire, Beaverville Fire, Aroma Park Fire and Riverside EMS were dispatched to rural Chebanse in reference to a plane crash with injuries. According to police reports the plane crashed carrying three occupants.

Upon arrival of EMS the occupants were transported to Riverside Hospital and St. Mary’s Hospital in Kankakee. The extent of the injuries was unknown as of press time.

The crash scene is under investigation with the Iroquois County Sheriff’s Department and the Federal Aviation Administration.

The Illinois State Police also assisted with the scene.

http://www.newsbug.info/iroquois_countys_times-republic/updated-emergency-crews-on-scene-of-a-small-plane-crash/article_fa3dd18e-46e8-567a-8646-dad66d7153b3.html

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 07/08/2019 - 11:55

54 Years ago today: On 8 July 1965 a Canadian Pacific Air Lines Douglas DC-6B crashed near Dog Creek following an on board explosion, killing all 52 occupants.

Date: Thursday 8 July 1965 Time: 15:41 Type: Douglas DC-6B Operator: Canadian Pacific Air Lines – CPAL Registration: CF-CUQ C/n / msn: 43844/334 First flight: 1953 Total airframe hrs: 29998 Engines:Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Crew: Fatalities: 6 / Occupants: 6 Passengers: Fatalities: 46 / Occupants: 46 Total: Fatalities: 52 / Occupants: 52 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 32 km (20 mls) W of 100 Mile House, BC (   Canada) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Vancouver International Airport, BC (YVR/CYVR), Canada Destination airport: Prince George Airport, BC (YXS/CYXS), Canada Flightnumber: 21

Narrative:
Canadian Pacific Flight 21 was a domestic flight from Vancouver (YVR) to Whitehorse (YXY) via Prince George (YXS), Fort St . John (YXJ), Fort Nelson (YYE) and Watson Lake (YQH) in Canada.
At 14:42, the DC-6B “Empress of Buenos Aires” took off on an instrument flight plan for Prince George, via Victor 300 and Blue 22 airways.
En route, at 15:29 the crew reported to Vancouver ATC Centre that they had passed Ashcroft at 16,000 feet. They were estimating William Lake at 15:48. At 15:38 hours, Vancouver Centre called Flight 21 and did not receive a reply. About two minutes later, three “Mayday” calls were heard by Vancouver Centre. An explosion had occurred in the left aft lavatory. Smoke trailed the aircraft and the tail separated from the fuselage. The main portion of the wreckage assumed a nose down attitude and spiralled to the left until it crashed into a wooded area

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “Explosion of a device which resulted in aerial disintegration.”

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Today is Friday the 5th of July, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 12:45

I hope everyone survived the 4th with all digits attached! 

Today is Day 1 of the 2019 IBARFF Cruise. Started off with a bang at the hotel this morning with a fire in the hotel kitchen. Our community was well represented as Retired Chiefs Kreckie and Nilo kept the throngs of traumatized guests under control outside the building while Retired Lt. Wagner was at the seat of the fire in the kitchen. We’re still working on finding Retired Chief Stewart….

Due to limited access to the internet during the cruise, there may be a few days next week when I won’t be able to put out a report. We’ll see how it goes…

So now as we head off for the ship, we close this week with the following stories…

Have a great weekend and be safe out there!

Tom

 

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Small plane crashes in Carroll County, no life-threatening injuries

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:34

A small plane, carrying four people on board, crashed in Carroll County Thursday afternoon.

By: Zac Carlisle

VAIDEN, Miss. (WTVA) – A small plane, carrying four people on board, crashed in Carroll County Thursday afternoon.

Minor and non-life-threatening injuries were reported, according to the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department.

Emergency responders rushed to the scene at approximately 2 p.m. in the Vaiden area.

Two adults and two children occupied the single-engine plane, reports the sheriff’s department.

The pilot was transported from the scene with non-life-threatening injuries, and the three other occupants were transported to a local hospital with minor injuries, according to the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department.

The sheriff’s department reports the plane departed from a Winona airport and was trying to land on a private airstrip when the crash happened.

The crash is under investigation.

https://www.wtva.com/content/news/Small-plane-crashes-in-Carroll-County-no-life-threatening-injuries–512232862.html

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HPD helicopter crashes and lands on its side at Hobby Airport after patrol flight

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:33

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — Investigators are working to learn what caused a Houston Police Department helicopter to crash at Hobby Airport.
It happened around 8:45 p.m. Thursday after finishing a patrol flight. 

HPD says the pilot and pilot trainee who were inside the helicopter are OK, but are very shaken up.

Homeland Security Command Houston Police Department Asst. Chief Larry Satterwhite said the helicopter turned on its side.

“As they were about to land, something went wrong and the helicopter rolled on its side, severely damaging the aircraft,” Satterwhite said.

HPD says they are working to learn more about what happened.

“If there’s something wrong with the aircraft, something we need to do to make sure this doesn’t happen again, we’ll do that,” Satterwhite said.

Houston police, the NTSB and FAA are investigating.

https://abc13.com/hpd-aircraft-makes-hard-landing-after-fuel-spill/5379370/

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Us Billionaire Among Seven Dead In Helicopter Crash Off Abaco

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:31

By AVA TURNQUEST and DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Staff

A helicopter crash off Grand Cay, Abaco claimed the life of billionaire coal tycoon Chris Cline, his daughter and five other people yesterday.

Mr Cline died a day before his 61st birthday after their helicopter crashed as it was flying back to the United States,

Close family friend West Virginia Governor Jim Justice confirmed the deaths in a series of tweets yesterday evening following reports that seven Americans had been found in a submerged helicopter some two miles offshore.

According to police, the helicopter (N32DCC) took off from Big Grand Cay around 2am yesterday, on its way to Florida.

“The aircraft was reported missing to the Royal Bahamas Police Force at about 2.53pm on Thursday after it did not arrive at the intended destination,” the police statement read.

The helicopter was found overturned in 16 feet of water, off Grand Cay.

Other victims were identified as David Jude, two young adults from Beckley, West Virginia, unidentified friends and an unidentified helicopter mechanic from Florida, according to the Register-Herald, a West Virginia newspaper.

Tourism and Aviation Minister Dionisio D’Aguilar told The Tribune the incident happened around 2am yesterday, however local officials did not release information until last evening.

“It’s all very scant,” he said when asked about the reporting delay.

Mr D’Aguilar continued: “I’m sure the police will provide that information. I was advised it happened early this morning (Thursday). What then transpired from then and where we are now is still under investigation.”

Tributes poured in on social media for the seven passengers who perished in the crash, with many expressing shock and heartbreak over the tragedy.

The aircraft was headed to Fort Lauderdale with four women and three men, according to police.

“Today we lost a WV superstar,” Mr Justice’s tweet read. “Our families go back to the beginning of the Cline empire – Pioneer Fuel. Chris Cline built an empire and on every occasion was always there to give. What a wonderful, loving and giving man.”

US Senator Sue Cline wrote: “Prayers for family and friends of my great friend Chris Cline and his daughter Cameron and her dear friends who we loss (sic) today in a helicopter crash. Chris was (an) exceptional human being and we all loved him so much. Such a loss for all seven aboard today. Our hearts are broken.”

Beckley Mayor Rob Rappold told the Register-Herald: “Words can’t express the absolute sorrow and disbelief. Southern West Virginia was Chris’ love and his legacy of compassion and giving back will last for ever.”

The helicopter was found two miles offshore, according to police.

The Air Accident Investigation Department will head to Grand Cay this morning to begin investigations, according to Chief Investigator Delvin Major.

He said the department was notified of the incident sometime after 4pm

“We do not know the time when it happened, a lot of information is going around. We cannot say that, we are the investigators, we can’t speculate. The timeline is still unclear,” Mr Major said.

http://www.tribune242.com/news/2019/jul/05/US-billionaire-among-seven-dead/

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Pilot Unhurt As Plane Slides Off Runway At Centennial Airport

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:30

By Ben Warwick

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (CBS4) – A twin-engine plane slid off the runway at Centennial Airport Wednesday. No one was hurt.

The call came in just before noon. The plane had one person on board, but no fuel leaked from the aircraft.

The runway was closed and the pilot worked with airport crews to right the plane and get it off the runway. It reopened shortly thereafter.

https://denver.cbslocal.com/2019/07/03/centennial-airport-plane-slideoff/

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Plane lands on Waikoloa Road; no injuries

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:27

By West Hawaii Today

KAILUA-KONA — Waikoloa Road between Queen Kaahumanu Highway and Waikoloa Village reopened after crews removed a small aircraft that made an emergency landing earlier today.

It’s was closed for about an hour.

A small aircraft made an emergency landing on the road around 10:30 this morning. Hawaii Police said no injuries were reported near mile marker 4 after the single-engine Cessna 206 Stationair, owned by William Aerial &Mapping, made an emergency landing after losing power.

Mike Hillestad was driving to work when he noticed the plane flying low, appearing as though it were ready to land. The craft’s shadow covered his car as he headed south with his 5-year-old daughter.

“The shadow was so big, I knew something was going on,” he said.

He watched as the plane landed on clear roadway ahead of him. Then the craft’s wing clipped a road sign and pulled the airplane down what Hillestad estimated was a 25-foot embankment.

Hillestad said he and around 20 other people pulled over and helped the young pilot, described as in his 30s, and the passenger, described as in his 20s, out of the craft.

“To be honest, they were pretty speechless, they were in shock,” Hillestad said of the occupants.

The pilot and co-pilot were the only occupants and uninjured during the emergency landing, according to police.

The Federal Aviation Administration in Honolulu said it received word of the incident but couldn’t comment Tuesday.

Eric Gomez of William Aerial &Mapping said he couldn’t provide any additional details of the incident as he was waiting to get in touch with the pilots.

https://www.westhawaiitoday.com/2019/07/03/hawaii-news/plane-makes-emergency-landing-on-waikoloa-road-no-injuries-reported/

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Three taken to the hospital after Montville plane crash

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:26

By Brianna Bires

MONTVILLE, Maine (WABI) – A plane crashed in Montville Wednesday evening.

Officials say the single-engine plane went down in the woods of Hidden Valley Camp.

Three people were on board.

The owner of the camp, Peter Kassen tells us the plane was rented by the camp and two of their employees were on board.

Kassen says the camp hired a private pilot to fly the plane.

“There was 3 people on board they were all transported. There were no fatalities and we’re not sure about the injuries but they seem to be up and walking around and doing okay,” said Montville Public Information Officer, Karen York

No word yet as to why the plane crashed.

The crash is currently under investigation.

https://www.wabi.tv/content/news/Three-taken-to-the-hospital-after-plane-crash-in-Montville-512195482.html

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Pilot hurt in emergency landing of vintage plane in Gatineau

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:24

JACOB HOYTEMA

One of Canada’s most revered pilots was injured when his vintage aircraft was forced to make an emergency landing at Gatineau Executive Airport at about midday Wednesday.

John Aitken, a veteran fighter pilot of the RCAF and former head of the test flight program for the NRC, is in the hospital following the incident.

“As far as we’re being told, he’ll be recovering for a bit but he’ll be at 100 per cent at some point in the future,” said Ottawa businessman and aircraft enthusiast Michael Potter, who owns the crashed plane. Potter said Aitken has a broken rib and a broken nose.

Aitken was piloting the Robert Hampton Gray Goodyear FG-1D Corsair, a craft which saw action in the Second World War and the Korean War. Aitken was in the air for about a 30-minute flight as he had planned to do, but some unknown circumstance caused the plane to go off the runway during landing, Potter said.

The fire department happened to be on scene for training at the time of the crash, and Potter said firefighters were “magnificent” in rushing to Aitken’s aid.

Potter said that he didn’t know the exact nature of the damage to the plane, because at the time of writing a few hours after the incident, protocol deems it too dangerous to approach the downed craft.

Paul Tremblay, the chief mechanic at Vintage Wings of Canada, the historical society that keeps and showcases a number of former warplanes at the airport, said he’s sure that “we’ll definitely be able to get it going again.”

But the damage is enough to keep the plane from attending the Thunder over Michigan air show in August, which had 10 of the extremely rare Corsairs lined up to attend.

“It’s going to be the biggest gathering of Corsairs in years,” said Tremblay. “Maybe next year.”

Aitken, who flew CF-18s with the RCAF, is a holder of the McKee Trophy, which is awarded for outstanding achievement in aviation. “He’s one of the most acclaimed pilots in Canada today,” Potter said.

“He should end up in the Aviation Hall of Fame. That’s what kind of an aviator he is,” Tremblay said.

With files from Norm Provencher.

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/pilot-seriously-hurt-in-emergency-landing-of-vintage-plane-in-gatineau

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Virgin Atlantic Flight Makes Emergency Landing After Cabin Fire

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:22

By RICH THOMASELLI

For the second time in less than a day, a plane was forced to make an emergency landing at Boston’s Logan International Airport.

A Virgin Atlantic flight was diverted to Boston on Thursday when a fire broke out in the cabin, believed to have been caused by a mobile phone battery charger.

The flight was traveling from New York to London.

The plane landed safely and all 217 passengers were quickly evacuated without harm, although one passenger declined to be treated for what was described as a “smoke related complaint.”

Bomb disposal officers who boarded the aircraft after the passengers evacuated quickly found the culprit between seat cushions.

“Preliminary investigation suggests it is a battery pack consistent in appearance with an external phone charger,” a police spokesman told reporters.

But one passenger told the British Broadcasting Corporation that she was speaking with the person whose seat caught fire and didn’t believe that was the case.

“It took about two minutes to put it out,” she said.

In a statement, Virgin Atlantic would only say the flight was diverted “due to reports of smoke in the cabin. Our crew responded immediately and the plane has landed safely.”

It is the second time in less than 24 hours that a plane needed to make an emergency landing at Logan. Earlier Thursday, an American Airlines flight en route from Chicago was able to complete its scheduled flight to Boston but passengers were told there was a mechanical issue with the wing flaps upon descent, forcing an emergency landing.

The plane landed safely and all passengers and crew were unharmed.

https://www.travelpulse.com/news/airlines/virgin-atlantic-flight-makes-emergency-landing-after-cabin-fire.html

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NTSB: Cessna Down In FL Had Not Refueled Before Accident

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:07

Preliminary Report Released From June 12 Mishap

The NTSB has released its preliminary report from an accident which occurred on June 12, 2019 at about 1100 eastern daylight time. The Cessna 182E, N3051Y, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Maitland, FL. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. VFR conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Executive Airport (KORL), Orlando, FL about 1055 enroute to Massey Ranch Airpark (X50), New Smyrna, FL. The airplane was owned and operated by Golden Corner Flying Club. 

Earlier on the day of the accident, the pilot and passenger flew the airplane from Oconee County Regional Airport (KCEU), Clemson, South Carolina, to KORL. A fuel receipt revealed that the pilot purchased 21.1 gallons of fuel prior to departing KCEU. The flight plan that was filed indicated that the airplane departed KCEU with 4 hours of fuel on board. According to radar data obtained from the FAA, the flight from KCEU to KORL took about 3.10 hours. The pilot did not purchase fuel at KORL before departing for X50.

According to preliminary air traffic control radio communication information provided by the FAA, the pilot declared an emergency at 1059 to Central Florida Terminal Radar Approach Control and stated that the airplane was not getting fuel out of the right tank. The pilot asked for the closest airport to land and the controller told him that ORL was the closest airport. The controller cleared him to land and advised the pilot he was cleared to make a left or right turn back to the airport and to switch radio frequency back to the tower controller at ORL. The pilot also reported to the tower controller that the airplane was not getting fuel out of the right tank. The controller cleared him to land on runway 13, but the pilot did not respond, and no further communications were received from the accident airplane.

A witness stated that he was in a boat on the northeast side of Lake Maitland when he heard and saw an airplane flying overhead. The engine was sputtering “like it was running out of gas.” He watched the airplane fly over the lake to the north, make a 180° turn back to the lake, and thought the pilot was trying to make a water landing. The witness was in the path of the airplane, so he started the boat motor and drove perpendicular to the airplane’s path to stay out of the way. The witness further stated it looked like the airplane may have hit some treetops at the edge of the water because the airplane drastically nosed over and went straight into the water and hit “very hard.” He immediately went over to the airplane, which was still on top of the water; however, it quickly sank.

The airplane was located about 5 miles north of KORL in Lake Maitland, at a depth of 20 ft. Two gallons of fuel was removed from each wing tank and the single auxiliary tank. The left wing remained attached to the airframe. The flap and aileron were still attached to the wing. The fuel tank was intact and not breached. The fueling cap was attached and secured to the fuel tank. The fuselage was intact and not damaged. The rudder, elevator and vertical stabilizer were attached and not damaged. The right wing remained attached to the airframe. The flap and aileron were still attached to the wing. The fuel tank was intact and not breached. The fueling cap was attached and secured to the fuel tank. The main landing gear was attached and not damaged. Both doors were attached and not damaged.

The instrument panel was intact; however, the panel was separated from its mounts. The throttle, mixture, and propeller controls were all in the most forward position. The fuel selector valve was in the right tank position. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was in the off position. The lap belts and shoulder harnesses remained attached. The propeller was attached to the engine; one blade was bent forward, the second blade tip was bent, and the third blade was straight. The bottom engine cowl was crushed consistent with impact damage. The muffler and airbox were crushed. The top engine cowling was not damaged. The engine remained attached to the engine mounts and was not damaged. Flight control continuity was established to all flight controls by moving the control wheel and rudder pedals to verify movement.

The airplane was recovered to a salvage facility and secured to a trailer in preparation for an engine run. The magnetos were dried out and the carburetor and spark plugs were cleaned of water. The aviation fuel that was removed from the airplane was separated from the water and used to start the engine. The engine started without hesitation and ran continuously for about 3 minutes at different power settings.

The four-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was built in 1962, and powered by a 375-horsepower Continental O-520-series engine, equipped with a three-blade, constant speed Hartzell propeller. The most recent annual inspection was completed on April 4, 2019. Review of maintenance records revealed that at the time of the most recent annual inspection, the airframe total time was 5,835.49 hours, and the engine time was 1,578.69 hours since major overhaul.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second class medical certificate was issued on October 1, 2018. He reported 1,000 total hours of flight experience at that time.

(Source: NTSB. Image from file. Not accident airplane)

FMI: www.ntsb.org

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 07/05/2019 - 11:05

49 Years ago today: On 5 July 1970 an Air Canada McDonnell Douglas DC-8-63 crashed near Toronto, killing all 109 occupants.

Date: Sunday 5 July 1970 Time: 08:09 Type: McDonnell Douglas DC-8-63 Operator: Air Canada Registration: CF-TIW C/n / msn: 46114/526 First flight: 1970 Total airframe hrs: 453 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT3D-7 Crew: Fatalities: 9 / Occupants: 9 Passengers: Fatalities: 100 / Occupants: 100 Total: Fatalities: 109 / Occupants: 109 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 11 km (6.9 mls) N of Toronto International Airport, ON (YYZ) (   Canada) Phase: Landing (LDG) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Montreal-Dorval International Airport, QC (YUL/CYUL), Canada Destination airport: Toronto International Airport, ON (YYZ/CYYZ), Canada Flightnumber: 621

Narrative:
Air Canada flight 621 was a routine early morning flight originating from Montreal-Dorval International Airport, QC (YUL), with destination Toronto International Airport, ON (YYZ). The DC-8-63 plane, a relatively new airplane which had been delivered just over two months ago, departed at 07:17 for a flight which was to take just over 50 minutes. The captain was pilot flying. The enroute and descent portion of the flight were uneventful. At a distance of 8 miles from Toronto Airport, about 08:02, the “Before-Landing Check” was made. This included the lowering of the undercarriage and according to Air Canada procedures should include arming the spoilers. This item however was intentionally omitted. On previous flights were the captain and first officer had flown together they had disagreed on when to arm the spoilers. Both men did not like to arm the spoilers at the beginning of the final approach, fearing that this increased the chance of inadvertent spoiler activation. The captain preferred to arm the spoilers on the flare, while the first officer preferred to arm and extend them on the ground. Although both procedures where contrary to company policy, it was agreed between them that when the captain was flying the aircraft, the first officer would cause the spoilers to be extended on the ground, and when the first officer was flying the captain would arm the spoilers on the flare.
However on this particular occasion, the captain and first officer had a discussion about when the spoilers should be armed. The captain finally ordered: “All right, give them to me on the flare”, which was contrary to their personal agreement on previous flights.
Power was reduced then on the aircraft for the purpose of the flare and the captain gave the order to the first officer by saying “O.K.”; and immediately thereafter the ground spoilers were deployed. The aircraft was about 60 feet above runway 32 at that time and began to sink rapidly. The captain immediately noticed what had happened, applied full throttle to all four engines and pulled back the control column. The nose came up as the aircraft continued to sink. Realizing what he had done, the first officer apologized to the captain. The plane than struck the runway heavily, causing the number 4 engine and pylon to separate from the wing. It fell on the runway along with a piece of the lower wing plating, allowing fuel to escape and subsequently ignite. The DC-8 rose back into the air, at which time the ground spoilers retracted, and climbed to an altitude of 3100 feet. During this climb, fire and smoke were seen trailing behind the aircraft intermittently. The crew wanted to circle for an emergency landing on runway 32. This was not possible because of debris on the runway, so the controller suggested a landing on runway 23. About two and a half minutes after the initial touchdown an explosion occurred in the right wing outboard of the number 4 engine location causing parts of the outer wing structure to fall free to the ground. Six seconds later, a second explosion occurred in the vicinity of number 3 engine and the engine with its pylon ripped free of the wing and fell to the ground in flames. Six and one half seconds later, a third explosion occurred which caused the loss of a large section of the right wing, including the wing tip. The airplane then went into a violent manoeuvre, lost height rapidly and at the same time more wing plating tore free following which the DC-8 struck the ground at a high velocity, about 220 knots in a left wing high and nose low attitude

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: The Canadian investigation report did not conform to ICAO standards and did not contain a probable cause as such.

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Today is Wednesday, the 3rd of July, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 07/03/2019 - 09:20

The day before my favorite U.S holiday, the 4th of July! 

The 4th of July is Independence Day in the United States and is a federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, which was the date the United States formally declared their independence from Great Britain in order to achieve freedom from British rule.

I wish everyone a safe and enjoyable Independence Day! We all know what goes on when celebrating the 4th of July, beers, BBQ’s and fireworks, so I really mean it when I say “BE SAFE OUT THERE”, don’t blow off any appendages, and may we all remember those who are away from family, standing a post, whether in the Military or as a First Responder protecting and watching over us!

For all those Brothers and Sisters traveling to Seattle for the big IBARFF cruise this week, safe travels, I look forward to seeing you all!!!

Now here are the stories for today…

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Homemade plane crashes in Chesterfield, leaving pilot with serious injuries

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 07/03/2019 - 09:06

From staff reports

A Midlothian man was seriously injured Tuesday night when a small, single-engine homemade plane went off the runway and overturned at the Chesterfield County Airport.

According to Virginia State Police, the plane was taxiing on the runway about 8:40 p.m. when it inadvertently left the ground, came back down and skidded off the runway.

The plane then overturned, trapping the pilot

The pilot was taken to the hospital with serious injuries. The police did not release his name but said he is 69 years old and from Midlothian.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the crash, which remains under investigation. State police said Chesterfield Fire & EMS, Chesterfield police and airport police assisted at the scene.

The airport is at 7511 Airfield Drive, northwest of the interchange for state Route 288 and Iron Bridge Road.

https://www.richmond.com/news/local/crime/homemade-plane-crashes-in-chesterfield-leaving-pilot-with-serious-injuries/article_9c91630a-c883-5874-ab83-a85d11c1971b.html

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NTSB: Crew discussed engine trouble before deadly plane crash bound for St. Petersburg

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 07/03/2019 - 09:04

By: Jake Bleiberg and David Koenig, AP

DALLAS (AP) — Seconds before a small plane crashed at a suburban Dallas airport, killing all 10 people on board, the crew commented on a problem with the left engine, federal officials said Tuesday.

The Beechcraft BE-350 King Air struggled to gain altitude before veering to the left and crashing into a hangar at the Addison Municipal Airport on Sunday morning, killing the two crew members and eight passengers, witnesses and authorities said.

Bruce Landsberg, the vice chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, said at a Tuesday news conference that the pilot comments were heard on the cockpit voice recorder, which was recovered from the charred wreckage. He said the crew was cleared for takeoff about a minute before the recording ended.

The recording captured apparent confusion in the cockpit as the plane headed down the runway, Landsberg said. Four seconds later, the pilots indicated there was a problem with the left engine. After another five seconds, three alarms sounded, warning pilots that the plane was banked too sharply to one side, he said. The recording ended moments later.

Technical experts will review the recording in Washington and produce a transcript, which the NTSB will release along with other reports from its investigation, Landsberg said.

NTSB investigators said they don’t know yet if the captain or co-pilot was flying the plane. The board is reviewing records for both, including their recent flights. The NTSB interviewed a pilot who flew with the captain several weeks ago and reported nothing unusual, officials said.

Eight of the 10 people who were killed have been identified. Dallas County officials confirmed 52-year-old Brian Mark Ellard, 58-year-old Stephen Lee Thelen, 28-year-old Matthew Palmer, 15-year-old Alice Maritato and 13-year-old Dylan Maritato were among the dead.

The Catholic Diocese of Dallas said Ornella Ellard was also killed. She was married to Brian Ellard and was the mother of Alice and Dylan Maritato.

Jinky Hicks, the presiding director of Tennis Competitors of Dallas, said a league director, Mary Titus, and her husband, John, were among the passengers who died. She said five other members of the tennis organization were also on the plane, which was headed to St. Petersburg, Florida.

The private plane was not required to have a flight data recorder, which tracks the performance of virtually every system on board. Federal investigators will rely on physical evidence at the crash site, video, radar information and witness accounts to determine the cause of the crash.

Officials had indicated that the plane was almost completely destroyed in the fire, but they said Tuesday that they’ll be able to analyze significant parts.

Lead NTSB investigator Jennifer Rodi said both engines and their propeller assemblies were recovered Monday and were being dissembled for closer examination. She said the main part of the fuselage was destroyed but a piece of the tail assembly “larger than I am” survived. She said investigators will try to piece together, like a puzzle, parts of the wings.

Investigators have video from four cameras, including two positioned at the end of the runway.

The NTSB said the airplane had been topped off with fuel before takeoff. The crash created a plume of thick, black smoke.

NTSB officials said they expect to wrap up their work at the crash site Wednesday afternoon. Investigators continued to scour the airport Tuesday as Addison prepares for its Independence Day fireworks display and airshow.

The damaged hangar is “well beyond the fallout area” of the Wednesday night pyrotechnics, said town spokeswoman Mary Rosenbleeth.

The event will include a message of thanks to the police and firefighters who responded to the crash and a moment of silence to recognize the victims, Rosenbleeth said.

https://www.abcactionnews.com/news/region-pinellas/ntsb-crew-discussed-engine-trouble-before-deadly-plane-crash-bound-for-st-petersburg

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