ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Today is Friday the 23rd of June, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:51

We end this week with the following few stories.

Everyone have a great weekend and be safe out there!

Tom

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Two Dead, one Injured in Helicopter Crash in Schinias Wetland, Greece

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:49

A private company’s spray helicopter crashed just before 10 a.m. on Friday morning in the wetland of Schinias, eastern Attica region, Greece.

Attica vice governor Petros Filippou said to Athens Macedonian News Agency that the pilot of the helicopter and a wetland guard were killed while the third passenger, a university student, was injured.

Filippou said that when the helicopter completed the aerial spraying against mosquitoes, the pilot took on board the student and the guard to fly with him over the wetland, however, the helicopter hit barbed wire fence and crashed.
(Source: ANA-MPA)

The helicopter crash in Schinias was streamed live on Facebook:

http://greece.greekreporter.com/2017/06/23/two-dead-one-injured-in-helicopter-crash-in-schinias-wetland/

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KLM aircraft hit by lightning at Amsterdam airport gate

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:47
Date: 22-JUN-2017 Time: ca 17:00 Type: Boeing 737-8K2 (WL) Owner/operator: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Registration: PH-BXA C/n / msn: 29131/198 Fatalities: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: Other fatalities: 0 Airplane damage: Unknown Location: Amsterdam-Schiphol International Airport (AMS/EHAM) –    Netherlands Phase: Standing Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Amsterdam-Schiphol International Airport (AMS/EHAM) Destination airport: Manchester International Airport (MAN/EGCC)

Narrative:
KLM flight KL1093 to Manchester was parked at the gate at Amsterdam-Schiphol International Airport, Netherlands when it was reportedly hit by lightning.
Smoke is said to have developed in the cabin and cockpit, forcing passengers already on board, to deplane.

Weather at the airport
EHAM 221525Z 24010KT 210V270 9999 FEW008 FEW070CB 19/18 Q1009 RETSRA TEMPO BKN012
>> EHAM 221455Z 21014KT 180V250 1700 R18C/1400D R27/1800N R18R/1900N R06/P2000N +TSRA FEW009 BKN070CB 18/18 Q1010 BECMG FM1520 9999 NSW
EHAM 221425Z 20006KT 170V230 9999 -SHRA FEW025 FEW070CB 20/18 Q1008 RETSRA TEMPO 26020G30KT 4000 TSRA
EHAM 221355Z 27010KT 220V300 9999 -SHRA SCT070CB 21/16 Q1009 TEMPO 26020G30KT 4000 TSRA

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Boom Announces Orders for 76 of its Supersonic Transports

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:44

First flight of the new SST planned for late 2018.

The Boom supersonic transport moved another step closer to reality this week when CEO Blake Scholl announced 76 firm orders at the Paris Air Show for the as yet unproven aircraft. While customer identities have not been revealed, except for the Virgin Group, the remaining four are believed to be airlines. Billionaire Richard Branson holds a significant stake in Boom.

The Baby Boom, the 1/3rd scale prototype, also this week successfully completed a preliminary design review at Boom’s Denver-area manufacturing facility. If the new SST successfully enters service in 2023 as planned, it will carry as many as 55 passengers 4,400 nm at speeds of Mach 2.2. The tri-engine Boom will make over-water routes such as Los Angeles-Sydney and Seattle Shanghai possible, shaving many hours from the routes currently flown using sub-sonic aircraft.

Scholl said orders for the initial aircraft are backed by cash deposits creating enough liquidity to continue development of the Baby Boom through its first flight scheduled for late 2018. Supersonic testing of the Baby Boom will later take place at Edwards AFB California.

Although the FAA bans supersonic flight over the Continental U.S., Scholl believes there are as many as 500 city pairs connected by water that will make the aircraft a success. He believes the airplane’s sonic boom, some 30 times quieter than that of the Concorde, could go a long way toward convincing the FAA to relax the supersonic ban.

Scholl expects a business-class ticket on the Boom to cost about $5,000. The price of the aircraft itself is currently listed at approximately $200 million per copy.

http://www.flyingmag.com/boom-announces-orders-for-76-its-supersonic-transports?cmpid=enews062217&spPodID=030&spMailingID=29496790&spUserID=NDc4NjIzMTc3MwS2&spJobID=1062843380&spReportId=MTA2Mjg0MzM4MAS2

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:43

32 Years ago today: On 23 June 1985 an Air-India Boeing 747-237B crashed in the Atlantic Ocean; killing all 329 occupants.

Date: Sunday 23 June 1985 Time: 07:15 UTC Type: Boeing 747-237B Operator: Air-India Registration: VT-EFO C/n / msn: 21473/330 First flight: 1978-06-19 (7 years ) Total airframe hrs: 23634 Cycles: 7525 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT9D-7J Crew: Fatalities: 22 / Occupants: 22 Passengers: Fatalities: 307 / Occupants: 307 Total: Fatalities: 329 / Occupants: 329 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 176 km (110 mls) W off Cork, Ireland (   Atlantic Ocean) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Montreal-Mirabel International Airport, QC (YMX/CYMX), Canada Destination airport: London-Heathrow Airport (LHR/EGLL), United Kingdom Flightnumber: AI182

Narrative:
Air-India Flight 181/182 was operated by Boeing 747 “Emperor Kanishka”. It arrived at Toronto, Canada after a flight from Bombay, Delhi and Frankfurt.
In Toronto a 5th spare engine was fitted below the left wing. The engine had to be ferried for repairs in India. All passengers had disembarked for custom and immigration checks. Some passengers re-boarded the flight to continue to Montreal. A total of 270 passengers boarded the flight. In addition a fresh crew of 22 came aboard. The aircraft took off from Toronto runway 24L at 00:16 UTC. The flight to Montreal was uneventful and the airplane arrived at 01:10 UTC.
Sixty-five passengers destined to Montreal along with three Air-India personnel deplaned at Montreal. The remaining 202 passengers remained on board the aircraft as transit passengers and were not allowed to disembark.
The flight number changed to AI 182 because the flight was heading back to Bombay with en route stops in London and Delhi. A total of 105 passengers boarded the flight through gate 80.
The aircraft took off from Montreal at 02:18 UTC. Its estimated time of arrival at London was 08:33 UTC.
At 07:15 UTC, at FL310 over the Atlantic Ocean an explosion occurred in the forward cargo compartment, causing a rapid decompression. The aft portion of the aircraft separated from the forward portion before striking the water. The wreckage sank to a depth of 6700 feet.
From the wreckage retrieved no direct evidence was found of an explosive device. However, there is a considerable amount of circumstantial and other evidence that an explosive device caused the occurrence.
Furthermore because an explosive device detonated in Tokyo the same day. Just 55 minutes before Air-India 182 crashed, A bag from CP Air Flight 003 exploded at Tokyo-Narita Airport, just 55 minutes before Air India 182 crashed. This was probably an interlined unaccompanied suitcase to be placed on Air-India Flight 301 to Bangkok.
Investigation determined that a suitcase was also interlined unaccompanied from Vancouver via CP Air Flight 060 to Toronto. In Toronto, there is nothing to suggest that the suitcase was not transferred to Terminal 2 and placed on board Air India Flight 181/182 in accordance with normal practice. The aircraft departed Toronto for Montreal-Mirabel and London with the suitcase unaccompanied.
Probable Cause:

CONCLUSIONS
The Canadian Aviation Safety Board respectfully submits as follows:
Cause-Related Findings:
1. At 0714 GMT, 23 June 1985, and without warning, Air India Flight 182 was subjected to a sudden event at an altitude of 31,000 feet resulting in its crash into the sea and the death of all on board.
2. The forward and aft cargo compartments ruptured before water impact.
3. The section aft of the wings of the aircraft separated from the forward portion before water impact.
4. There is no evidence to indicate that structural failure of the aircraft was the lead event in this occurrence.
5. There is considerable circumstantial and other evidence to indicate that the initial event was an explosion occurring in the forward cargo compartment. This evidence is not conclusive. However, the evidence does not support any other conclusion.

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Today is Thursday the 22nd of June, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 10:00

Here are the stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Crashed jet at Ellington Airport had military ordnance on board

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:58

Ellington Airport was shut down Wednesday morning after a fighter jet went up in flames. 

At a news conference Wednesday afternoon, Master Sgt. Sean Cowher, public affairs superintendent for the 147th Attack Wing, said the pilot on board the flight was doing well and in stable condition. He did not know if he had been released from the hospital.

Houston police, firefighters, and the Houston airport system all helped assist with the crash.

“Their quick action mitigated further damage, protected our military members and protected our community from harm,” said Colonel Matthew Barker, Vice Wing Commander for the 147th Attack Wing.

Very few details of what happened were disclosed at the afternoon  press conference, even as investigators were beginning the task of determining the cause of the crash.

An F-16 fighter jet was taking off when it caught on fire about 10:30 a.m., according to a press release from the North American Aerospace Defense Command.

The plane that crashed did not appear to have ever been fully airborne, according to Andrew Scott, spokesman for the continental region of U.S. NORAD.

The F-16 was stationed at Ellington Airport from a detachment of the 138th Fighter Wing in Tulsa, Okla., according to the release.

The pilot, who was conducting a training flight, ejected himself and was taken to an area hospital where he is being evaluated, according to the press release. His name will not be released due to the pending investigation, Barker said. 

Details surrounding the accident remain unclear. Cowher said it could be days before the aircraft is removed from Ellington as the investigation process continues.

He said an Interim Safety board will convene to track pieces of the jet from the crash and investigate what caused the incident.

“The safety of our airmen is always our top priority, so I ask for your patience while we conduct a thorough investigation” said Barker.

It was under the direction of the North American Aerospace Defense Command, an bi-national organization between the United States and Canada that is responsible for securing the North American airspace.

Houston police closed Beltway 8 between Crenshaw and Galveston due to the crash.

The burning F-16 was on the ground at the airport by 11 a.m., according to HFD.

The airport was evacuated following the crash.

Larry Satterwhite, an assistant chief at the Houston Police Department, said the downed plane had “military ordnance” on board, but said he could not specify what kind.

“The plane is still there,” Satterwhite said. “They are still trying to mitigate that situation, we have a perimeter around it to ensure the public is safe.” 

Satterwhite said he did not know if the pilot intended to down the plane. He said, “We just know the pilot is safe and that the plane is down.”

About 17 miles southeast of downtown Houston, Ellington Airport is used by the United States military, NASA and general aviation tenants, with the exception of commercial airlines.

The airport also hosts Houston Spaceport, the 10th commercial spaceport in the United States.

The city of Houston bought Ellington Airport in 1984.

http://www.chron.com/neighborhood/bayarea/news/article/HFD-Downed-airplane-on-fire-at-Ellington-Airport-11236181.php

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Passenger plane makes emergency landing at Craig Field

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:53

Two people suffered minor injuries after an American Eagle flight made an emergency landing Wednesday morning at Craig Field.

The plane, American Airlines Flight 5559, was heading from Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Washington, D.C. when it diverted to Craig Field. 

According to a statement from American Airlines, two people were transported to a local hospital for treatment of minor injuries. The plane landed because of a strong burning smell in the cockpit and cabin, according to the airline.

The emergency landing happened at about 11:40 a.m. There were 65 passengers and four crew members on board.

Menzo Driskell, Craig Field executive director, said the airport received a call from Montgomery alerting them about the emergency landing.

“My secretary came in and said there is a plane that has an emergency, they have an unresponsive passenger and there’s smoke on the plane. We alerted our volunteer fire department, and you can see the rest is kind of history,” he said. “They got the plane down, got it shut down and got the people off.”

Driskell said two passengers suffered what appeared to be minor injuries after climbing out onto one of the wings and jumping down onto the wet runway. Three passengers were evaluated by medical personnel and two were ultimately transported to the hospital.

The passengers were safely evacuated shortly after landing and were taken from the runway to a hangar to get out of Wednesday’s steady rain.

“They were standing in the rain, but we opened up [this hangar] and got them in here. A lot of my guys pitched in with that,” Driskell said. 

Selma Fire and Rescue and multiple ambulances responded to the scene. Dallas County Schools buses were used to transport passengers from the plane to a hangar.

“They were like you’d expect,” Driskell said. “They were scared and disoriented. The ones I took [to the hangar], it was like they didn’t know where they were. There was one gal actually from Alabama.”

The flight is operated by PSA Airlines, which flies under the American Eagle brand, for American Airlines and left New Orleans at 10:52 a.m. and was scheduled to arrive in D.C. at 2:27 p.m. local time. The plane is a Bombardier CRJ700 jet.

As the passengers waited in the hangar, an airlines representative told them tour buses were on their way from Montgomery to pick them up and carry them back to Montgomery Regional Airport. The airline confirmed the passengers made it safely to Montgomery Wednesday around 4:30 p.m.

“Our customer relations team will be reaching out to each of our customers to offer our apologies for what transpired,” said Ross Feinstein, spokesperson for the airline. “We’ll be offering some compensation of course as well.”

The plane is being inspected to determine what happened.

“Our maintenance team will evaluate the aircraft, and we will most likely ferry that aircraft out of there once the inspection is complete,” Feinstein said. “[The plane] will undergo an additional thorough inspection prior to being placed back in service. It’s preliminary to say when that will be, but of course the aircraft will be inspected by an aircraft maintenance team with PSA, which operated that flight.”

Driskell said there have been emergency situations at Craig Field before but nothing like Wednesday’s.

“Not on anything of a scale like this,” he said. “We’ve had a military plane break a landing gear off, but the crew was three [people] on that thing, and some things like that. We don’t get 100-passenger planes here very often.”

http://www.selmatimesjournal.com/2017/06/21/passenger-plane-makes-emergency-landing-at-craig-field/

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Plane lands without landing gear at Oxnard Airport; no injuries reported

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:51

No injuries were reported after a plane landed at the Oxnard Airport on Wednesday without its landing gear, officials said.

Rescue crews with the Oxnard and Ventura County fire departments responded at 3:27 p.m. to the airport in the 2800 block of West Fifth Street after learning that the plane was having a problem.

Oxnard fire officials said the single-engine private plane was damaged when it landed with its landing gear still up inside the plane. The pilot was the only occupant and was not injured.

Most crews had left the scene by 3:38 p.m., but some personnel and equipment remained there to help get the plane off the runway, officials said.

http://www.vcstar.com/story/news/local/communities/oxnard/2017/06/21/plane-lands-without-landing-gear-oxnard-airport-pilot-uninjured/418209001/

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RAF (and U.S) Firefighters In ‘Mid-Air Collision Exercise’ With Romanians

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:49

Fire and rescue services from the Royal Air Force, local Romanian forces and the United States carried out their first ever joint crash exercise at a base they share with civilian aircraft.

The scenario was a Typhoon and Blackhawk experiencing a mid-air collision that resulted in the Typhoon pilot ejecting and several of the helicopter crew escaping a fire onboard after a heavy landing.

With so many NATO partners each having their own separate procedures, it was important to confirm that the Crash Plan at the Mihail Kogalniceanu airbase near Constanta was fit for purpose.

Three nations fly military aircraft in close proximity to a civil airport which shares the same runway. 

The plan had to be very detailed and clearly understood by everyone despite the language barrier.

The RAF’s contribution came from 135 Expeditionary Air Wing. Their Flight Safety Officer, Flight Lieutenant “Woody”, was pleased how the teams had come together.

“I’m very pleased by how it went. I expected there to be a number of areas where we could improve and sure enough there are some aspects to work on, but overall we’ve proved that we have a good team at Mihail Kogalniceanu who are ready for any incident.”

The RAF team worked alongside a range of military specialists including fire and medical services from both Romania and the US as well as civilian police and airport staff. The fire chief, Lee, said it was vital they can co-ordinate their efforts in an emergency.

“It’s been an extremely worthwhile practical experience that has allowed each of us – Brits, Romanians and Americans – to consider our procedures and how we can develop them to better work together in future. I am very happy that together we could effectively deal with any major incident.” 

The UK is operating four Typhoon FGR4 fighters from 3(F) Squadron deployed from RAF Coningsby as its contribution to NATO’s ‘Enhanced Air Policing’ mission, providing assistance to the Romanian Air Force’s own fleet of fast-jet aircraft.

The EAW team supporting them is usually based at RAF Leeming in North Yorkshire and consists of 150 personnel drawn from across the country and will be in Romania until September.

http://www.forces.net/news/raf-firefighters-mid-air-collision-exercise-romanians

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Chairman Shuster Unveils FAA Reauthorization Bill

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:44

House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster (R-Pa.) prepared on Wednesday to release the text of a new six-year “transformational” FAA reauthorization bill that would separate Air Traffic Control functions from the FAA. But the bill resists airport calls for more self-help and maintains the outdated federal cap on local Passenger Facility Charges.

Shuster is proposing some tweaks to the initial ATC corporatization proposal that the House Transportation Committee approved last year. For instance, Shuster’s new plan would broaden the proposed ATC board of directors to include one airport representative. Last year, Shuster proposed that airports be relegated to an “advisory panel.” AAAE and ACI-NA have been making the case that airports should be fairly represented on any ATC board.

Shuster has some new momentum behind his ATC reform proposal. The President has endorsed the Chairman’s plan to have an independent, not-for-profit, non-governmental entity operate the ATC system. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) also voiced his support for the concept. However, Shuster continues to face strong opposition from Democrats and key Republicans including Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.), the Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation.

Despite dramatic changes for air traffic control, Shuster’s bill – the 21st Century Aviation Innovation, Reform, and Reauthorization Act – would largely maintain the status quo for how airports finance their infrastructure projects. It rejects airport calls to eliminate the federal cap on local PFCs. AAAE, ACI-NA, the U.S Travel Association, and airports around the country are urging Congress to eliminate the cap as a way to help large and small airports pay for needed infrastructure.

The House bill is a mixed bag for the Airport Improvement Program. On the one hand, the measure would increase AIP funding from $3.35 billion to slightly more than $3.8 billion by Fiscal Year 2023 – a $467 million increase. On the other hand, it would reduce proposed AIP funding by more than $1 billion compared to the total amount the Transportation Committee approved last year after it adopted an amendment offered by Reps. Lou Barletta (R-Pa.) and Sam Graves (R-Mo.).

Amendments to address the PFC and AIP funding are expected to materialize when the bill is considered by the House Transportation Committee next week.

http://www.aviationnews.net/index.cfm?do=headline&news_ID=266495

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:42

55 Years ago today: On 22 June 1962 an Air France Boeing 707-328 crashed near Pointe a Pitre, Guadeloupe; killing all 112 occupants.

Date: Friday 22 June 1962 Time: 04:03 Type: Boeing 707-328 Operator: Air France Registration: F-BHST C/n / msn: 18247/274 First flight: 1962 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT4A- Crew: Fatalities: 10 / Occupants: 10 Passengers: Fatalities: 103 / Occupants: 103 Total: Fatalities: 113 / Occupants: 113 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 25 km (15.6 mls) WNW of Pointe-à-Pitre-Le Raizet Airport (PTP) (   Guadeloupe) Crash site elevation: 427 m (1401 feet) amsl Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Santa Maria-Vila do Porto Airport, Azores (SMA/LPAZ), Portugal Destination airport: Pointe-à-Pitre-Le Raizet Airport (PTP/TFFR), Guadeloupe Flightnumber: AF117

Narrative:
A Boeing 707-328, operated by Air France, was destroyed when it crashed into a hillside near Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe. All 113 on board were killed.
The aircraft, named “Chateau de Chantilly”, operated flight AF117 from Paris-Orly (ORY), France to Santiago (SCU), Chile with en route stops at Lisbon (LIS), Santa Maria (SMA), Azores, Pointe-à-Pitre (PTP), Guadeloupe, Caracas (CCS), Venezuela, Lima (LIM), Peru and Bogotá (BOG), Colombia.
The VOR at Le Raizet Airport was unserviceable when the flight approached Guadeloupe at night. Weather conditions were poor; a violent thunderstorm existed in the area and visibility was 10 km and a ceiling of 1000 feet within the squall. The crew reported over the NDB at 5000 feet and carried out a turn back towards the east to begin its final approach. Incorrect ADF indications, as a result of the thunderstorm, caused the plane to stray 15 km off the procedural let-down track. The Boeing 707 then crashed into a forest on a hill at an altitude of about 1400 feet.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: 1) Breakdown of the VOR; 2) insufficient meteorological information given to the crew; 3) the atmospheric effects on the ADF indicator.

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Today is Wednesday the 21st of June, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 08:31

Here are your mid-week stories…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Pilot airlifted after being pulled from plane crash in Mahnomen County

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 08:29

MAHNOMEN COUNTY, Minn. (Valley News Live) A pilot had to be airlifted after being pulled from a plane crash near the Mahnomen Airport.

The crash happened in a field just north of the Mahnomen County Airport.

The Mahnomen Pioneer is reporting that two Minnesota Department of Transportation workers, Doug Zarling and Eric Fitzgerald, saw the plane crash Tuesday evening, while traveling on Highway 59.

The two pulled the pilot from the plane. Mahnomen area law enforcement, the Mahnomen Ambulance and Mahnomen Fire Department responded to the scene. No word yet on the condition of the pilot. No name released at this time.

Right now authorities are only confirming that there was a situation that they are investigating.

http://www.valleynewslive.com/content/news/Pilot-has-to-be-airlifted–429802133.html

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Brazil pilot survives crash landing in Amazon but dies in rescue

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 08:28

A Brazilian pilot who crash-landed into an Amazon river, saving the life of his passenger, has died after falling from a rescue helicopter.

The single-engine plane managed to land on the river after an electrical fault. It submerged within seconds.

Both pilot and passenger managed to escape and waited hours to be rescued in a hard to reach area in the jungle.

When rescuers threw a rope for them to climb up, the pilot lost his grip, fell into the river and was dragged away.

The 64-year-old pilot, Elcides Rodrigues Pereira, has been hailed as a hero after footage emerged of the dramatic crash landing, last Wednesday, in the northern state of Roraima.

Mr Pereira and Ednilson Cardoso, a 28-year-old nursing technician, were on a health mission to visit a remote indigenous tribe.

Mr Cardoso told local media that he had tied the rope around the pilot, who was tired, but he fell into the Catrimani river.

The failed rescue operation was organised by the owners of the aircraft, and not by the authorities. Fire-fighters only managed to find the body of the pilot on Saturday.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-40353333

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Ejectable, floating ‘black box’ to be installed on long range Airbus planes

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 08:26
  • Airbus is to fix deployable flight recorders to its planes
  • Recorders will eject from the plane and float on water in the event of a crash into the sea
  • The Automatic Deployable Flight Recorder (AFDR) is developed in conjunction with L3 Technologies and DRS Leonardo

David Reid@cnbcdavy

The European aerospace giant Airbus is to fix deployable flight recorders to its planes that will eject from the plane and float on water in the event of a crash into the sea.

“The beacon on it will alert emergency services within minutes” said Charles Champion , Executive Vice President of Engineering at Airbus Commercial Aircraft, at a press conference on Wednesday.

“The new recorder will hold up to 25 hours of recorded voice and data. It is designed to survive the impact of terminal velocity and will float on water,” Champion added.

Champion explained that the black box will be fitted in to the tail fins of Airbus planes but no button will be pressed to deploy it.

“The recorder will release itself automatically if submerged in two meters of water or if the planes sensors detect serious structural deformation.

“The structural damage would have to be serious. We want to ensure no deployment on a hard landing or a bird strike,” he added.

The European aerospace giant Airbus is to fix deployable flight recorders to its planes that will eject from the plane and float on water in the event of a crash into the sea.

“The beacon on it will alert emergency services within minutes” said Charles Champion , Executive Vice President of Engineering at Airbus Commercial Aircraft, at a press conference on Wednesday.

“The new recorder will hold up to 25 hours of recorded voice and data. It is designed to survive the impact of terminal velocity and will float on water,” Champion added.

Champion explained that the black box will be fitted in to the tail fins of Airbus planes but no button will be pressed to deploy it.

“The recorder will release itself automatically if submerged in two meters of water or if the planes sensors detect serious structural deformation.

“The structural damage would have to be serious. We want to ensure no deployment on a hard landing or a bird strike,” he added.

The Automatic Deployable Flight Recorder (AFDR) is developed in conjunction with L3 Technologies and DRS Leonardo and is to be fitted onto longer range Airbus planes from the A320 series right up to the A380.

A second, fixed, Cockpit Voice and Data Recorder (CVDR) will remain on the front of each airplane.

Airbus said these like the deployable version, would extend the duration of voice and data recordings to 25 hours.

The European firm also confirmed that both recorders will be fitted with integrated Emergency Locator Transmitters, designed to survive for 90 days.

Airliners currently fly with two separate recorders; one for data and one for voice. Until now, voice recorded information is restricted to 2 hours.

http://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/21/ejectable-floating-black-box-to-be-installed-on-long-range-airbus-planes.html

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Safety board frustrated with lack of action on decades-old requests to record flight data in small planes

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 08:24

By Reid Fiest – Global National Alberta Correspondent

It may seem obvious to follow and record what happens in an aircraft, but few small air carriers do it, as it’s not required by Transport Canada. 

Great Slave Helicopters is one of the few using a lightweight flight recorder.

“You could also say that this is an aircraft version of a dash-cam, but it’s also measuring more than just video,” said Fai Yuen, who is in charge of developing a program to use the data collected by the Appareo Vision 1000 hardware.

An October 2016 plane crash near Kelowna, B.C. brought the issue of lightweight flight recorders back into the spotlight. Four people died, including former Alberta Premier Jim Prentice.

At the time, the Transportation Safety Board investigators said a lack of flight recordings were hampering their search for a cause.

They said it again when a Mount Royal University plane crashed near Calgary in February killing two people.

The issue may also be brought up if a missing aircraft flying from Lethbridge, Alta. to Kamloops, B.C. is every found.

Lightweight flight recorders can capture everything from cockpit audio to flight data, which can be played back from one of three separate recordings on the device.

While the typical black boxes in airliners are used in big aircraft, a solution for smaller aircraft hasn’t been developed until recently.

One obstacle to industry take-up in smaller airlines and personal aircraft is a lack of regulation.

The other is price, with installation per unit pegged at USD$10,000 to $15,000.

That may seem prohibitive, but Yuen says when you consider the hourly cost of a chopper to be between $1,000 and $2,500 to fly, it’s not.

“It roughly works out to $2 a flight hour to run these devices.”

The Transportation Safety Board’s Jon Lee says there are a couple of reasons why the TSB is hoping more aircraft have lightweight flight recorders.

“Not only help us in our work to identify why accidents happen, but also in a proactive measure in flight operation,” Lee told Global News.

But it wasn’t a new request from the TSB. 

It first recommended updates to cockpit and flight data recorders more than 25 years ago in 1991 and renewed calls with a similar ask in 2013 as technology improved.

In a news release after the October 2016 crash, the TSB urged Transport Canada “to take advantage of the new low-cost flight recording technology to advance safety.”

So far the TSB says none of its suggestions, including the most recent in 2013, have resulted in changes.

“We’re getting a little frustrated with the lack of action on Transport Canada’s part in addressing this recommendation,” Lee said.

Global News asked Transport Canada officials why it’s taken so long to act on lightweight flight recorders, but it didn’t answer our questions.

The government also turned down our request for an interview with Transport Minister Marc Garneau.

Safety board frustrated with lack of action on decades-old requests to record flight data in small planes

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 08:17

22 Years ago today: On 21 June 1995 a Douglas C-54 air tanker crashed near Hemet-Ryan Field, CA following midair collision with a Beech Baron; killing 3 people.

Date: Wednesday 21 June 1995 Time: 11:08 Type: Douglas C-54G Operator: Aero Union Registration: N4989P C/n / msn: 36082 First flight: 1945 Total airframe hrs: 23507 Engines:Pratt & Whitney R-2000-3 Crew: Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2 Passengers: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 0 Total: Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2 Collision casualties: Fatalities: 1 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 1,6 km (1 mls) E of Ramona, CA (   United States of America) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Fire fighting Departure airport: Hemet-Ryan Field, CA (HMT/KHMT), United States of America Destination airport: Hemet-Ryan Field, CA (HMT/KHMT), United States of America

Narrative:
A Beechcraft 58P Baron (N156Z) operated by the US Forest Service took off from Ontario Airport at 08:00 for aerial fire suppression activities over the Butterfield Ranch about 30 miles northeast of Ramona Airport. Lead 56 flew over the fire area and conducted fire spotting and led several air tankers to specific drop areas. Lead 56 remained over the area until relieved by another Forest Service airplane, Lead 55, at 11:00.
At 10:22 Tanker 19, a Douglas C-54G, took off from Hemet-Ryan Field (HMT) for the third fire retardant drop in the same area. After the drop, it was instructed, along with other tankers to fly to Ramona Airport. Both the C-54 and the Baron arrived near Ramona at the same time.
The C-54 carried out a straight-in approach. The Baron, turning from base leg, struck the tail of the C-54. Both aircraft crashed and caught fire. The pilot of the Beech was killed and two residences and two vehicles were also destroyed.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “Inadequate visual lookout by the Beech 58P pilot, and the operator’s inadequate procedures concerning 360-degree overhead approaches.”

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Today is Tuesday the 20th of June, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 08:04

Here are the stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

The post Today is Tuesday the 20th of June, 2017 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

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