ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Today is Friday the 20th of April, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 08:52

We close out this week with the following stories…

Have a great weekend, be safe out there!

Tom

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2 dead in small plane crash

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 08:50

By: Myles Snyder

WILLIAMSBURG, Pa. (WHTM) – Investigators say two people died when a small plane crashed in Blair County after taking off from Lancaster on Thursday morning. 

The Cirrus SR-22 crashed in a rural residential area near Williamsburg around 8:44 a.m.

Investigators told WTAJ-TV a nearby homeowner heard an explosion, saw the single-engine plane engulfed in flames, and tried to put out the fire with a garden hose.

Authorities said the two victims were the only people on the plane. The men have not been positively identified.

Video from the television station showed firefighters spraying water on wreckage that was scattered across a field.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration were at the crash site. Representatives of the National Transportation Safety Board were expected there on Friday.

http://www.abc27.com/news/local/lancaster/2-feared-dead-in-small-plane-crash/1130023902

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Malindo Air Boeing 737-900 off runway after aborted takeoff in Nepal

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 08:48
Date: 19-APR-2018 Time: 22:09 LT Type: Boeing 737-9GPER (WL) Owner/operator: Malindo Air Registration: 9M-LNJ C/n / msn: 38690/4495 Fatalities: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: Other fatalities: 0 Airplane damage: Unknown Category: Serious incident Location: Kathmandu-Tribhuvan Airport (KTM/VNKT) –    Nepal Phase: Take off Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Kathmandu-Tribhuvan Airport (KTM/VNKT) Destination airport: Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KUL/WMKK)

Narrative:
Malindo Air flight OD181 suffered a runway excursion after an aborted takeoff at Kathmandu-Tribhuvan Airport, Nepal.

The aircraft was cleared for takeoff from runway 20 and commenced the takeoff roll at 22:08 hours local time.

Takeoff was aborted as the aircraft was halfway down the runway. It failed to stop on the remaining runway and overran.

The runway was subsequently closed for traffic.

Weather about the time of the incident (22:09 LT/1624Z):
VNKT 191620Z 15004KT 7000 FEW015 SCT100 18/14 Q1014 NOSIG

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Man Killed in Fire at Nevada County Airport Hangar

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 08:44

NEVADA COUNTY — Flight operations at the Nevada County Airport continued uninterrupted after a deadly fire at Sierra Mountain Aviation located right next to the runway. 

It started at the beginning of the workday at Sierra Mountain Aviation’s maintenance hangar. There were three airplanes inside.

The fire call came in as a rescue and flames had subsided by the time fire crews arrived.

“The fire sprinklers had activated and we did have to rescue one person, who unfortunately is deceased,” Nevada County Consolidated Fire District Fire Marshal Terry McMahon said.

The fire sprinklers, along with a fire wall that split the building, saved the business next door. It was able to resume partial operations with just smoke damage.
But it was the smoke that may very well have been deadly.

“Fiberglass and the upholsteries and the things that they use in them, the smoke was dark and was down low to the ground,” McMahon said. “Very toxic.”

The victim is 65-year-old John Pichitino, a longtime pilot, flight instructor and mechanic at the airport. Word spread quickly among the tightly knit flying community at the airport.

“People are really getting emotional because he was a well-known person around here and touched a lot of people’s lives,” airport manager Lee Ocker said.

In a stroke of irony, the last fire at the airport was in 1994 in another hangar not a hundred yards from Wednesday’s fire. It also killed a pilot.

Pilot and flight instructor Ken Joyce knew both victims, adding to the sense of tragedy.

“Married with a wife and one kid and just unfortunate thing that smoke got to him before anybody could get to him,” Joyce said.

A female office worker was also treated for smoke inhalation and was hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries.

Meanwhile, the investigation continues into what may have caused the fire.

Man Killed in Fire at Nevada County Airport Hangar

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Tanker fire reported at Cape May County airport

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 08:42

An oil tanker at the Cape May Airport went up in flames Thursday afternoon.

Lower Township police responded at 1 p.m. to the airport for a report of an oil tanker truck that had caught fire. The front of the truck was in flames with heavy black smoke.

Officer Kaitlin Black evacuated the area and blocked off the entrance to the airport.

The Erma Fire Company responded and quickly extinguished the fire, according to a statement from police.

The tanker and another vehicle that was parked next to it were badly damaged, according to police. An electric pole and transformer also were damaged.

Fire crews on the scene said there were no injuries and that the fire was extinguished within 30 minutes.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/news/tanker-fire-reported-at-cape-may-county-airport/article_476a88b1-837e-5e93-84cc-c8e97e408b43.html

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Pittsford honors responders to plane crash

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 08:41

By SUSAN SMALLHEER

STAFF WRITER

PITTSFORD — On the night last November that Norman Baker’s aircraft disappeared somewhere in the autumn fog over Pittsford, a police officer drove his son around as they tried to find clues about what happened to the missing pilot and his single-engine Cessna. 

“It was Officer Antje. I drove around with her all night long and it was the night before Thanksgiving,” Dan Baker said Thursday, referring to Pittsford Police Officer Antje Schermerhorn, one of several police officers, firefighters and emergency responders who worked the night before Thanksgiving to find the senior Baker.

On Wednesday, the town of Pittsford honored the dozens of Pittsford emergency responders who worked to find Norman Baker, an 89-year-old pilot from Windsor, Massachusetts, who was flying to meet his children in Vermont for the holiday before his plane disappeared on its way to Middlebury State Airport.

The Select Board presented plaques to the Police Department, the Fire Department and Pittsford First Response, praising them for their work the night of Nov. 22, 2017.

Baker and his wrecked plane were found the next morning.

The elder Baker was an adventurer of some renown: The Boston Globe and The New York Times wrote profiles about the man who, among other adventures, was the celestial navigator for the famed Norwegian explorer Thor Heyerdahl, who made trans-Atlantic crossings in boats made of papyrus reeds.

But nobody knew that on Nov. 22 except his family; the Pittsford first responders only knew someone’s father was missing.

“In recognition of excellent police officer performance, above and beyond the call of duty,” read the commendation, listing Lt. William Pratico, Officers Stephane Goulet and Schermerhorn, as well as Officer Jerry Tift and Officer Tim Cornell.

“Pittsford Assistant Fire Chief William Hemple led several of his colleagues in responding to news of a missing man and an overdue aircraft,” read the fire department’s commendation.

Robert Foley and colleagues of Pittsford First Response went “above and beyond the call of duty,” that night, “always remaining prepared to provide medical attention to anyone in need” and later helped with the removal of the pilot’s body, according to the commendation.

Town Manager John Haverstock said Wednesday’s event was “a very moving opportunity for the town to once again thank the police, fire and rescue people.”

He said Dan Baker attended the ceremony at the Pittsford town office.

Pratico said Pittsford emergency personnel went into action the night before Thanksgiving after a resident on Sugar Hollow Road reported seeing a plane flying very low, perhaps with engine trouble.

After contacting various airports and aviation authorities, none of which reported anyone missing, local police, firefighters, and Vermont State Police went out into the general area and looked and looked and looked.

“We exhausted all our means,” Pratico said, adding there was no doubt a plane was missing, as other residents reported hearing the low-flying aircraft.

The Civil Air Patrol did a flyover, but couldn’t pick up any signals, Pratico said. And police learned it wasn’t unusual for pilots to fly low “under the fog to see where they were going.”

He said no one heard a crash.

The next morning, one Pittsford resident who had heard the plane searches and read some of the notices, went out on his own property and quickly found Baker and the remains of the plane.

“I think he saw a piece of debris in a tree that drew his attention and he walked right over to it,” Pratico said.

Baker’s plane had crashed into a heavily wooded ridgeline and broke apart.

Pratico and Dan Baker said the National Transportation Safety Board still has not concluded its investigation into the fatal crash. The younger Baker said it likely will be several more months before the investigation was completed.

“We’ve been in touch with them and it’s still ongoing,” he said. 

Dan Baker said he has his own theory on why his father, an experienced pilot who had flown to the Middlebury airport close to 20 times in recent years, crashed. In fact, his father had flown to the Middlebury airport just two weeks earlier to meet his newest twin granddaughters, said Baker, a Starksboro resident.

He doesn’t believe his father ran out of fuel. He said he believes his father had lost consciousness and in his last moments steered his plane away from Route 7 and homes “and made sure no one else was injured.”

His father had long planned for emergencies, he said, and would have put his plane down on Route 7, or one of the many open fields in the area.

Dan Baker, a professor of community development and applied economics at the University of Vermont, said his father was an extremely skilled pilot, once landing the two of them in his single-engine plane at Boston’s Logan Airport so his son could make a connection.

He praised the work of the Pittsford officers and volunteers who helped him and his family.

“When they found my dad, they allowed me to be a witness for my family,” he said.

“I couldn’t have been more impressed and grateful for their dedication and their skill,” he said. “They were pretty wonderful folks.”

Pittsford honors responders to plane crash

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 08:38

50 Years ago today: On 20 April 1968 a South African Airways Boeing 707 descended into the ground immediately after takeoff from Windhoek; killing 123 out of 128 occupants.

Date: Saturday 20 April 1968 Time: 20:50 Type: Boeing 707-344C Operator: South African Airways – SAA Registration: ZS-EUW C/n / msn: 19705/675 First flight: 1968 Total airframe hrs: 238 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT3D-7 Crew: Fatalities: 12 / Occupants: 12 Passengers: Fatalities: 111 / Occupants: 116 Total: Fatalities: 123 / Occupants: 128 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 5 km (3.1 mls) E of Windhoek-Strijdom International Airport (WDH) (   Namibia) Phase: Initial climb (ICL) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Windhoek-Strijdom International Airport (WDH/FYWE), Namibia Destination airport: Luanda-4 de Fevereiro Airport (LAD/FNLU), Angola Flightnumber: SA228

Narrative:
A Boeing 707-344C passenger jet, registered ZS-EUW, was destroyed in an accident near Windhoek-Strijdom International Airport, Namibia.
The aircraft was operating on South African Airways’ flight SA228 from Johannesburg to London via Windhoek, Luanda, Las Palmas and Frankfurt. The first leg of the flight was uneventful.
Local weather conditions at Windhoek were fine: there was no cloud and no wind. The night was particularly dark as there was no moon and the horizon was indistinct.
At 20:49 the aircraft took off from Windhoek runway 08 into conditions of complete darkness. The aircraft climbed to a height of about 650 feet above ground level.
It leveled off and began to descend. Thirty seconds later, the aircraft flew into the ground at a point some 5,327 metres from the end of the runway. The level of the ground at the point of impact was 179 feet below the airport elevation or approximately 100 feet below the point of lift-off. The impact occurred at a groundspeed of approximately 271 knots.
The initial impact was in a slightly left-wing-down attitude. The fuselage and each of the 4 engine pods gouged deep trenches in the ground and the aircraft then began to break up as its momentum carried it onward. Wreckage was strewn over an area some 1,400 metres long and some 200 metres wide, and 2 separate fires broke out, presumably through the ignition of fuel on impact.

Probable Cause:

In regard to the cause of the accident:
(1) The effective cause of the accident was the human factor, and not any defect in the aircraft or in any of the engines or flight instruments.
(2) After a normal take- off and retraction of the landing gear, and while the aircraft was approaching an estimated height of 650 feet, the flaps were fully retracted and the engine output reduced from take- off power to climb power. There is no reason to suppose that these steps were not taken in the correct sequence and at the prescribed indicated airspeeds. In that phase of flight these alterations in flap configuration and engine power would have caused the aircraft to level off and then lose height
(a) unless the pilot checked that tendency and maintained a climbing attitude by appropriate action, or
(b) until the aircraft gained much more speed.
(3) The aircraft levelled off and lost height, and during the short period in which it did so the pilot appears to have acted as if he believed that the aircraft was still climbing. He appears to have altered the stabilizer trim to maintain the aircraft in its same pitch attitude, which he apparently believed was an attitude of climb, but which was in fact an attitude of descent. In that situation, which lasted for about 30 seconds, the aircraft lost approximately 750 feet in height and flew into the ground.
(4) The co-pilot failed to monitor the flight instruments sufficiently to appreciate that the aircraft was losing height.
The following causes probably contributed in greater or lesser degree to the situation described above:
(a) take-off into conditions of total darkness with no external visual reference;
(b) inappropriate alteration of stabilizer trim;
(c) spatial disorientation;
(d) pre-occupation with after-take-off checks.
The following causes might have contributed in greater or lesser degree:
(a) temporary confusion in the mind of the pilot on the position of the inertial-lead vertical speed indicator, arising from the difference in the instrument panel layout in the C model of the Boeing 707-344 aircraft, as compared with the A and B models, to which both pilots were accustomed;
(b) the pilot’s misinterpretation, by one thousand feet, of the reading on the drum-type altimeter, which is susceptible to ambiguous interpretation on the thousands scale;
(c) distraction on the flight deck caused by a bird or bat strike, or some other relatively minor occurrence.

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Today is Thursday the 19th of April, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/19/2018 - 08:06

Here are the stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Delta plane makes emergency landing in Atlanta

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/19/2018 - 08:04

FAA officials say the Airbus A333 returned to Hartsfield-Jackson Airport shortly after takeoff when smoke was spotted billowing from an engine.

by Ethan Sacks

A Delta Air Lines plane made an emergency landing Wednesday at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport shortly after takeoff when smoke was spotted billowing out of its right engine. 

The airline confirmed that Delta Flight 30 from Atlanta to London returned to the airport “after an issue with its No. 2 engine” minutes after taking off at 6 p.m.

“The flight landed without incident and airport response vehicles met the aircraft upon arrival,” Delta said in a statement. “The airplane was towed to the gate, where customers deplaned through the jetway and will be accommodated on a different aircraft. The safety of our customers and crew is always our top priority and we apologize to our customers on this flight.”

The scare on the Airbus A333 comes just one day after a passenger onboard a Southwest Airlines flight was killed after one of the plane’s engines failed, damaging the fuselage and shattering a window, forcing an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

On Wednesday, the situation turned out a lot less dire.

“The plane almost immediately arrived on the same runway it departed from, Runway 27, and was met by firefighters who hosed down smoke coming from the engine,” Hartsfield-Jackson spokesman Andrew Gobeil told NBC News.

Video on social media shows what appears to be a fire in the engine being extinguished by fire crews on the tarmac.

Gobeil said there were no reports of injuries, and the passengers disembarked from the plane approximately an hour after the emergency landing.

FAA officials said the agency was investigating the incident.

https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/airplane-mode/delta-plane-makes-emergency-landing-atlanta-n867296

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Aircraft emergency lands near Salton City

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/19/2018 - 08:02

Crystal Bedoya

The Federal Aviation Administration initially reported a crash near Salton City Wednesday morning but we learned through officials that the plane had a soft landing.

According to Salton City Fire Station, the plane’s single-engine died down and the single passenger glided to a soft impact. The passenger only sustained a small laceration to his right hand when impacting.

Authorities said they don’t have crashes like these on a regular basis but every now and then they get gliders that hit a draft of wind that causes them to crash land.

ORIGINAL STORY

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a PULSAR III airplane crashed due to an engine failure near Salton City, Calif. at 8:50 a.m.

The crash was a non-fatal accident with one person on board with minor injuries. There is unknown damage to the aircraft, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

The FAA and the NTSB are investigating the crash.

http://www.kyma.com/news/aircraft-emergency-lands-near-salton-city/731308266

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Colorado Springs Airport fully reopens Wednesday

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/19/2018 - 07:59

The Colorado Springs Airport has fully reopened Wednesday following a full day of closure due to a fire on the roof of the terminal.

Be sure to check with your carrier to find out if your previously scheduled flight will still take place. 

Early Tuesday morning, airport spokeswomen Aidan Ryan said the damage done by the three alarm fire before midnight was extensive.

Most of the damage was caused by water forced on the roof and ceiling to knock down the flames.  A peek inside the front windows shows water damage, ceiling damage and electrical wiring damage.

The fire was first reported at 10:53 Monday night. Flames and smoke were visible from outside the airport, however just after midnight, most of the smoke started to dissipate. An investigation is underway to determine the cause of the blaze.

Airport officials say a team is headed into the airport to assess the damage and try to make a determination of when the airport can re-opened. That may come as early as Tuesday afternoon.

The airport was evacuated, and passengers on planes that just landed at the airport were not allowed to disembark right away, but eventually deplaned at the Jet Center on Aviation Way.

The baggage system was affected by the fire and passengers taken off of aircraft Monday night did not have access to their luggage. The airlines are working to arrange a way for passengers to either pick their bags up, or have them delivered to their location.

There is no pick up or return for rental cars at the airport at this time. Officials are telling customers to contact the rental car company directly to find alternative ways to return or rent a vehicle.

All airport employees should report to the field shop on Resnick Drive during their regular scheduled shift.

http://www.koaa.com/story/37971373/colorado-springs-airport-opens-wednesday-with-limited-service-following-fire

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NTSB: Southwest 737 Engine Shows Signs Of Metal Fatigue

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/19/2018 - 07:56

It its initial examination of the Southwest Boeing 737 that suffered an uncontained engine failure Tuesday, the NTSB reports that the damaged engine was missing one of 24 fan blades. 

CNN reports that NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt said that the engine appeared to show evidence of metal fatigue where the blade attached to the hub.

Southwest CEO Gary Kelly said at a news conference that he was not aware with any issues with the airplane or engine involved in the incident. He sad that the plane had been inspected on April 15, but did not have details about the extent of the extension.

The woman who was reportedly pulled partially out of the airplane when the window shattered, and later passed away, was identified as Jennifer Riordan. Kelly said that Riordan’s family is the airline’s primary concern. “This is a sad day and our hearts go out to the family and the loved ones of the deceased customer,” he said. “We will do all that we can to support them during this very difficult time.”

The pilot of the plane, Tammie Jo Shults, is being hailed as a hero for safely landing the crippled airplane in Philadelphia. Shults is a former U.S. Navy fighter pilot, and was one of the first women to fly fighters in the Navy, and one of the first women to qualify in F/A-18 Hornets. While Southwest has not officially acknowledged that Shults was the pilot, she was identified by several passengers on social media. It was also confirmed to the AP by her husband, according to the Washington Post.

(Engine photo from YouTube video posted by CBC News)

FMI: Original ReportOriginal Report

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NTSB Releases Preliminary Report From ERAU PA-28 Accident

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/19/2018 - 07:53

Aircraft Broke Up In Flight Resulting In Two Fatal Injuries

The NTSB has released its preliminary report from an accident involving a PA-28 airplane that resulted in the fatal injury of two people, a private pilot conducting his commercial pilot single-engine land practical test, and an airline transport pilot who was acting as a designated pilot examiner (DPE). 

On April 4, 2018, at 0953 eastern daylight time, the Piper PA-28R-201, N106ER, collided with terrain following an in-flight breakup shortly after takeoff from Daytona Beach International Airport (KDAB), Daytona Beach, FL. The airline transport pilot and private pilot were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Preliminary radar and voice communication data provided by the FAA revealed that the airplane flew to the southeast after departure; after maneuvering, it returned to KDAB. The airplane entered the airport traffic pattern and performed a touch-and-go landing. While climbing out after the takeoff from runway 25L, air traffic control issued the pilot a discrete transponder code, and shortly after, the pilot asked if they could make a left turn to the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern. The controller responded by telling the pilot to continue upwind. Radar data indicated that the airplane climbed to 900 ft mean sea level at a groundspeed of 80 knots on a heading of 240° before radar contact was lost.

According to multiple witnesses, all located within 2,500 ft of the accident site, they saw the airplane flying normally, then watched as the left wing separated from fuselage. The fuselage impacted a field, while the wing descended separately and landed in an adjacent field.

According to FAA records, the pilot, age 25, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on June 17, 2016. He reported 201 hours of flight experience as of his most recent logbook entry on March 19, 2018.

According to FAA records, the DPE, age 61, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land. In addition, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on April 5, 2017. At that time, he reported 27,600 total hours of flight experience.

According to FAA airworthiness and operator records, the airplane was manufactured on September 17, 2007 and was issued a standard airworthiness certificate in the normal category. It was a single-engine, low-wing, four-place airplane with a 200-horsepower, Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 four-cylinder engine and a McCauley two-blade, constant-speed propeller. The airframe had accumulated 7,690.6 hours of operation at the time of the accident, and 28.3 hours since its most recent annual inspection, which was completed on March 21, 2018.

A surface observation weather report taken at DAB at 0953 indicated the wind was from 260° at 7 knots, the visibility was 10 statute miles, and few clouds at 25,000 ft. The temperature and dew point were 24°C and 19°C, respectively, and the altimeter setting was 30.03 inches of mercury.

The debris path was about 450 ft long, and the debris path began about 2 statute miles southwest of the departure end of runway 25L. The first items along the debris path included a rubber wing root seal and small pieces of window plexiglass, followed shortly thereafter by the left wing. The main wreckage impacted the adjacent field about 200 ft from the wing on a magnetic heading about 230°.

The forward portion of the fuselage, including the engine, exhibited significant impact-related damage. There was a strong odor of fuel at the site, and a large area of grass surrounding the wreckage was discolored. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage. An impression of the right wing leading edge was observed in the ground, and the right wing leading edge surface was crushed aft to the wing spar along the entire span of the wing. The flap and aileron of the right wing remained attached. The right landing gear was in the down and locked position.

The vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilator, and trim tab control surfaces remained attached. Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the rudder to the rudder pedals. Elevator control cable continuity was established through cuts made to facilitate the wreckage recovery from the control column to the elevator control surface. Aileron control continuity was confirmed from the right aileron to the control column. Continuity of left aileron control cables was traced from the control column through fracture features consistent with tensile overload separation to the aileron.

The left wing separated from the fuselage near the wing root and exhibited mid-span buckling of the surface skin. The left wing flap remained connected and moved freely with no resistance. The left main landing gear was in the down and locked position. The left wing fuel tank remained intact and contained about 15 gallons of fuel.

The fractured left wing main spar portions, along with the box assembly and attached inboard end of the right wing main spar, were forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for detailed examination. Preliminary examination of the left wing main spar revealed that more than 80% of the lower spar cap and portions of the forward and aft spar web doublers exhibited fracture features consistent with metal fatigue. The remainder of the lower spar cap, spar web doublers, and upper spar cap displayed fracture features consistent with overstress fracture. The fatigue features originated at or near the outboard forward wing spar attachment bolt hole. None of the surfaces exhibited visible evidence of corrosion or other preexisting damage. The right wing also exhibited fatigue cracks in the lower spar cap at the same hole location extending up to 0.047-inch deep.

(Image provided with NTSB preliminary report)

FMI: Report

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/19/2018 - 07:51

18 Years ago today: On 19 April 2000 an Air Philippines Boeing 737-200 crashed on approach to Davao; killing all 131 on board

Date: Wednesday 19 April 2000 Time: ca 07:00 Type: Boeing 737-2H4 Operator: Air Philippines Registration: RP-C3010 C/n / msn: 21447/508 First flight: 1978-01-19 (22 years 3 months) Total airframe hrs: 68475 Cycles: 79522 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-9A Crew: Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 124 / Occupants: 124 Total: Fatalities: 131 / Occupants: 131 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: 6,5 km (4.1 mls) from Davao (   Philippines) Crash site elevation: 152 m (499 feet) amsl Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Manila-Ninoy Aquino International Airport (MNL/RPLL), Philippines Destination airport: Davao City-Francisco Bangoy International Airport (DVO/RPMD), Philippines Flightnumber: 541

Narrative:
Air Philippines Flight 541 left Manila (MNL) at 05:21 and was due to land at Davao (DVO) around 06:45. At 06:56, while approaching Davao, the crew were told to discontinue the ILS runway 05 approach because of traffic on the runway (probably Philippine Airlines flight 809 which had just landed). A request to carry out a VOR/DME approach and landing in the opposite direction (runway 23) was approved by ATC. Last radio contact was at 07:01 when the pilot reported 7 miles out. Nothing more was heard from the flight when ATC tried to clear the flight to land around 07:03. The Boeing slammed into a coconut plantation in Mt. Kalangan, Sitio Camanlangan in Barangay San Isidro, disintegrated and caught fire. The accident site is around 500 feet above sea level; at that point the altitude of the aircraft should have been 1500 feet.
Weather was said to have been fair with a low cloud ceiling for Davao.

Classification:

Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) – Mountain

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Today is Wednesday the 18th of April, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:20

A busy day yesterday for our Brothers and Sisters at PHL and IAD, and it looked like a good job by all involved!

Here are some stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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The Latest: NTSB: Engine fan blade shows metal fatigue

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:13

The Latest on a plane making an emergency landing in Philadelphia (all times local):

9:55 p.m.

The National Transportation Safety Board says a preliminary examination of the blown jet engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia shows evidence of “metal fatigue.”

In a late night news conference, NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt said one of the engine’s fan blades was separated and missing. Sumwalt says the blade was separated at the point where it would come into the hub and there was evidence of metal fatigue.

One person was killed and seven others were injured after the twin-engine 737 blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window. The plane from New York to Dallas landed in Philadelphia.

Sumwalt says part of the engine covering was found in Bernville, Pennsylvania, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) west of Philadelphia.

___

7 p.m.

A bank executive and mother of two from New Mexico has been identified as the woman who died after a Southwest Airlines jet plane blew an engine and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window.

News of Jennifer Riordan’s death was first shared by the assistant principal of the Albuquerque Catholic school attended by her two children.

In an email to parents, assistant principal Amy McCarty wrote that “the family needs all the prayers we can offer.”

Riordan was a vice president of community relations for Wells Fargo bank. She was the wife of Michael Riordan, who served until recently as the chief operating officer for the city of Albuquerque.

The New Mexico Broadcasters Association on social media said Riordan was a graduate of the University of New Mexico and former board member.

___

6:20 p.m.

The head of Southwest Airlines says that there were no problems with a plane involved in a fatal emergency landing when it was inspected two days ago.

Chief executive Gary Kelly said at a news conference in Dallas Tuesday that there were no problems with the plane or its engine when it was inspected Sunday.

One person was killed and seven injured after the twin-engine 737 apparently blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window. The plane from New York to Dallas landed in Philadelphia.

Kelly says the plane has gone through 40,000 takeoffs and landings since it was delivered in July 2000. That includes 10,000 since its last overhaul.

He declined to identify the crew or the name of the dead passenger.

___

5:45 p.m.

The US transportation secretary is praising the pilots, crew and passengers for helping to prevent a far worse tragedy on a Southwest flight that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

One person was killed and seven injured after the twin-engine 737 apparently blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window.

The plane was headed from New York to Dallas with 149 people aboard when it detoured to Philadelphia.

Secretary Elaine Chao said her department is working with the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause and ensure the safety of the traveling public.

___

5 p.m.

A crew member on a plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia reported to air traffic controllers that a piece of the plane was missing and “someone went out.”

In the audio recording of the exchange, the crew member says the plane needed to slow down.

Photos posted by passengers showed a heavily damaged window near the damaged engine. Passengers reported seeing a woman being given medical attention on the plane.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt says that one person died in the accident. No details have been released on how the passenger died. Seven others were injured.

___

4:35 p.m.

The company that made the engine that blew apart on a Southwest Airlines jet says it is helping investigators figure out what went wrong.

CFM International said in a statement Tuesday that it sent technical experts to help the National Transportation Safety Board officials.

A passenger died after the left-side engine on a Southwest jet blew apart over Pennsylvania on Tuesday. The pilots made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

CFM is a joint venture of General Electric and France’s Safran.

The company says the type of engine on the Southwest plane is installed on more than 6,700 planes and has flown more than 350 million hours since its introduction in 1997.

The company says the engine has an outstanding safety and reliability record.

___

3:15 p.m.

A federal investigator says one person has been killed after a plane with engine failure made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt said Tuesday that the engine will be shipped for a detailed examination.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, as well as the fuselage and at least one window.

Philadelphia’s fire chief says that one person was taken to the hospital in critical condition and seven were treated for minor injuries.

___

2:35 p.m.

Philadelphia’s fire chief says that one person was taken to the hospital in critical condition after a Southwest Airlines plane made an emergency landing.

Philadelphia Fire Department Commissioner Adam Thiel (TEAL’) declined to release any additional details on the victim or their condition.

He says that seven other passengers were treated for minor injuries, but none had to be taken to the hospital.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, as well as the fuselage and at least one window.

Thiel says that there was a fuel leak and a small fire when firefighters arrived.

He didn’t release any additional details on the landing.

___

2 p.m.

A passenger aboard a Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia says at least one woman was taken to the hospital.

Amanda Bourman, of New York, said that the woman was taken off the plane by emergency medical workers Tuesday after the emergency landing around 11:20 a.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration says a flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, as well as the fuselage and at least one window.

Passenger Marty Martinez says a window exploded mid-air and posted photo of a damaged window and emergency oxygen masks dangling down.

It wasn’t clear if anyone else was injured.

___

1:50 p.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration says a flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing at Philadelphia’s airport after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, as well as the fuselage and at least one window.

Passenger Marty Martinez says a window exploded mid-air and posted photo of a damaged window and emergency oxygen masks dangling down.

The National Transportation Safety Board says it is taking over the investigation.

___

12:45 p.m.

A passenger on a Southwest Airlines plane says a window was damaged after a problem with its left engine and the plane made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

Southwest Airlines says there were 143 passengers and five crewmembers on board the flight Tuesday en route from New York’s La Guardia Airport to Dallas. The airline says something went awry and they landed at Philadelphia’s airport.

Passenger Marty Martinez says a window exploded mid-air and posted photo of a damaged window and emergency oxygen masks dangling down.

Passengers were seen walking off the plane on the tarmac at the airport and the left engine of the plane is damaged.

It wasn’t immediately clear if anyone was hurt.

Messages seeking comment from the Federal Aviation Administration weren’t immediately returned.

___

12:20 p.m.

Southwest Airlines says that one of its planes heading from New York’s LaGuardia Airport to Dallas’ Love Field landed safely in Philadelphia.

Tracking data from FlightAware.com shows the flight was heading west over New York’s southern tier when it abruptly turned toward Philadelphia.

Passengers were seen walking off the plane on the tarmac at the airport and the left engine of the plane is damaged.

It wasn’t immediately clear if anyone was hurt.

Messages seeking comment from the Federal Aviation Administration weren’t immediately returned.

____

12:15 p.m.

A Southwest Airlines plane has made an emergency landing at Philadelphia’s airport with what appears to be a damaged engine.

Passengers were seen walking off the plane on the tarmac at the airport.

Passengers on board posted on social media that the plane was en route from New York City to Dallas when something happened.

Messages seeking comment from the Federal Aviation Administration weren’t immediately returned.

Firefighters are on the scene but a spokeswoman couldn’t provide any details.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/the-latest-ntsb-engine-fan-blade-shows-metal-fatigue

The post The Latest: NTSB: Engine fan blade shows metal fatigue appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

“It was the scariest experience”: Passenger describes engine failure on Southwest Airlines flight

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:11

By PETER MARTINEZ – CBS NEWS

At about 30,000 feet, something went terribly wrong with the left engine on Southwest Airlines Flight 1380 from New York to Dallas. The engine failure sent metal parts flying into the plane’s fuselage and blew out a passenger window, killing Jennifer Riordan, a married mother of two from New Mexico. The Boeing 737 with 149 people aboard made an emergency landing in Philadelphia as terrified passengers wore oxygen masks.

One of those passengers, Marty Martinez, joined CBSN over the phone to describe the harrowing account of happened just a few seats away from him.

“The engine exploded and when it exploded it broke a window in row 17,” Martinez said. “That window caused all the oxygen to go out … a woman was injured … there was blood everywhere.” He told CBSN that people were trying to help the woman as another tried to plug the broken window unsuccessfully. He described the woman as being older and she was taken off the plane once it landed.

He said that there was Wi-Fi on the plane so he was able to stream a Facebook video that showed him wearing an oxygen mask as the plane descended into Philly. 

“I thought I was cataloging the last moments of my existence,” Martinez said.

“First there was an explosion, and then almost immediately the oxygen masks come down and … the engine exploded then hit the window and busted it right open,” Martinez said. “It felt like the plane was freefalling … of course everyone is like freaking out, everybody is crying. It was the scariest experience.”

He added: “To see all the flight attendants crying, we knew it was something bad. Meanwhile I was on Facebook Live cranking out as many comments as I could thinking that was going to be the last few moments on this Earth.”

“All I could think about was family and my friends, my girlfriend, my brother, my sisters, my mom … it was terrifying,” Martinez said.

After the plane landed, he posted photos of the broken window and damaged engine.

“Everybody was crying and upset,” fellow passenger Amanda Bourman of New York told The Associated Press. “You had a few passengers that were very strong, and they kept yelling to people, you know, ‘It’s OK! We’re going to do this!'”

“I just remember holding my husband’s hand, and we just prayed and prayed and prayed,” Bourman said. “And the thoughts that were going through my head of course were about my daughters, just wanting to see them again and give them a big hug so they wouldn’t grow up without parents.”

The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane landed after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, along with the fuselage and at least one window. The NTSB sent a team of investigators to Philadelphia.

The flight was powered by CFM56-7B engines. An official told CBS News that CFM International has sent representatives to the scene to support the investigation.

The NTSB said Tuesday night that a preliminary examination found evidence of metal fatigue where an engine blade separated from the engine. Southwest announced that it is accelerating its inspections of CFM56 engines “out of an abundance of caution.”

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/southwest-airlines-flight-1380-emergency-landing-engine-failure-explosion-passengers-marty-martinez-2018-04-17/

The post “It was the scariest experience”: Passenger describes engine failure on Southwest Airlines flight appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Flight Makes Safe Emergency Landing at Dulles After Losing Tire

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:07

By Julie Carey. Carissa Dimargo and Sophia Barnes

A Delta Express plane made a safe emergency landing at Dulles International Airport on Tuesday afternoon after losing a left front tire. 

Flight 5507 was en route to Richmond from LaGuardia Airport when the flight declared an emergency after the crew was notified they lost a wheel on takeoff, according to the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority.

Passengers said they got word halfway through the flight that they needed to make an emergency landing.

“You just try to keep a brave face,” said Mark Jenkins, who was on the final leg of a trip from England to Richmond.

“There wasn’t anything we could do,” said passenger Megan Oley. “Just sit and pray. That’s it.”

Anxiety surged as flight attendents prepared passengers for a potentially bumpy landing.

“They mentioned the brace for impact. I’m not gonna lie. My heart jumped a little bit,” another passenger, Joseph Zammito, said.

But the landing went relatively smoothly, passengers reported. 

“It was the smoothest landing that I’ve had for a couple of years,” Jenkins said.

The plane was inspected after landing at Dulles. It was missing a main gear wheel.

No damage fromt he landing was found, but the plane was listing at 45 degrees and was unable to taxi to the gate. Passengers were brought onto an airport shuttle, grabbed their bags and were boarded on a bus to Richmond.

Also Tuesday, a Dallas-bound Southwest Airlines flight made an emergency landing in Philadelphia. The jet’s left engine blew shortly after takeoff, NBC Philadelphia reported. A piece of shrapnel apparently flew into a window causing the glass to break. One person has died as a result.

https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Flight-Makes-Emergency-Landing-at-Dulles-After-Losing-Tire-480017093.html

The post Flight Makes Safe Emergency Landing at Dulles After Losing Tire appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Mock plane crash drill set for Sonoma County airport

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:04

Emergency agencies from around Sonoma County and volunteer victims from area schools will be at the Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport Wednesday for a drill preparing for a plane crash.

The drill, from 10 a.m. to noon, will involve a simulated plane crash with 40‑50 victims. Firefighters, paramedics, a hazardous materials team, law enforcement, dispatchers and two helicopters will coordinate how to respond to a crash with a large number of victims.

Such trainings are required by the Federal Aviation Administration every three years.

The airport, northwest of Santa Rosa, is within the Rincon Valley Fire Protection District boundaries. Rincon Valley fire and airport officials are coordinating the drill.

“Having a commercial airport in our jurisdiction is a big responsibility and the public at large should feel safe in knowing that their first responders know how to deal with an aircraft emergency, whatever the scale,” said Rincon Valley Fire Chief Mark Heine in a statement.

Volunteer victims include Windsor High School and Santa Rosa Junior College students. They’ll be taken to Santa Rosa Memorial and Petaluma Valley hospitals to allow hospital staff to train for such a response.

You can reach Staff Writer Randi Rossmann at 707‑521-5412 or randi.rossmann@pressdemocrat.com.

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/8232844-181/mock-plane-crash-drill-set?sba=AAS

The post Mock plane crash drill set for Sonoma County airport appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:02

46 Years ago today: On 18 April 1972 an East African Vickers VC-10 jetliner overran the Addis Ababa runway after aborting takeoff due to a tyre failure; killing 43 out of 107 occupants.

Date: Tuesday 18 April 1972 Time: 09:39 Type: Vickers Super VC10-1154 Operator: East African Airways Corp. – EAAC Registration: 5X-UVA C/n / msn: 881 First flight: 1966-09-03 (5 years 8 months) Total airframe hrs: 18586 Engines:Rolls-Royce Conway 550 Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 11 Passengers: Fatalities: 35 / Occupants: 96 Total: Fatalities: 43 / Occupants: 107 Airplane damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: Addis Ababa-Bole Airport (ADD) (   Ethiopia) Phase: Takeoff (TOF) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Addis Ababa-Haile Selassie I International Airport (ADD/HAAB), Ethiopia Destination airport: Roma-Fiumicino Airport (FCO/LIRF), Italy Flightnumber: 720

Narrative:
East African Airways Flight EC-720 to London via Addis Ababa and Rome departed Nairobi at 06:55 hours. The flight to Addis Ababa was uneventful and the VC10 landed there at 08:23. During the transit stop at Addis Ababa, some freight was off-loaded together with 40 passengers. Fifteen passengers joined the flight and the airplane was refuelled. Start up clearance was given at 09:21 hours and the aircraft taxied out six minutes later via the eastern taxiway for takeoff on runway 07. The tower advised the aircraft that the wind was 5 knots and variable in direction. At 09:32 hours, as the aircraft was backtracking to the takeoff point, the pilot reported a number of dead birds on the runway. He requested that these birds be removed before the aircraft took off. A fire truck was dispatched to take care of this. The aircraft continued to backtrack down the runway and turned in the pad at the end. It then lined up on the runway and stopped a short distance from the threshold. At 09:38:40 hours, the tower cleared the aircraft for takeoff. Shortly after the aircraft had passed the mid-point of the runway, at or just below the V1 speed, the nose wheel ran over a steel jacking pad. This jacking pad belonged to a Cessna 185 that had departed 4:40 earlier. The pad punctured the right hand nose wheel tire. A loud bang was heard and severe vibration was felt on the flight deck. Almost immediately after the nose wheel tire had burst, the nose of the aircraft rose momentarily and then come down. The flight crew decided to abort the takeoff. The engines were throttled back and reverse thrust was selected. The aircraft continued down the runway, veering slightly to the right. Then the no.1 rear main tire burst. Just before the aircraft reached the end of the runway, it veered slightly to the left and ran approximately parallel to the centre line. After crossing a storm drain located at the end of the runway at right angles to the centre line, the aircraft became momentarily airborne as it left the lip of the embankment on which the 60 m stopway was laid. As it did so, the left outer wing of the aircraft struck a steel lattice tower forming part of the approach lighting system to runway 25. This ruptured the no. 1A fuel tank and the released fuel promptly ignited. Sixty metres beyond the end of the runway the aircraft fell heavily on to the lower ground 10.6 m below the runway level. It broke up immediately on impact and after sliding a short distance, came to rest and caught fire.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The accident was due to a partial loss of braking effort arising from incorrect re-assembly of part of the braking system, as a result of which the aircraft could not be stopped within the emergency distance remaining following a properly executed abandoned take-off procedure.”

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