ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Historic plane Catalina makes emergency landing at Lelystad Airport

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 08:26

Lelystad 

August 15, 2017

The historic plane the Catalina (PH-PBY) has made a successful emergency landing at its home base Lelystad Airport. 

Just after 14:00, the crew reported that the landing gear refused and that a landing had to be made. The fire department in Lelystad expanded with large equipment to intervene in case of emergency. At 14:30 the pilot of emergency landing introduced the 76 year old device. First he landed on his wheels to slow down later on his nose.

The Catalina is a watercraft and it is also considered to allow the device to land on water. Eventually, the runway was chosen because it would be safer. The device is strong enough for a belly landing.

The plane came back from the India Memorial in The Hague. At the Indian Monument, the victims were reminded of the Japanese occupation in Dutch-India during the Second World War on Tuesday. The historic plane Catalina flew at that memorial.

Because of the anniversary, there were also 15 people on board besides three crew members. They were allowed to fly during the commemoration. Everyone has been able to leave the plane unharmed. They were taken to the airport by bus.

The device is switched off as soon as possible from the runway. Because of the anniversary, there were also 15 people on board besides three crew members. They were allowed to fly during the commemoration. Everyone has been able to leave the plane unharmed. They were taken to the airport by bus. The device is switched off as soon as possible from the runway. Because of the anniversary, there were also 15 people on board besides three crew members. They were allowed to fly during the commemoration. Everyone has been able to leave the plane unharmed. They were taken to the airport by bus. The device is switched off as soon as possible from the runway.

https://youtu.be/w6yii_Leu50

Lelystad 

August 15, 2017

The historic plane the Catalina (PH-PBY) has made a successful emergency landing at its home base Lelystad Airport.

Just after 14:00, the crew reported that the landing gear refused and that a landing had to be made. The fire department in Lelystad expanded with large equipment to intervene in case of emergency. At 14:30 the pilot of emergency landing introduced the 76 year old device. First he landed on his wheels to slow down later on his nose.

The Catalina is a watercraft and it is also considered to allow the device to land on water. Eventually, the runway was chosen because it would be safer. The device is strong enough for a belly landing.

The plane came back from the India Memorial in The Hague. At the Indian Monument, the victims were reminded of the Japanese occupation in Dutch-India during the Second World War on Tuesday. The historic plane Catalina flew at that memorial.

Because of the anniversary, there were also 15 people on board besides three crew members. They were allowed to fly during the commemoration. Everyone has been able to leave the plane unharmed. They were taken to the airport by bus.

The device is switched off as soon as possible from the runway. Because of the anniversary, there were also 15 people on board besides three crew members. They were allowed to fly during the commemoration. Everyone has been able to leave the plane unharmed. They were taken to the airport by bus. The device is switched off as soon as possible from the runway. Because of the anniversary, there were also 15 people on board besides three crew members. They were allowed to fly during the commemoration. Everyone has been able to leave the plane unharmed. They were taken to the airport by bus. The device is switched off as soon as possible from the runway.

https://youtu.be/w6yii_Leu50

http://www.omroepflevoland.nl/nieuws/150338/lelystad-historisch-vliegtuig-catalina-maakt-noodlanding-op-lelystad-airport

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Fire-suppression error sends foam pouring out of Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport hangar

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 08:24

AUBURN — Firefighters responding to the Lufthansa hangar at the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport on Monday morning walked into a wall of foam over their heads after a malfunction in the fire suppression system filled the building with foam and briefly trapped four people inside.

Foam covers the ground Monday morning surrounding a hangar at the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport.

“Apparently, they were working on the system when there was an error,” Fire Chief Geoff Low said. “When it discharged, it filled the entire hangar. We did have some initial reports of some people that were lost inside. We were able to locate them — they were up on an upper level, so they were able to actually stay out of the product and we were able to get them down.”

A few people were covered in foam and some inhaled it. Two were taken to the hospital, Low said.

“Safety is always of the utmost importance to us and so we take this quite seriously,” Lufthansa spokesman Tal Muscal said. “Thankfully no serious injuries were reported.”

The call initially came in around 9 a.m. Don Stevens, part of an Auburn Water and Sewer District crew doing routine work to a sewer pump station by the airport fence, said first he heard what sounded like a generator firing up.

“We look over and (foam) just starts pouring out all the doors, all the way around,” Stevens said. “We all took a five-minute break to watch.”

At one point, a truck driving through the foam appeared to hit the building. Foam poured onto the lawn around the hangar and onto cars in the parking lot, looking like out-of-season snowbanks.

“We thought it was going to take out the port-a-potties (right outside the hangar),” he said.”It was going right by it.”

The Department of Environmental Protection and the local water district have been alerted, Low said.

The high-expansion foam is made by Ansul.

“There’s a fair amount of air in it, it’s relatively easy to move through it, but it will engulf a person if it’s up over their head,” Low said. “When we talked to the reps at Ansul, they conveyed that it’s essentially a dish detergent and basically (once someone comes in contact with it), it’s a simple flushing of the person, get them a shower and get them cleaned up.”

Foam covers the ground Monday morning surrounding a hangar at the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport.

He estimated foam reached 20 to 25 feet high inside the hangar. Lufthansa Technik has been restoring a Lockheed Super Star Constellation aircraft at the site and Low said one plane was inside the building being repaired when the system went off.

Low anticipated damages between the foam and water from the sprinklers that followed.

Muscal said he didn’t have any knowledge of damage to the Super Star Constellation being restored there.

Eyewitness Cassie Gagnon, who lives in Lewiston, was hired last week by a staffing agency for a three- to four-week job to help move material from one hangar to another.

She was on her way back to the Constellation and “people were running out of the hangar and I could see a massive wall of foam coming out.”

She said she had no idea what was going on, but that the people around her were more shocked and anxious than scared.

“We all stood outside and we waited” for instructions on decontamination, Gagnon said, and after about 45 minutes, she and others were cleared to leave the property.

They did not return to work Monday.

Firefighters cleared the airport at 12:30 p.m. when the company got the OK from DEP to go back in and start clearing foam from the building, according to a fire captain.

kskelton@sunjournal.com

http://www.sunjournal.com/news/lewiston-auburn/2017/08/14/fire-suppression-error-sends-foam-pouring-out-airport-hangar/2181349

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U.S. Airman Forced to Belly-Land A-10 Warthog After Canopy Blows, Landing Gear Fails

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 08:22

“In that moment, your training kicks in. The training—that’s what saves you and your wingman.”

By Jay Bennett

Aug 15, 2017

On July 20, Capt. Brett DeVries of the Michigan Air National Guard was forced to land his A-10 Warthog with the landing gear up and no canopy after the aircraft’s gun malfunctioned, wreaking havoc on systems across the entire plane. The belly landing took place at the Alpena Combat Readiness Training Center in northern Michigan. DeVries, an A-10 pilot with the 107th Fighter Squadron stationed at Selfridge Air National Guard Base just north of Detroit, was able to safely exit the aircraft after the emergency landing, and no injuries resulted from the incident. 

DeVries and fellow airmen from the 107th, known as the “Red Devils,” were on a training flight to drop dummy bombs and conduct strafe runs at Grayling Air Gunnery Range. Four A-10s dropped their dummy ordnance during the routine training flight and then circled around to make a strafing pass. On his strafing run, DeVries’ A-10 Thunderbolt II, affectionately called the Warthog for its rugged appearance, suffered a major malfunction after the aircraft’s 30mm GAU-8 Avenger Gatling-style autocannon blew out, creating a “donut of gas,” as reported by DeVries’ wingman Major Shannon Vickers. The malfunction caused the canopy of DeVries’ A-10 to blow while flying about 325 knots (374 mph), slamming his head back into the cockpit seat.

“It was like someone sucker punched me,” DeVries recalls in a recent report of the incident. “I was just dazed for a moment.”

After quickly gathering his senses, DeVries instinctively pulled his aircraft up from only about 150 feet altitude to 2,000 feet to distance himself from the ground. The seasoned A-10 pilot, who has flown 119 combat missions overseas and hundreds of training runs up to the Grayling range, lowered his seat and leaned forward to duck under the front window of the cockpit, avoiding the worst of the wind.

His wingman, Vickers, saw DeVries leave the formation after his gun malfunctioned, but did not immediately see that the canopy had blown. Vickers flew up to support DeVries by inspecting his aircraft for damage and assisting with radio communication to technicians on the ground. DeVries’ aircraft was in bad shape, with paneling missing from the underside around the gun and his two primary radios cut out, forcing DeVries to rely on a third-option radio system. To add to the chaos, DeVries’ maps and checklists were blown all over the place with no canopy to block the wind.

“There was paper everywhere. And I was afraid to open up my emergency checklist, because I knew that would just blow away and maybe get sucked into an engine,” DeVries recalled.

DeVries feared the blown canopy and faulty gun could have damaged the ejection system as well. If he pulled the ejection levers, the system could fail—or, even worse, work only partially, with disastrous effects if DeVries were not cleanly ejected from the aircraft.

After conferring with his wingman Vickers—a Warthog pilot of 10 years as well as a former weapons specialist who worked on A-10s—DeVries opted to fly his crippled aircraft to the Alpena airfield, only a few minutes away by air, and attempt an emergency landing. Within minutes, the Alpena radio tower had contacted Selfridge ANGB, about 250 miles to the south, and several A-10 maintenance specialists there gathered around a speakerphone. The mechanics provided recommendations that were relayed by the Alpena tower to Vickers, and then on to DeVries who had lost his primary and first backup radios.

The primary concern was whether or not DeVries should attempt to lower his landing gear. If it deployed properly, the landing gear would make the touchdown at Alpena much easier and safer. However, if only part of the gear lowered, a landing attempt would be significantly more dangerous than bringing the ship in with the landing gear up for a belly flop landing.

“I just thought, ‘There is no way this is happening right now.’ It all was sort of surreal, but at the same time, we were 100 percent focused on the task ahead of us,” Vickers said.

Vickers flew under DeVries to within about an arm’s length. DeVries attempted to lower the landing gear, but as they feared, the nose gear did not come down due to damage from the gun. Vickers quickly shouted into the radio, “Gear up!” and fortunately the rear landing gear returned to the up position.

The two Red Devils approached the runway at Alpena. DeVries prepared to land his Hog with the landing gear up, although on the A-10, the primary landing gear wheels are exposed even in the up position, as the designers of the aircraft accounted for the fact that the heavy attack plane would inevitably need to make some landings after taking damage. “As he made final approach, I felt confident he was making the right decision,” Vickers said. “We had talked through every possibility and now he was going to land it.”

DeVries pulled off a textbook emergency landing. “I flew him down, calling out his altitude,” Vickers said. “He came in flat, I mean it was a very smooth landing.”

As Vickers pulled away, he saw DeVries exit the aircraft and dash to a nearby firetruck. Vickers was then instructed to fly back to Selfridge, only 35 minutes to the south, but the pilot said the flight felt like hours.

Thanks to DeVries’ skilled landing, not only did the he walk away from the incident unscathed, but the damaged A-10 will likely be repaired and returned to service as well.

“Capt. DeVries skills as a pilot were put to the test in this incident,” said Brig. Gen. John D. Slocum, a veteran fighter pilot who now commands the 127th Wing . “He demonstrated not only superior skill as a pilot but remained calm in an extremely challenging situation. To walk away from this scenario with no injuries is a true testament to his abilities as a world-class fighter pilot.”

DeVries received an email from Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein congratulating him on the landing. As for DeVries, he credits his training. The landing was conducted entirely on instinct.

“In that moment, your training kicks in. The training—that’s what saves you and your wingman,” he said. “Sometimes, perhaps we think, ‘Why do we have to do this training again and again?’ Well, in this case, the training took over and it is what made the difference.”

Source: U.S. Air National Guard

http://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/news/a27761/belly-land-a-10-warthog/

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NTSB Cites Cardiac Arrest In Fatal Helicopter Accident

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 08:19

Robinson R44 Destroyed By Impact With Terrain

The NTSB has released its probable cause report from an accident which occurred in May, 2014 that fatally injured the pilot of a Robinson R44 aircraft. The Board said the accident was likely caused by the sudden onset of cardiac arrest. 

According to the report, The accident flight was one of several recent practice external-load flights that the pilot had been conducting with a 150-ft long-line and weighted barrel. The helicopter approached the airport from the north and then hovered over the approach end of runway 20R. At the time, two airplanes were in the airport traffic pattern for runway 20R, another was in the airport vicinity, and a fourth was departing from runway 2R toward the hovering helicopter. One witness reported hearing the accident pilot attempt to communicate with the departing northbound airplane, but no response was heard, and the airplane passed close to the helicopter. After the northbound airplane passed by, the helicopter moved to its normal landing area on the east ramp, and the accident pilot responded to another pilot’s query as to his intentions by stating that he was landing. Immediately after the pilot’s response, the helicopter suddenly pitched up, rolled left, and descended to the ground.

Examination of the helicopter revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical anomalies with the airframe, systems, or powerplant. Damage to the main rotor and associated ground scars and wreckage distribution were consistent with the rotor system operating at normal rpm during the impact sequence. Damage to the helicopter and the location of the main rotor ground scar were consistent with the helicopter having collided with the ground in an extreme left roll. The long-line remained attached to the barrel but was not attached to the helicopter’s cargo hook, and the disconnected end was near the main wreckage. The relative orientation of the long-line and the main wreckage indicated that the line was still attached to the helicopter when the helicopter moved laterally at some point; however, no known witness observed when or how smoothly the line and load were released.

Maneuvering a helicopter to land during external load operations requires precision in both helicopter control and timing of load release. Although the accident pilot’s workload was increased by the demands of maintaining traffic separation and communicating on the radio in the busy, nontowered airport environment, there was no evidence to suggest that such an operation was beyond his skill level, particularly given his recent practice. The accident pilot was based at BCV and, in the 2 weeks before the accident, had conducted seven flights (including the accident flight) with a 150-foot long-line in the accident helicopter; in the preceding 90 days, the pilot had flown almost 60 hours, most of which involved autorotations, hover maneuvers, and long-line practice.

The pilot’s autopsy identified severe coronary artery disease with greater than 75% stenosis in two main arteries. In addition, scarring in the left ventricle was identified, which indicated that the pilot had experienced a previous heart attack. Although the pilot had sought and received in recent years medical care that included cardiac testing, there is no evidence that his previous heart attack was ever diagnosed (research has shown that the tests are not always accurate), and he was not taking any preventive medication. Given the presence of two severely stenotic lesions in two main arteries, the presence of scarring from a previous heart attack, and the absence of medication to prevent a recurrent cardiac event, the accident pilot’s likelihood for experiencing another acute cardiac event was inevitable. An acute cardiac event would likely leave no identifiable evidence on autopsy and cause symptoms ranging in severity from impairing (such as chest pain and shortness of breath or palpitations) to incapacitating (fainting from low blood pressure or sudden cardiac death). Considering the precision required while maneuvering to land with an external load, any level of impairment could result in catastrophic consequences; therefore, the pilot likely experienced a sudden, acute cardiac event that adversely affected his performance.

The NTSB determined the probable cause of this accident to be the pilot’s loss of control of the helicopter due to impairment or incapacitation from a sudden, acute cardiac event.

(Image from file. Not accident aircraft)

FMI: Report

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Woman sues Delta over frightening LaGuardia plane crash

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 08:17

Posted on August 15, 2017

By Anthony G. Attrino

HACKENSACK – A Westwood woman has sued Delta Airlines, claiming she was injured two years ago when the plane she was on crash-landed due to pilot error on a snowy runway at LaGuardia Airport. 

Ashley Pronovost, 19, claims in court papers she was a passenger on Flight 1086, which flew from Atlanta to New York – skidding off a runway and striking an airport perimeter fence about 11 a.m. on March 5, 2015.

The plane came to rest with its “nose on an embankment hovering over Flushing Bay with its left wing broken and spewing fuel,” according to the suit filed in Bergen County Superior Court.

There were 127 passengers on board. Twenty-nine of them suffered minor injuries, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

Pronovost, who is now a student at Quinnipiac University, claims she suffered “physical and psychological personal injuries with resultant medical expenses.”

The suit claims the student has suffered a loss of income along with reduced earning capacity, pain and suffering, and an impairment of her quality of life.

The lawsuit was filed Aug. 7 by attorney Gerald H. Baker of Springfield. In addition to Delta Airlines, Baker blames the captain, first officer and flight crew for negligence that resulted in the crash. 

The captain, who is not named in court documents, was under “situational stress resulting from his concern about stopping performance,” the suit states.

In September 2016, the NTSB determined the accident was due to the captain’s excessive reversing of the engines while braking. The technique rendered the rudder ineffective and caused a loss of control, the NTSB said.

The lawsuit states the captain had “attentional limitations due to the high workload during the landing, which prevented him from immediately recognizing the use of excessive reverse thrust.”

Pronovost is seeking a jury trial and unspecified compensatory damages, along with attorney fees and interest.

Delta Airlines did not return a call seeking comment.

http://www.nj.com/bergen/index.ssf/2017/08/woman_sues_delta_over_frightening_laguardia_plane_crash.html

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30th anniversary of deadly Flight 255 crash at Detroit Metro Airport

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 08:15

One young child survived the 1987 crash

Matthew Smith

ROMULUS, Mich. (WXYZ) – It’s been 30 years since the deadliest plane crash in Michigan history.

On August 16, 1987, Flight 255 took off from Romulus headed for Arizona — it didn’t make it far.

Investigators blame a number of pilot errors on the crash, but the most important takeaway is the lives lost: 156 people were killed that day, all but one person on-board and two people who were in vehicles near I-94 and Middlebelt Road.

The firefighters who arrived that night had no idea what lied ahead. The initial call for a plane crash shed little light on the fact that it was a passenger plane — Lt. John Thiede, of the Romulus Fire Department, explained his rescue efforts to 7 Action News in 2013. He explained that he and another firefighter had heard a faint moan, or cry, and were trying to locate where it was coming from.

“I was checking three or four passengers, after about the fourth one I saw a chair upside down,” explained Thiede. “I moved the chair to the right and checked the lady underneath, there was no vital signs on her then I saw the arm coming out of the chair.”

That arm belonged to Cecelia Cichan — she’s since married and now goes by Cecelia Crocker.

At the time she was burned and bruised, but alive. Thiede helped her to safety — the stretcher used to carry her to safety still hangs in the Romulus Fire Department. Years later the pair began speaking online, and he’s since attended her wedding and been a lasting impression in her life.

Crocker explained that it took a long time to come to terms with being the only survivor of the crash that killed her brother and parents.

“I think about the accident every day. It’s kind of hard not to think about it when I look in the mirror,” she said, in the documentary ‘Sole Survivor’ which originally aired on CNN. “I have visual scars. My arms and my legs. And I have a scar on my forehead.”

She also sports an airplane tattoo on her left wrist — a reminder of where she’s come from.

“So many scars were put on my body against my will, and I decided to put this on my body for myself,” she said.

Flight 255 crashed mere moments after takeoff at 8:46 p.m. The plane tilted and struck a light pole — the wreckage stretched across Middlebelt Road near I-94.

A memorial ceremony is expected to be held Wednesday night at the exact time the plane crashed. That ceremony will be held at a memorial that was erected in the median between the I-94 east on-ramp off of Middlebelt Road. Hidden by trees the large granite structure has the names of all 156 people killed.

http://www.wxyz.com/news/156-lives-lost-in-deadly-crash-30-years-ago-today

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 08:13

30 Years ago today: On 16 August 1987 a Northwest MD-82 crashed onto a highway while taking off from Detroit, killing 156 people.

Date: Sunday 16 August 1987 Time: 20:45 Type: McDonnell Douglas DC-9-82 (MD-82) Operator: Northwest Airlines Registration: N312RC C/n / msn: 48090/1040 First flight: 1981 Total airframe hrs: 14928 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-217 Crew: Fatalities: 6 / Occupants: 6 Passengers: Fatalities: 148 / Occupants: 149 Total: Fatalities: 154 / Occupants: 155 Ground casualties: Fatalities: 2 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Detroit-Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, MI (DTW) (   United States of America) Phase: Takeoff (TOF) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Detroit-Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, MI (DTW/KDTW), United States of America Destination airport: Phoenix-Sky Harbor International Airport, AZ (PHX/KPHX), United States of America Flightnumber: NW255

Narrative:
A McDonnell Douglas DC-9-82 operating Northwest Airlines flight 255 was destroyed when it crashed onto a road during takeoff from Detroit-Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, Michigan, USA. Just one of the 155 occupants survived te accident. Additionally, Two persons on the ground were killed.
Flight NW255 was a regularly scheduled passenger flight between Saginaw, Michigan and Santa Ana, California, with en route stops at Detroit and Phoenix, Arizona. About 18:53, flight 255 departed Saginaw and about 19:42 arrived at its gate at Detroit.
About 20:32, flight 255 departed the gate with 149 passengers and 6 crewmembers on board. During the pushback, the flightcrew accomplished the BEFORE (engine) START portion of the airplane checklist, and, at 20:33, they began starting the engines. The flight was then cleared to “taxi via the ramp, hold short of (taxiway) delta and expect runway three center [3C] (for takeoff)…” The ground controller amended the clearance, stating that the flight had to exit the ramp at taxiway Charlie. The crew was requested to change radio frequencies. The first officer repeated the taxi clearance, but he did not repeat the new radio frequency nor did he tune the radio to the new frequency.
At 20:37, the captain asked the first officer if they could use runway 3C for takeoff as they had initially expected 21L or 21R. After consulting the Runway Takeoff Weight Chart Manual, the first officer told the captain runway 3C could be used for takeoff.
During the taxi out, the captain missed the turnoff at taxiway C. When the first officer contacted ground control, the ground controller redirected them to taxi to runway 3C and again requested that they change radio frequencies. The first officer repeated the new frequency, changed over, and contacted the east ground controller. The east ground controller gave the flight a new taxi route to runway 3C, told them that windshear alerts were in effect, and that the altimeter setting was 29.85 inHg. The flightcrew acknowledged receipt of the information.
At 20:42, the local controller cleared flight 255 to taxi into position on runway 3C and to hold. He told the flight there would be a 3-minute delay in order to get the required “in-trail separation behind traffic just departing.” At 20:44:04, flight 255 was cleared for takeoff.
Rngine power began increasing at 20:44:21. The flightcrew could not engage the autothrottle system at first, but, at 20:44:38, they did engage the system, and the first officer called 100 knots at 20:44:45. At 20:44:57, the first officer called “Rotate.” Eight seconds later, the stall warning stick shaker activated, accompanied by voice warnings of the supplemental stall recognition system (SSRS). The takeoff warning system indicating that the airplane was not configured properly for takeoff, did not sound at any time prior or during takeoff.
After flight 255 became airborne it began rolling to the left and right before the left wing hit a light pole in a rental car lot.
After impacting the light pole, flight 255 continued to roll to the left, continued across the car lot, struck a light pole in a second rental car lot, and struck the side wall of the roof of the auto rental facility in the second rental car lot. The airplane continued rolling to the left when it impacted the ground on a road outside the airport boundary. The airplane continued to slide along the road, struck a railroad embankment, and disintegrated as it slid along the ground.
Fires erupted in airplane components scattered along the wreckage path. Three occupied vehicles on the road and numerous vacant vehicles in the auto rental parking lot along the airplane’s path were destroyed by impact forces and or fire. One passenger, a 4-year-old child was injured seriously.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The flight crew’s failure to use the taxi checklist to ensure that the flaps and slats were extended for take-off. Contributing the accident was the absence of electrical power to the airplane take-off warning system which thus did not warn the flight crew that the airplane was not configured properly for take-off. The reason for the absence of electrical power could not be determined.”

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Today is Tuesday the 15th of August, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 06:32

Here are your stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Pilot identified in morning plane crash south of Marshall

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 06:30

PANOLA COUNTY, TX (KLTV) –

The pilot involved in a plane crash this morning has been identified.

Charles Flay Mayo, 60, of Jefferson, and retired Captain of the Marshall Fire Department, was piloting the plane Monday when it crashed south of Marshall.

Mayo was taken to  Good Shepherd hospital with a severe laceration to his head.

DPS officials said troopers are currently on scene awaiting the arrival of FAA.

About 11 a.m., crews responded to a location off of Highway 59, south of Marshall in response to a crash.

Harrison and Panola County officials, Marshall Fire EMS, Carthage Fire Department, Beckville Fire Department, DPS, and Allegiance EMS responded to the crash, which occurred near the Harrison-Panola county border line.

DPS says Mayo reported to emergency officials that he had crashed his small plane while checking pipelines.

The plane is registered out of Arbela, Missouri and has been identified as a Piper Model PA22135 fixed wing single engine.

http://www.telemundoamarillo.com/story/36130285/pilot-located-being-transported-to-hospital-after-plane-crash-south-of-marshall

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Small plane crashes near Coghlan Island; no injuries reported

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 06:29

Four passengers, pilot swam ashore after reported engine trouble

An Alaska Seaplanes floatplane crashed Monday morning near Coghlan Island in Auke Bay on a flight from Skagway to Juneau, but its four passengers and pilot are uninjured.

Capital City Fire/Rescue Assistant Fire Chief Ed Quinto confirmed the five people were wet — they had to swim to the island — but unharmed.

According to the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center, the small plane’s automated distress beacon activated at 6:35 a.m., not long after its pilot radioed the Juneau airport and reported engine trouble. That account of events was confirmed in a press release from Carl Ramseth, general manager of Alaska Seaplanes.

National Transportation Safety Board aviation accident investigator Noreen Price is working with a Federal Aviation Administration investigator in Juneau to determine what happened. Price interviewed 33-year-old pilot Joshua Dee Poirer by phone soon after the accident.

“He had a complete loss of engine power,” she said.

Three miles from the airport and nearing ground level, Poirer had no way to reach the runway. He turned the plane and ditched in the ocean about 80 feet from the eastern shore of Coghlan Island.

“The pilot did a great job of managing this,” Price said.

Quinto said by phone that his department received a call for help as this was happening. Rescue crews went to Don D. Statter Memorial Harbor and prepared to help, but the pilot and passengers “were close enough to shore that all five people were able to swim to shore,” Quinto said.

A Temsco helicopter also responded and confirmed all five were on Coghlan Island, Quinto said.

Price said the accident happened so quickly that neither the passengers nor the pilot had time to don life jackets.

“By the time they knew they were ditching in water, it was too late,” she said.

According to Alaska State Troopers, an Alaska Seaplanes floatplane picked up all four passengers from Coghlan Island while the pilot, Poirier, remained on the beach before being picked up by Coastal Helicopters.

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class John Paul Rios said the Coast Guard was preparing to assist as well, but by the time it arrived on scene, the passengers had already been picked up. Quinto said the passengers were taken to Alaska Seaplanes’ facility in Juneau, where they were examined by medics and found to be unharmed.

The plane sank after landing in the water, Troopers said.

In his press release, Ramseth said the National Transportation Safety Board has released custody of the plane back to Alaska Seaplanes, allowing it to be recovered, “and we’ll be cooperating with them to determine the cause of the accident. We commend the actions of the pilot through this emergency and are very thankful for the outcome.”

The Coast Guard team responding to the crash was subsequently sent (with Troopers and SEADOGS) to assist a missing hiker on Sullivan Island, just south of the Chilkat Peninsula. That hiker was found on the beach unharmed by a good Samaritan boat, said Coast Guard Petty Officer Charly Hengen.

The crashed plane was a Cessna 207 built in 1974 and registered to Kalinin Partners, LLC. The plane’s last airworthiness certificate was dated Sept. 25, 2015 and was scheduled to expire in September 2018.

Price said the plane will be taken to a hangar where the FAA investigator and NTSB will examine it and the plane’s maintenance records to determine what caused the accident.

She added that the crash should remind passengers to dress for outside conditions and listen to their emergency briefings: No one expects an emergency, but it doesn’t hurt to be prepared.

http://juneauempire.com/news/local/2017-08-14/small-plane-crashes-near-coghlan-island-no-injuries-reported

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NTSB: No distress call in Charlottesville helicopter crash

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 06:28

There was no distress call, according to federal safety investigators looking into what caused a helicopter crash that killed two Virginia State Police officers as they were conducting surveillance work during the white nationalists’ rally in Charlottesville on Saturday.

Jay Cullen and Berke Bates were killed in the crash. According to investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board, the helicopter left Charlottesville airport about 3:54 p.m. and was conducting surveillance over the downtown area. It left downtown Charlottesville at about 4:42 p.m. to provide support for the motorcade of Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D). About two minutes later, at 4:44 p.m., officials received the first 911 call reporting the crash.

According to the report, the helicopter’s vertical flight path was about 45 degrees when it descended into trees. Investigators said the main wreckage was about 100 yards from where the aft portion of the tail boom became lodged in a tree.

Investigators said that the helicopter was traveling about 34 mph at an altitude of 2,300 feet. The crash occurred in a wooded area on Old Farm Road in Albemarle County, about seven miles southwest of the Charlottesville airport. There was a post-crash fire, investigators said.

NTSB investigators and Virginia State Police are continuing to interview witnesses who reported seeing the helicopter shortly before it crashed. A preliminary report will be available within two to three weeks, according to the NTSB. The full investigation is expected to take 12 to 18 months.

Cullen, 48, was commander of the State Police Aviation Unit. He was a veteran pilot who spent several years shepherding the governor around Virginia. Bates, who would have turned 41 on Sunday, was just beginning to realize a lifelong dream of becoming a helicopter pilot.

McAuliffe knew both men.

Correction: This post initially said that NTSB investigators reported no post-crash fire. There was such a fire. The post has been corrected and updated.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/dr-gridlock/wp/2017/08/14/ntsb-no-distress-call-or-post-crash-fire-in-helicopter-crash-that-killed-2-virginia-state-police-troopers/?utm_term=.0d2f7e55edd3

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Doctor Saves Woman Who Reportedly Overdosed During Spirit Airlines Flight

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 06:23

A local doctor was credited with saving a life this week after he helped a woman who is believed to have overdosed Friday on a Minneapolis-bound Spirit Airlines flight from Boston. Dr. Anil Punjabi, a Boston cardiologist, and a number of other crew and passengers worked to keep the woman alive for 25 minutes as the plane made an emergency landing.

The woman, who was not identified, visited the plane’s lavatory for a lengthy period of time before other passengers alerted crew aboard the flight, Fox-affiliate WFXT reported Monday. When she returned to her seat, she was slumped over and began turning gray before passengers realized the woman wasn’t breathing. That’s when Punjabi was called to help.

Working with Punjabi, the crew and nurse — as well as an EMT trainee — worked to keep the woman breathing by administering CPR for the better part of half an hour before the plane could safely land. While attempting to keep her alive, they allegedly found a needle hidden in the woman’s bra.

“We were down on the ground within 25 minutes, but at that time she was completely unresponsive,” Punjabi told the station.

He added, “It’s not an uncommon sight. Even if you walk around Boston, you know there are certain areas you know that are affected by this more than others. It was actually pretty shocking that this would happen on a plane.”

Pointing to the prevalence of the opioid epidemic, Punjabi said that Narcan — which is used for opioid overdoses — is a necessary tool for airline staff to be able to effectively treat passengers who suffer overdoses aboard flights.

The number of opioid-related overdoses that resulted in death has more than quadrupled since 1999, according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC reported in 2015 that an estimated 91 Americans die daily from an opioid overdose, which includes prescriptions opioids and heroin — but that figure could actually be significantly higher.

As International Business Times previously reported, the American Journal of Preventive Medicine published a new study earlier this month revealing opioid- and heroin-related deaths nationwide to be 24 percent and 22 percent higher, respectively, than previously reported.

A representative for Spirit Airlines did not immediately return International Business Times’ request for comment.

http://www.ibtimes.com/doctor-saves-woman-who-reportedly-overdosed-during-spirit-airlines-flight-2578501

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Rotor Blade Separation Cited In 2015 Fatal Helicopter Accident

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 06:21

NTSB Releases Probable Cause Report, Two Fatally Injured

The NTSB has released its probable cause report from an accident which occurred in January, 2015 that resulted in the fatal injury of two people on board an Enstrom 280FX helicopter. The board said on of the three main rotor blades on the aircraft separated from the rotor head, leading to the accident. 

According to the report, the flight instructor and the student pilot were conducting a local instructional flight in the helicopter. The helicopter was on final approach to land when one of the three main rotor blades (#2 blade) separated from the main rotor head. The main transmission and main rotor head (with #1 and #3 blades still attached) then separated from the helicopter, and the helicopter descended to ground impact. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the separation of the #2 blade was due to fracture of the #2 main rotor blade spindle.

The #2 spindle fractured at the inboard end of the threads. Metallurgical analysis of the fractured spindle revealed signatures consistent with a fatigue crack initiating from multiple origins that propagated across 92% of the spindle cross-section; the remaining 8% of the fracture surface exhibited signatures consistent with overload. The high percentage of stable fatigue fracture growth versus overload suggested that low loading propagated the crack.

Further, corrosion was visible on the fracture surface in the fatigue initiation area, which indicated that the crack had been present and growing for some time. Similar fatigue cracks were observed emanating from thread roots on the #1 and #3 spindles; the crack in the #3 spindle emanated from the inboard-most thread, similar to the crack in the #2 spindle, and the crack in the #1 spindle emanated from the cotter pin hole. Both of these cracks were shorter than the crack in the #2 spindle, and the fatigue on their fracture surfaces had only propagated a small amount through the #1 and #3 spindle cross-sections.

The root radii of the threads on all three of the spindles did not meet the thread form specified on the manufacturer’s drawing. Cross-sections of the threads from the three spindles showed that the #2 spindle and the #3 spindle had flat-bottomed threads; the #1 spindle did not have flat-bottomed threads but had threads with a sharper than specified root radius. A subsequent finite element analysis determined that the flat-bottomed threads and the sharper than specified root radius threads would result in higher stresses at the threads, which likely contributed to the crack initiation within the threads.

Further, the investigation determined that the predicted loads used in the original fatigue analysis during the design of the spindle did not account for a bending load at the spindle threads. The omission of bending loads during design and the flat-bottom quality of the threads led to stresses greater than used in the original fatigue life calculation by the manufacturer. Further, the finite element analysis of the spindle revealed that, once a crack has initiated, the bending loads at the spindle threads would be sufficient to propagate the crack at a rate similar to that of the total time accumulated on the #2 spindle (about 9,300 flight hours).

Before the accident, the spindle was not a life-limited part, and there were no recurrent inspections specified for the spindle threads, resulting in a low likelihood of the operator detecting the fatigue fracture within the spindle threads before the accident. Following this accident, the manufacturer released a service directive bulletin and the Federal Aviation Administration released an airworthiness directive that require a magnetic particle inspection of spindles with 1,500 hours or more time in service.

The NTSB determined the probable cause of this accident to be an in-flight failure of the helicopter’s #2 main rotor spindle due to undetected fatigue cracking, which resulted in an in-flight breakup. Contributing to failure were the nonconforming thread root radius of the spindle and the manufacturer’s failure to include a bending moment within the spindle threads when performing the fatigue analysis during initial design of the spindle.

(Image from file. Not accident aircraft)

FMI: Report

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 06:19

41 Years ago today: On 15 August 1976 a SAETA Vickers 785D Viscount went missing with 59 people on board on a flight from Quito to Cuenca, Ecuador.

Date: Sunday 15 August 1976 Time: ca 08:35 Type: Vickers 785D Viscount Operator: SAETA Registration: HC-ARS C/n / msn: 377 First flight: 1958 Crew: Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4 Passengers: Fatalities: 55 / Occupants: 55 Total: Fatalities: 59 / Occupants: 59 Airplane damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: Chimborazo Volcano (   Ecuador) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Quito-Mariscal Sucre Airport (UIO/SEQU), Ecuador Destination airport: Cuenca Airport (CUE/SECU), Ecuador Flightnumber: 232

Narrative:
A Vickers 785D Viscount, operated by SAETA, was destroyed when it impacted the side of a volcano in Ecuador. All 59 on board were killed.
Flight 232 departed Quito-Mariscal Sucre Airport, Ecuador at 08:06 hours on a domestic service to Cuenca Airport. Last radio contact with the flight was at 08:27 when the crew reported over Ambato at 18000 feet.
The aircraft failed to arrive at Cuenca. Despite an intesive search operation, the wreckage was not found.

However, on October 17, 2002 climbers attempting to reach the top of the 20,700-foot Chimborazo Volcano, came across aircraft debris. Further investigation by officials in February 2003 confirmed that the wreckage was indeed SAETA flight 232.

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Today is Monday the 14th of August, 2017

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 10:27

Here are the stories to start the new week…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Two state police pilots killed in Charlottesville helicopter crash

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 10:26

By MIKE BARBER – Richmond Times-Dispatch

CHARLOTTESVILLE — A Virginia State Police helicopter helping law enforcement officers monitor the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville crashed in Albemarle County on Saturday, killing the two people on board. 

The pilot, Lt. H. Jay Cullen, 48, of Midlothian, and trooper-pilot Berke M.M. Bates of Quinton, flying a Bell 407 helicopter, died at the scene, according to state police.

The cause of the crash, which was in a wooded area near a residence on Old Farm Road, is being investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board, but there is no indication of foul play, state police said Saturday night.

“Our state police and law enforcement family at large are mourning this tragic outcome to an already challenging day,” said Col. W. Steven Flaherty, Virginia State Police superintendent. “Lieutenant Cullen was a highly respected professional aviator and trooper-pilot Bates was a welcome addition to the Aviation Unit, after a distinguished assignment as a special agent with our Bureau of Criminal Investigation. Their deaths are a tremendous loss to our agency and the commonwealth.”

Gov. Terry McAuliffe and first lady Dorothy McAuliffe released a statement Saturday night saying, “These heroes were part of our family, and we are simply heartbroken.”

“We are deeply saddened by the loss of Jay and Berke, both of whom were our close friends and trusted members of our team,” the statement said. “Jay has flown us across the commonwealth for more than three and a half years. Berke was devoted to our entire family as part of our Executive Protective Unit team for the past three years.”

The two victims were the only people on board the helicopter and there were no injuries to anyone on the ground, state police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said.

Police were notified of the crash at 4:54 p.m.

“Albemarle County police and fire responded first,” said Geller, standing a few hundred yards from the crash site. “They located the wreckage of a helicopter in the woods near a residence off Old Farm Road, at the very end of the roadway. It was fully engulfed. And at this time we do have two confirmed fatalities. State law in Virginia says that the Virginia State Police has to investigate all aircraft crashes so that’s why we responded to the scene.”

Geller said the aircraft was not the state police helicopter seen circling above Saturday’s white nationalist rally in downtown Charlottesville, a gathering at which a car was driven into a group of counterprotesters, killing one and injuring 19.

President Donald Trump expressed his sympathies to the state police on Twitter:

“Deepest condolences to the families & fellow officers of the VA State Police who died today. You’re all among the best this nation produces.”

mbarber@timesdispatch.com

http://www.richmond.com/news/virginia/state-police-helicopter-crashes-near-birdwood-golf-course-witnesses-say/article_429c00cc-dd49-5dfd-94ab-8d43e7eeb71a.html

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2 hurt after World War II-era plane crashes in Ashland County

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 10:24

Two people were injured after the plane they were flying in crash-landed at Ashland County Airport.

According to the Ashland County Sheriff’s Office, the plane was a 1943 North American SNJ 4 used by the U.S. Navy during World War II. It was flying in from Wadsworth the airport’s Veterans Appreciation Day festivities.

Shortly after landing, the plane wobbled on the runway before gliding along the median for a few hundred feet. The nose of the aircraft then hit the ground, causing it to flip over. The accident occurred just after 11:15 a.m. Saturday.

The pilot and a passenger (a family member according to an event official) were taken to University Hospitals Samaritan Medical Center with “non-life-threatening injuries,” according to the sheriff’s office.

http://www.wkyc.com/news/local/northeast-ohio/2-hurt-after-world-war-ii-era-plane-crashes-in-ashland-county/463891840

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Historic Jenny plane crashes at golf course

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 10:23

By DON SERGENT 

What started as a relaxing morning on the golf course turned into a day Brian Duvall won’t soon forget.

“It was the scariest thing I’ve ever seen,” said Duvall, who was playing in the Monie Beard Golf Classic at CrossWinds Golf Course on Saturday when a rare and historic Curtiss JN-4 single-engine biplane known as Jenny crash-landed about 11:15 a.m. on the No. 4 fairway. “I’ve never seen anything like it.” 

The plane, flown by veteran pilot Terry Richardson, took off from runway No. 3 at Bowling Green-Warren County Regional Airport, climbed to 100 feet or so, then began descending toward the golf course that abuts the airport. It clipped a tree on the edge of the fairway before crashing about 400 feet from airport property.

“We saw him coming in low and could see he was distressed,” said Duvall, who was on hole No. 5.

Duvall and his playing partners hurried to the crash scene to find a plane with crumpled wings and extensive damage to its fabric. Duvall approached Richardson in the pilot’s seat and found the man bleeding from a head wound.

“He (Richardson) told me to get him out,” Duvall recalled. “By the time we got there, blood was gushing out. He said the plane might blow. Gas was pouring out. I took him about 30 feet away. Another guy (Drew Beard) came over and gave me a shirt to put over the wound so I could apply pressure to the wound.”

Richardson was able to walk to the ambulance when it arrived to take him to The Medical Center. Med Center Health Executive Director for Marketing and Public Relations Barbara Taylor later said the pilot was listed in fair condition, meaning his vital signs are stable and indications are favorable he will recover.

Chuck Coppinger, a fellow pilot and a member of the Friends of Jenny nonprofit organization that restored the plane, said Richardson was slated to go home Saturday night.

The plane was transported to a hangar at the airport Saturday afternoon, and airport Manager Rob Barnett said the Federal Aviation Administration would begin its investigation Monday.

Coppinger said few pilots were as qualified as Richardson to fly the plane. A Franklin resident, Richardson is a retired U.S. Navy pilot. Earlier this year, he was awarded the Wright Brothers’ Master Pilot Award in recognition of his 50 years of aeronautical experience as an aviator – the highest FAA award for career achievement in aviation.

As for the cause of the accident, Coppingter said: “It’s all speculation at this point. I don’t know if it was engine failure or flight controls.”

Another eyewitness and one of Duvall’s playing partners in the golf scramble, Jim Holland, said: “It sounded like the engine didn’t have power. He was kinda leaning to the side. He came right over the top of us and clipped that tree. The plane spun around and then went down.”

The crash damaged a plane that had become a flying history lesson of sorts and an ambassador for Bowling Green. The Curtiss JN-4 was the first mass-produced World War I flight trainer and carried the first regularly scheduled air mail for the United States Postal Service. In fact, the Jenny restored by the Friends of Jenny organization in Bowling Green bears the same number (38262) as the first JN-4 to carry air mail in 1918.

Richardson and others have flown the plane to shows in Wisconsin, Florida, Alabama and other areas.

Another Friends of Jenny member who has flown the plane, Larry Bailey, described the JN-4 as “a challenging airplane” to fly under the best of conditions. He said Saturday’s surface winds could have caused problems.

“I noticed the surface winds were a little strong,” Bailey said. “I don’t know if that had anything to do with it. The power plant could have had an issue.”

Whatever the cause, Barnett believes the damage to the historic plane is tragic.

“There is substantial damage,” he said. “It’s a shame. It’s very unfortunate.”

http://www.bgdailynews.com/news/historic-jenny-plane-crashes-at-golf-course/article_6bb36254-c34d-5c46-9623-f770eee2ec6b.html

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Plane crash survivor crawls half mile to get help after accident

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 10:20

MADISON TOWNSHIP, MI (WTOL) –

Two people were seriously injured when a single-engine aircraft crashed on Friday morning in Madison Township in Lenawee County.

Johanna Walker, 52, a flight instructor, was giving flying lessons to Jason Roan, 49, when the plane’s engine lost power and failed. They tried landing the plane in a nearby field but crashed into trees.  

Both were sent to a Toledo hospital are in serious condition.

The crash happened at about 10 a.m. on Lyons Road between the Sand Creek Highway and Gorman Road, south of the Lenawee County Airport.

However, first responders did not get a call about the crash until 2:20 p.m.

A man who lives about a mile away from where the plane crashed didn’t see much until he grabbed his camera and began snapping pictures.

“I took a picture of the fire vehicles back there and when I zoomed into it I found the plane was in the trees in my photo and I didn’t even know that when I took it,” said Ron Williams.

The crash happened about a half mile away from the road near a field.

Perhaps the most amazing part of the story is that, despite being seriously injured, one of the victim’s was able to crawl her way out of the field to the road where she found someone who was able to call for help.

“It’s a long way back if you’ve been through something like that. It’s pretty remarkable that somebody could make it all the way back out here,” said Lenawee County Undersheriff Troy Bevier.

The crash happened less than a mile from the Lenawee County Airport where the airport manager says this plane is kept.

The FAA is investigating exactly what happened and why.

Walker and her husband Dan own Skywalker Flight Training based at Lenawee County Airport. They opened the business this year.

http://www.wtol.com/story/36117608/plane-crashes-near-adrian-airport

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