ARFF (Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting)

Today is Tuesday the 15th of October, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/15/2019 - 01:05

Here are your stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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Plane evacuated at Midway Airport for mechanical issue; no one injured

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/15/2019 - 01:03

Sun-Times Media Wire

CHICAGO – No one was injured Monday when an airplane experienced a mechanical issue shortly after landing at Midway International Airport and was evacuated.

The fire department was called about 8:20 a.m. for a plane with “a mechanical issue in the front of the plane,” according to Chicago Fire Dept. Deputy District Chief Walter Schroeder.

Everyone disembarked, and no injuries were reported, Schroeder said.

Video broadcast from the scene showed a Southwest Airlines plane on the airfield surrounded by emergency vehicles. Photos posted to social media showed a plane with a flat tire.

In a statement, Southwest Airlines said that all 137 customers and five crew members were evacuated from the plane when the “aircraft experienced a hydraulic issue following landing.”

“There are no injuries reported and we place nothing higher than safety as we remove this aircraft from service pending a maintenance review,” the airline said in its statement.

The flight, #4448 from Austin, had turned off the runway after landing and stopped short of approaching the terminal building, according to the statement. Everyone aboard was evacuated onto buses and taken to the terminal.

The Chicago Dept. of Aviation confirmed they had a “standby alert” for the Southwest Airlines flight from Austin, but declined to comment further.

https://www.fox32chicago.com/news/plane-evacuated-at-midway-airport-for-mechanical-issue-no-one-injured

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Small plane crashes at local airport; no injuries reported

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/15/2019 - 01:01

A small plane crashed in a field just east of the Stephens County Airport runway on Monday afternoon, Oct. 14, setting a grassfire that was extinguished by the Breckenridge Fire Department. According to county and city officials, there were no injuries reported in the incident, which happened at about 12:45 p.m.

Based on unofficial reports from the scene, the pilot reported that the single-engine prop plane suffered engine problems as he attempted to land at the airport. One wing clipped trees along a fence line as the plane crash landed. The plane caught on fire, and the doors of the plane were blocked.

The pilot and the only passenger aboard reportedly used the emergency exit to get out of the plane uninjured. Both the pilot and passenger are from San Angelo.

In addition to the BFD, also responding to the scene were the Breckenridge Police Department, the Stephens County Sheriff’s Office, Sacred Cross EMS and the Texas Department of Public Safety. The Federal Aviation Administration is en route to the scene.

The crash is currently under investigation by the DPS.

https://breckenridgetexan.com/2019/10/14/small-plane-crashes-at-local-airport-no-injuries-reported/

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NTSB Releases Preliminary Report From Piper Aerostar Accident

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/15/2019 - 01:00

Airplane Was Apparently Misfueled With Jet A

The NTSB has released a preliminary report from an accident which occurred on October 5, 2019 about 1637 eastern daylight time involving a Piper Aerostar 602P, N326CW. The aircraft departed from Kokomo Municipal Airport (KOKK), Kokomo, Indiana, and impacted a field about 3.6 miles south of the airport. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The airline transport pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to Indiana Paging Network Inc and was operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight while departing from KOKK. 

On the day of the accident, the flight departed from Peter O Knight Airport (KTPF), Tampa, Florida, about 0645 and arrived at OKK about 1027. The purpose of the flight was for the pilot, who was employed by In Flight Review, Inc, based in Tampa, Florida, to provide Piper PA-42 Cheyenne recurrent training to a customer based at KOKK.

According to the airport employee who fueled the airplane, he asked the pilot of N326CW, while on approach to the airport, if he wanted jet fuel, and the pilot said “yes.” He said the he asked the pilot if he wanted jet fuel because the airplane looked like a jet airplane. When the airplane arrived, the employee pulled the Jet A fuel truck out and parked it in front of the airplane while the pilot was still inside the airplane. The employee said that he asked the pilot again if he was wanted jet fuel, and the pilot said “yes.” The employee fueled the airplane with about 163 gallons of Jet A from the fuel truck. The employee said that he was able to orientate the different shaped nozzle (relative to the 100 low lead fuel truck nozzle) from the Jet A fuel truck by positioning it 90 degrees over the wing fuel tank filler necks and about 45 degrees over the fuselage filler necks. He said the he initially spilled about one gallon of fuel during refueling and adjusted his technique so subsequent fuel spillage was minimal.

The Jet A fuel truck had “JET A” on its left, right, and rear sides.

The employee that was inside the fixed base operator building about 1620 heard the engines start. After the engines started, the engines sounded “typical.” He said that he did not hear any radio transmissions from the pilot during his departure and did not hear an engine runup.

The pilot, who received recurrent training from the accident pilot, stated the accident pilot began training right away beginning about 1045. They completed training and it was after 1630 when the pilot drove the accident pilot to N326CW. The pilot said the accident pilot visually checked the fuel tanks of the airplane and gave a “thumbs-up” to the pilot. The pilot did not stay for the remainder of the accident pilot’s preflight and drove off. The pilot heard the engines start and “they sounded normal.” The pilot did not see the takeoff. The pilot said the winds favored runway 14, which was in use on the day of the accident.

A witness stated that she saw a “low flying” airplane flying from north to south. The airplane made a “sharp left turn” to the east. The left wing “dipped low” and she then lost sight of the airplane but when she approached the intersection near the accident site, she saw the airplane on the ground.

Post-accident examination of the airplane revealed the airplane wreckage path was about 328 ft in length along an approximate heading of 046° on a dry and hard surfaced fallow bean field. Components of the left side of the airplane were near the southwestern portion of the wreckage path. The wreckage and the wreckage path displayed features consistent with an accelerated stall.

The examination revealed the presence of a clear liquid consistent in color and order with that of Jet A in a fuselage tank and in the fuel lines leading to the fuel manifolds of both engines. Several of the engine spark plugs exhibited damage consistent with detonation. Flight control continuity was confirmed. The landing gear was in the retracted position.

NATA released a statement following the release of the preliminary report. “The National Air Transportation Association (NATA) was saddened to learn of a recent preliminary report of a fatal aircraft accident related to a suspected misfueling. Aircraft misfuelings are preventable through proper training and eliminating these incidents is a top priority for NATA and our membership. NATA’s Misfueling Prevention Program can be accessed free of charge at www.preventmisfueling.com and includes learning tracks for line service professionals, customer service representatives, FBO managers, and pilots,” stated NATA president Gary Dempsey. “NATA urges ALL FBOs, regardless if you are a member of NATA, and pilots to use this complimentary resource NATA created for the industry. NATA is dedicated to working with our members, partners, and other industry stakeholders to educate the aviation community and keep our skies safe and secure.”

(Source: NTSB and NATA. Image from YouTube video posted by user Graham P. Not accident airplane)

FMI: www.nata.aero
NTSB report

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 10/15/2019 - 00:57

32 Years ago today: On 15 October 1987 an ATI ATR-42 lost control in icing conditions and crashed, killing all 37 occupants (1st fatal ATR-42 accident).

Date: Thursday 15 October 1987 Time: 19:28 Type: ATR 42-312 Operator: Aero Trasporti Italiani – ATI Registration: I-ATRH C/n / msn: 046 First flight: 1987 Engines:Pratt & Whitney Canada PW120 Crew: Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 3 Passengers: Fatalities: 34 / Occupants: 34 Total: Fatalities: 37 / Occupants: 37 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Conca di Crezzo (   Italy) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Milano-Linate Airport (LIN/LIML), Italy Destination airport: Köln/Bonn Airport (CGN/EDDK), Germany Flightnumber: 460

Narrative:
The aircraft took off from Milan-Linate (LIN) for a flight to Köln (CGN). Icing conditions existed. Fifteen minutes after takeoff, while climbing through FL147 in IAS hold mode (constant speed set at 133 kts) the aircraft rolled left and right. The plane rolled 41 degrees right, 100 degrees left, 105 degrees right and 135 degrees left. During pull up three anomalous pitch trim movements set the elevator to pitch down, preventing recovery. The ATR crashed nose down into a 700 m high mountain following an uncontrolled descent.

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Today is Monday the 14th of October, 2019 – Columbus Day

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/14/2019 - 01:52

Hello from Bruges, Belgium where we are for a couple of days.

Here are the stories to start the new week…

Have a safe week!

Tom

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Plane Makes Emergency Landing In Miami; No One Hurt

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/14/2019 - 01:49

A small plane was forced to make an emergency landing at Miami Executive Airport Friday but no one was hurt.

By Paul Scicchitano, Patch Staff

MIAMI, FL — A small plane was forced to make an emergency landing at Miami Executive Airport Friday but no one was hurt, according to Miami-Dade Fire Rescue.

“When MDFR’s foam truck arrived, they found that the small aircraft had already landed on the runway,” said an agency spokesperson. “Crews assessed the scene and ensured there were no injuries on board.”

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman told Patch the Piper PA-34 aircraft landed on Runway 9L at Miami Executive Airport. It experienced gear issues around 10 a.m.

“Two people were aboard. The aircraft was repaired and taxied back to the ramp without incident,” the FAA spokesman said. “The FAA will investigate.”

Miami Dade’s foam trucks are equipped to fight aircraft fires and other types of hazards.

https://patch.com/florida/miami/plane-makes-emergency-landing-miami-no-one-hurt

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Snowbirds pilot safe after ejecting from plane in Georgia crash

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/14/2019 - 01:47

Organizers cancel rest of the Atlanta Air Show after plane went down

The Associated Press

The Royal Canadian Air Force says one of its pilots is safe after he had to eject from his plane just before an aerobatics show in the United States.

The Canadian Forces Snowbirds said Capt. Kevin Domon-Grenier’s jet crashed into an unpopulated area Sunday near Hampton, Ga. No one on the ground was injured.

The Snowbirds were set to perform at the Atlanta Air Show. Event organizers said they cancelled the rest of Sunday’s show after the crash.

The Snowbirds said in a statement on Twitter that it is too early to speculate on what caused the crash.

Social media video from the air show held at the Atlanta Motor Speedway south of the city showed smoke rising from the downed jet well off in the distance.

Domon-Grenier is from St-Raymond de Portneuf, Que., and was previously deployed to Afghanistan. In 2017, when he was in training, he was in a plane in which a small fire broke out during the Atlantic Canada International Air Show at CFB Greenwood in Nova Scotia.

The Snowbirds have been performing since 1971.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/snowbirds-pilot-safe-after-ejecting-from-plane-in-georgia-crash-1.5320017?cmp=rss

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Authorities investigating plane crash in Island Park

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/14/2019 - 01:46

By Rett Nelson, EastIdahoNews.com

HENRYS LAKE – A plane crash in Island Park is currently under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Fremont County Sheriff Len Humphries tells EastIdahoNews.com a single-engine plane crashed on a landing strip off state highway 87 near Henrys’ Lake Saturday afternoon.

The call came in around 2:15.

The plane flipped over after it landed. Humphries did not know the type of airplane or what caused the crash, but the pilot walked away without any injuries. His name has not been released. He is from Sugar City.

A witness who saw the crash wrote on Facebook,

“There was a lot of effort put forth by those who were first on the scene, from emergency response to deputies, ambulance and state patrol, for someone that was trying to land a perfectly good plane.”

The FAA has been notified. An investigation is underway with more details forthcoming.

https://www.eastidahonews.com/2019/10/authorities-investigating-plane-crash-in-island-park/

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Pilot alive after Atkinson County crop duster crash

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/14/2019 - 01:44

by FOX 31 Staff

A pilot in Atkinson County is alive but suffered a head injury and has a few cuts and scrapes after a plane crash Friday morning.

The Atkinson County Sheriff’s Office and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating after the accident on Talmadge McKinnon Road in Willacoochee.

The FAA confirms that an Ayres Thrush S2R aircraft crashed in a field near Willacoochee at 9:21 a.m.

Atkinson County Sheriff David Moore says that the plane was dusting a cotton field and circled around when it clipped the power lines and crashed into a wooded area next to the field.

Lineman anticipate that the power will be restored by Friday evening.

The pilot’s name has not been released as of publication.

https://wfxl.com/news/local/pilot-alive-after-crop-duster-crash

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Pilot overturns aircraft shortly after takeoff in North Idaho plane crash

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/14/2019 - 01:43

By: Emily Oliver

COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho – The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office identified the man injured in an aircraft crash at the Coeur d’Alene Airport on Friday.

According to a release, deputies believe 51-year-old Thomas Stotts overturned his aircraft during the beginning stages of takeoff, sending him barreling into a nearby field.

First responders found Stotts pinned underneath the aircraft. It took fire crews about five minutes to extricate him.

“This is a rare event,” said Chris Larson with Northern Lights Fire. “Coeur d’Alene Airport has a great history of safety out here. As being in the fire district for 20 years, this is a very rare event.”

Stotts was taken to the hospital with serious but non-life threatening injuries, the sheriff’s office said.

The cause of the crash is currently under investigation and the Federal Aviation Administration has been notified.

https://www.kxly.com/news/4-news-now-headed-to-small-aircraft-crash-at-coeur-d-alene-airport/1131417422

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Mon, 10/14/2019 - 01:40

15 Years ago today: On 14 October 2004 an MK Airlines Boeing 747-244B (SF) crashed on takeoff from Halifax, killing all 7 occupants.

Date: Thursday 14 October 2004 Time: 03:56 Type: Boeing 747-244BSF Operator: MK Airlines Registration: 9G-MKJ C/n / msn: 22170/486 First flight: 1980-10-24 (24 years) Total airframe hrs: 80619 Cycles: 16368 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT9D-7Q Crew: Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 0 Total: Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: Halifax International Airport, NS (YHZ) (   Canada) Phase: Takeoff (TOF) Nature: Cargo Departure airport: Halifax International Airport, NS (YHZ/CYHZ), Canada Destination airport: Zaragoza Airport (ZAZ/LEZG), Spain Flightnumber: 1602

Narrative: 
At 00:03 local time MK Airlines flight 1602 departed Windsor Locks-Bradley International Airport (BDL) for a flight to Zaragoza, Spain with a cargo of lawn tractors. An intermediate stop was made at Halifax (YHZ), where the aircraft landed at 02:12 local time. At YHZ the aircraft was loaded with 53,000 kilograms of lobster and fish. After fueling, the total fuel load was 89 400 kg. The planned takeoff weight was 353 000 kg. The Boeing Laptop Tool (BLT) was then used to calculate the takeoff speeds. Since the software was last used before the takeoff from Bradley, it still contained those figures. The airport information and weather was changed to Halifax, but somehow the takeoff weight was not changed and remained showing 240.000 kg. Takeoff performance data were generated, resulting in incorrect V speeds and thrust setting being transcribed to the takeoff data card. It is most likely that the crew did not adhere to the operator’s procedures for an independent check of the takeoff data card, so the erroneous figures went unnoticed.
It was dark, but the weather was fine as the airplane was cleared to taxi to runway 24 (8800 ft / 2682 m long) for departure. After push back, the aircraft began to taxi, the flaps were extended to 20°, and the horizontal stabilizer was set to 6.1 trim units, where it remained for the duration of the flight. The flight control checks were completed during the taxi. The aircraft entered runway 24 at Taxiway Delta and backtracked to the threshold. The aircraft then made a 180° turn to the right and, upon lining up with the runway, the thrust levers were advanced and a rolling takeoff was commenced at 06:53:22.
At the start of the takeoff roll, the thrust levers were smoothly advanced from ground idle thrust (approximately 1.0 EPR) to takeoff power with all final EPR settings indicating between 1.3 and 1.33. The aircraft accelerated through 80 KCAS (06:53:46) approximately 1800 feet (550 m) from the threshold.
At 130 KCAS, the control column was moved aft to 8.4° to initiate rotation as the aircraft passed the 5500-foot (1680 m) mark of runway 24 (3300 feet / 1010 m of runway remaining). The aircraft began to rotate. The pitch attitude stabilized briefly at approximately 9° nose-up, with airspeed at 144 KCAS. Because the 747 still had not lifted off the runway, the control column was moved further aft to 10°, and the aircraft responded with a further pitch up to approximately 11°; initial contact of the lower aft fuselage with the runway occurred at this time. The aircraft was approximately at the 8000-foot (2450 m) mark and slightly left of the centreline. The control column was then relaxed slightly, to 9° aft.
The pitch attitude stabilized in the 11° range for the next four seconds, and the lower aft fuselage contact with the runway ended briefly. With approximately 600 feet (185 m) of runway remaining, the thrust levers were advanced to 92 per cent and the EPRs increased to 1.60. With 420 feet (130 m) remaining, the lower aft fuselage contacted the runway a second time. As the aircraft passed the end of the runway, the control column was 13.5° aft, pitch attitude was 11.9° nose-up, and airspeed was 152 KCAS. The highest recorded nose-up pitch of 14.5° (06:54:24) was recorded after the aircraft passed the end of the runway at a speed of 155 KCAS. The aircraft became airborne approximately 670 feet (205 m) beyond the paved surface and flew a distance of 325 feet (100 m). The lower aft fuselage then struck an earthen berm supporting an instrument landing system (ILS) localizer antenna. The aircraft’s tail separated on impact, and the rest of the aircraft continued in the air for another 1200 feet (370 m) before it struck terrain and burst into flames

Probable Cause:

FINDINGS AS TO CAUSES AND CONTRIBUTING FACTORS:
1. The Bradley take-off weight was likely used to generate the Halifax take-off performance data, which resulted in incorrect V speeds and thrust setting being transcribed to the take-off data card.
2. The incorrect V speeds and thrust setting were too low to enable the aircraft to take off safely for the actual weight of the aircraft.
3. It is likely that the flight crew member who used the Boeing Laptop Tool (BLT) to generate take-off performance data did not recognize that the data were incorrect for the planned take-off weight in Halifax. It is most likely that the crew did not adhere to the operator’s procedures for an independent check of the take-off data card.
4. The pilots of MKA1602 did not carry out the gross error check in accordance with the company’s standard operating procedures (SOPs), and the incorrect take-off performance data were not detected.
5. Crew fatigue likely increased the probability of error during calculation of the take-off performance data, and degraded the flight crew’s ability to detect this error.
6. Crew fatigue, combined with the dark take-off environment, likely contributed to a loss of situational awareness during the take-off roll. Consequently, the crew did not recognize the inadequate take-off performance until the aircraft was beyond the point where the take-off could be safely conducted or safely abandoned.
7. The aircraft’s lower aft fuselage struck a berm supporting a localizer antenna, resulting in the tail separating from the aircraft, rendering the aircraft uncontrollable.
8. The company did not have a formal training and testing program on the BLT, and it is likely that the user of the BLT in this occurrence was not fully conversant with the software.

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Today is Friday the 11th of October, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/11/2019 - 09:37

Here are the stories to close out this week…

Columbus Day holiday on Monday, everyone have a safe weekend!

Tom

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Silverstone airplane skids off runway at Wilson Airport runway

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/11/2019 - 09:26

By  Sara Okuoro

A Silverstone plane crashed on the runway at Wilson Airport in Nairobi on Friday morning. 

The Lamu bound airplane – flight 5Y-IZO – crashed shortly after take-off.

The plane had 5 crew members and 50 passengers on board, two of which were injured during the crash.

The casualties were rushed to Nairobi Hospital for medical attention.

All the others passengers were safely evacuated from the airplane.

There were no fatalities reported.

The cause of the crash is yet to be established.

Silverstone Air released a statement following the Friday morning accident stating, “We can confrim that our Fokker 50, 5Y-IZO, had an incident while taking off at 9:00AM … The passengers and crew have been safely disembarked and we are currently working with the relevant authorities to assess the situation.”

“The Aircraft Accident Investigations Directorate, under the Ministry of Transport, Infrastructure, Housing and Urban Development, is carrying out investigations to establish the cause of the accident,” read part of a statement by the Kenya Airports Authority.

https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/business/article/2001345174/silverstone-airplane-crashes-at-wilson-airport-runway

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Small plane makes emergency landing on street, rear-ends car, but no injuries reported

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/11/2019 - 09:24

By: Journal-News

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Ohio — A small plane crash-landed at a busy residential intersection and rear-ended a car Thursday afternoon but no one appeared to be seriously injured, the Journal-News reported.

The single-engine Piper PA-28 lost engine power as it was approaching Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport and crash-landed 2 miles away at West Spring Valley Pike and Yankee Street in Washington Township, south of Dayton, according to Maj. Matt Haines of the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office.

The pilot and a passenger were up and walking but were taken to a local hospital to be checked out, Haines said. The driver of the car, a BMW, was shaken up but was not injured. He was checked by medics but declined to go to the hospital, Haines said.

The driver told WHIO Dayton he was “a little wound up” after the experience.

“Not everyday you get hit by a plane,” he said.

“I got almost in the intersection or slightly in the intersection and out of the corner of my eye I saw a plane coming at me,” the driver said. “I didn’t have much of a chance to react or get out of the way and the next think I knew the thing hit me, hit the rear of the car and spun me around.”

The plane came within inches of hitting a second car, Haines said.

The Federal Aviation Administration website shows that the plane was registered Wednesday. The certificate was issued to GC Aviation Services-1 LLC, 10600 Springboro Pike in Miamisburg.

https://www.wcpo.com/news/local-news/small-plane-makes-emergency-landing-on-street-rear-ends-car-but-no-injuries-reported

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Fire in the sky forces emergency landing in Texas

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/11/2019 - 09:22

By: Courtney Mabeus

A fire that broke out in the engine of their trainer jet forced a Navy flight instructor and student to make an emergency landing Monday in Texas, officials said.

Lt. Michelle Tucker, the spokeswoman for Chief of Naval Air Training, told Navy Times that the T-45C Goshawk tandem-seat jet landed safely with no injuries to the Training Squadron 21 passengers or damage to Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Orange Grove property.

“Safety is the number one priority,” Tucker said. “Our pilots are trained to respond to in-air emergencies and these pilots used their training to make a safe landing.”

Tucker said officials are probing the cause of the incident, which is classified as a Class A mishap because damages will cost at least $2 million to fix.

The Navy pegs the cost of a new training jet at $17.2 million.

NALF Orange Grove helps support flights from Naval Air Station Kingsville-based Training Air Wing 2, which is headquartered about 45 miles southeast of the two Jim Wells County runways.

The wing annually trains about half of all new Navy and Marine Corps fighter pilots.

https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2019/10/10/fire-in-the-sky-forces-emergency-landing-in-texas/

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U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao Announces Appointees to Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/11/2019 - 09:20

WASHINGTON – U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Secretary Elaine L. Chao today announced the appointment of 23 members to DOT’s Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC).

“The committee is a useful forum for the Department to receive feedback from aviation community stakeholders,” said Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

The U.S. Department of Transportation established the ARAC as a discretionary Federal Advisory Committee in 1991 to provide advice and recommendations on a full range of aviation-related issues in the development of regulations. This includes aircraft operations, airman and air agency certification, airworthiness standards and certification, airports, maintenance, noise, and training. To date, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has implemented over 70 percent of ARAC’s recommendations.

The committee meets quarterly at FAA headquarters in Washington, DC. The ARAC currently consists of 23 members who represent organizations from across the aviation community directly and indirectly impacted by FAA regulations. These include aircraft owners and operators, airmen and flight crewmembers, organizations representing airports, maintenance providers, manufacturers, public citizen and passenger groups, training providers, and FAA employee labor representatives.

The following individuals are being appointed as new members to the ARAC:

  • Daniel Friedenzohn, Associate Dean for College of Aviation, Embry-Riddle University (ERAU)
  • Leslie Riegle, Assistant Vice President for Civil Aviation, Aerospace Industries Association (AIA)
  • Paul Alp, Esq., Jenner and Block, LLP, National Association of Flight Instructors (NAFI)
  • Larry Rooney, President, Coalition of Airline Pilots Associations (CAPA)

The following individuals are being re-appointed as members to the ARAC:

  • Chairperson: Yvette Rose, Senior Vice President, Cargo Airline Association (CAA)
  • Vice Chairperson: David Oord, Senior Director, Government Affairs, Regulatory, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA)
  • Paul McGraw, Vice President, Operations and Safety, Airlines for America (A4A)
  • Melissa Sabatine, Senior Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, American Association of Airport Executives
  • Michelle Betcher, International Flight Superintendent (Delta Air Lines), Airline Dispatchers Federation (ADF)
  • Ric Peri, Vice President of Government Affairs and Industry Affairs, Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA)
  • Chris Witkowski, Director of the Air Safety, Health and Security Department, Association of flight Attendants (AFA)
  • Randy Kenagy, Manager, Engineering and Operations, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA)
  • Sarah MacLeod, Executive Director, Aeronautical Repair Station Association (ARSA)
  • Stephane Flori, Expert for Safety Regulations, Airbus S.A.S., Aerospace and Defence Industries Association of Europe (ASD)
  • Tom Charpentier, Government Relations Specialist, Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA)
  • Paul Hudson, President, FlyersRights.org
  • Walter Desrosier, Vice President, Engineering and Maintenance, General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA)
  • Chris Martino, Vice President, Operations, Helicopter Association International (HAI)
  • George Paul, Vice President, Technical Services, National Air Carrier Association (NACA)
  • Doug Carr, Vice President of Regulatory and International Affairs, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)
  • Gail Dunham, Executive Director, National Air Disaster Alliance/Foundation (NADA/F)
  • Ambrose Clay, Councilman for City of College Park, GA, National Organization to Insure a Sound-Control Environment (N.O.I.S.E)
  • Keith Morgan, Technical Fellow, Certification and Airworthiness, Pratt and Whitney

https://www.faa.gov/news/press_releases/news_story.cfm?newsId=24295

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 10/11/2019 - 09:19

35 Years ago today: On 11 October 1984 an Aeroflot Tupolev 154 collided with a snowplough on landing at Omsk, killing 178 people.

Date: Thursday 11 October 1984 Time: 05:39 Type: Tupolev Tu-154B-1 Operator: Aeroflot, East Siberia Civil Aviation Directorate Registration: CCCP-85243 C/n / msn: 77A-243 First flight: 1977 Engines:Kuznetsov NK-8-2U Crew: Fatalities: 5 / Occupants: 9 Passengers: Fatalities: 169 / Occupants: 170 Total: Fatalities: 174 / Occupants: 179 Ground casualties: Fatalities: 4 Aircraft damage: Destroyed Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Omsk Airport (OMS) (   Russia) Crash site elevation: 95 m (312 feet) amsl Phase: Landing (LDG) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Krasnodar Airport (KRR/URKK), Russia Destination airport: Omsk Airport (OMS/UNOO), Russia Flightnumber: SU3352

Narrative:
Aeroflot Flight 3352 was a regular domestic service from Krasnodar to Omsk and Novosibirsk, Soviet Union (now Russia).
The aircraft, a Tupolev Tu-154B-1, took off from Krasnodar at 23:37 hours Moscow time.
At 05:15 local time (02:15 Moscow time), three vehicles were dispatched to the runway at Omsk Airport to carry out work. The vehicles were not equipped with radios that would allow listening to the tower frequency, nor with rotating flashing beacons.
Meanwhile, flight 3352 was descending towards Omsk. Visibility was 3000 m, with rain, and haze. Temperature was +3°C and ceiling was measured at 110 m.
At 05:33, the landing controller turned on the runway lights. The aircraft touched down at 05:39 hours. Immediately after touching down at a speed of about 140 knots the crew noticed vehicles on the runway. An evasive manoeuvre was of no avail as the aircraft struck three vehicles and a fire erupted. Four occupants of the vehicles and 174 occupants of the aircraft died in the crash.

One of the controllers had fallen asleep and thus failed to inform the approach controller about the presence of the vehicles on the runway.

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Pilot, 74, survives fiery plane crash near Fayette County Airport

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 10/10/2019 - 05:32

BY DAVID ROYER AND LUKE JONES

FAYETTE COUNTY, Tenn. — A 74-year-old pilot survived a close brush with death after his plane crashed and burst into flames in a field shortly after taking off from the Fayette County Airport Wednesday afternoon. 

The Fayette County Sheriff’s Office said the pilot, Floyd Yarbro of Kenton, Tennessee, escaped the wreckage without any serious injuries and was taken to a Memphis hospital to be checked out.

They said he had just left the airport around 3:30 p.m. when he experienced some type of engine trouble and tried to circle back.

“It looked like he was having trouble getting up. It looked like he was coming down and then going up,” said witness Johny Vanlandingham.

About a football field’s distance from the airport, the pilot attempted a rough landing in a field, but the sheriff’s office said his front landing gear snapped off as he did so.

“I saw his back wheels hit and when it did, it threw his nose forward,” said Vanlandingham.

The pilot had just enough time to get out of the plane before it burst into flames, Vanlandingham said. Within minutes, he said the plane was fully engulfed.

“He was fine, he was just scared as anybody would be, Vanlanginham said of the pilot.

“To hear that he got out alive that’s a blessing with all the smoke that was coming and the flames. That’s wonderful, I’m glad to hear that,” said Iris Jackson, who lives nearby.

The plane is a single-engine Beech B19, according to federal aviation records. It was manufactured in 1974, but it’s still unclear why the engine failed.

“We don’t know what the cause will be at this point. The FAA and the NTSB have been called. It will be tomorrow before they’ll be able to come out and begin their investigation,” said Ray Garcia with the Fayette County Sheriff’s Office.

The plane is registered to an Arkansas clinic, but it’s unclear what connection the pilot has to that.

https://wreg.com/2019/10/09/small-plane-crashes-at-fayette-county-airport/

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