EMS

Guatemala Volcano Death Toll Up to 33, Expected to Rise

JEMS - News - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:42

EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — Rescuers on Monday pulled at least 10 people alive from ash drifts and mud flows that poured down the slopes of Guatemala's erupting Volcano of Fire, but officials said at least 33 people were dead and the toll was expected to rise.

The head of the country's disaster agency, Sergio Cabanas, gave the updated death toll, but said rescuers using helicopters had pulled 10 people from areas swept over by a towering cloud of thick ash, mud or lava.

Residents of El Rodeo, about 8 miles (12 kilometers) downslope from the crater, said they were caught unaware by fast-moving pyroclastic flows when the volcano west of Guatemala City exploded Sunday, sending towering clouds of ash miles into the air.

Searing flows of ash mixed with water and debris down its flanks, blocking roads and burning homes.

The charred landscape left behind was still too hot to touch or even to pull bodies from in many parts, melting the shoes of rescuers. Workers told of finding bodies so thickly coated with ash they appeared to be statues. Inhaling ash or hot volcanic gases can asphyxiate people quickly.

Hilda Lopez said the volcanic mud swept into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain's flanks. She still doesn't know where her mother or her sister are.

"We were at a party, celebrating the birth of a baby, when one of the neighbors shouted at us to come out and see the lava that was coming," Lopez recalled. "We didn't believe it, and when we went out the hot mud was already coming down the street."

"My mother was stuck there, she couldn't get out," said Lopez, weeping and holding her face in her hands.

Disaster agency spokesman David de Leon said 18 bodies had been found in San Miguel Los Lotes. Lopez's husband, Joel Gonzalez, said his father was had been unable to escape and was believed to be "buried back there, at the house."

In the village of El Rodeo, heavily armed soldiers wearing blue masks to ward off the dust stood guard behind yellow tape cordoning off the scene as orange-helmeted workers operated a backhoe. A group of residents arrived at the scene with shovels and work boots.

Categories: EMS

Chris Powell Appointed as Corporate Controller for Pelican Products, Inc.

JEMS - News - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 11:58

TORRANCE, CA – Pelican Products, Inc., the global leader in the design and manufacture of high performance protective cases, temperature controlled packaging and advanced portable lighting systems, has appointed Chris Powell as Corporate Controller to manage global financial operations.

 “Sound fiscal policy and practices are the cornerstone of any successful business and Chris’ diverse experience will ensure that Pelican continues to offer the high level of service and quality that our customers have come to expect,” said Don Jordan, Chief Financial Officer, Pelican Products. 

 As Corporate Controller, Powell will have direct oversight of the company’s global Accounting department which provides financial services for Pelican’s Commercial/Government, Consumer, BioThermal and International divisions. His responsibilities will include financial statements, general ledger, cost accounting, payroll, accounts payable, accounts receivable, budgeting, tax compliance, and various special analyses. 

 Mr. Powell brings extensive financial leadership experience to Pelican. He began his career with PricewaterhouseCoopers in Los Angeles and subsequently served in key financial leadership roles at Qualstar, Guidance Software, ReachLocal, Beats by Dre and Velocify, Inc. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics / Accounting and is a Certified Public Accountant in the state of California.

Categories: EMS

Chris Powell Appointed as Corporate Controller for Pelican Products, Inc.

JEMS - News - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 11:58

TORRANCE, CA – Pelican Products, Inc., the global leader in the design and manufacture of high performance protective cases, temperature controlled packaging and advanced portable lighting systems, has appointed Chris Powell as Corporate Controller to manage global financial operations.

 “Sound fiscal policy and practices are the cornerstone of any successful business and Chris’ diverse experience will ensure that Pelican continues to offer the high level of service and quality that our customers have come to expect,” said Don Jordan, Chief Financial Officer, Pelican Products. 

 As Corporate Controller, Powell will have direct oversight of the company’s global Accounting department which provides financial services for Pelican’s Commercial/Government, Consumer, BioThermal and International divisions. His responsibilities will include financial statements, general ledger, cost accounting, payroll, accounts payable, accounts receivable, budgeting, tax compliance, and various special analyses. 

 Mr. Powell brings extensive financial leadership experience to Pelican. He began his career with PricewaterhouseCoopers in Los Angeles and subsequently served in key financial leadership roles at Qualstar, Guidance Software, ReachLocal, Beats by Dre and Velocify, Inc. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics / Accounting and is a Certified Public Accountant in the state of California.

Categories: EMS

Medusa Medical Technologies Partners with Beyond Lucid Technologies to Provide Prehospital Data Exchange

JEMS - News - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 22:38

HALIFAX, NS and CONCORD, CA (May 29, 2018) — Medusa Medical Technologies today announced that it has partnered with California-based Beyond Lucid Technologies (BLT) to create a “plug-and-play” solution for exchanging EMS-based electronic patient care record (ePCR) data with electronic health records in hospitals, clinics and other care facilities. The collaboration fuses Medusa’s solution, Siren ePCR, with BLT’s MEDIVIEW™ Beacon Health Information Exchange, and will allow EMS and Fire agencies to achieve new levels of data sharing with their local hospital networks. It’s technology and data coming together — and it’s a tested and proven solution.

Brent Townsend, Medusa’s VP Business Development says, “The integration went extremely well without any tweaks from the Medusa side. It speaks to the engineering quality of the MEDIVIEW™ Beacon product and its ability to meet the conventions of the NEMSIS and CCD (continuity of care document) specifications. We simply provided the NEMSIS 3.4 compliant file, and BLT did the rest. Any ePCR platform should be able to plug into BLT’s solution quickly and efficiently.”

BLT’s MEDIVIEW™ Beacon solution is forging an era of open collaboration with industry partners. It allows those services who aren’t wanting to replace their current ePCR system to “plug in” to an HIE with minimal cost and effort. Adds Townsend, “EMS want more than just an ePCR solution. They want connectivity between disparate health systems and applications with real-time data sharing. This is a common problem we hear from our customers throughout North America, Europe and Australia. Bringing together the Siren and MEDIVIEW™ solutions helps to bridge the data gap between EMS and hospitals.”

Jonathon Feit, BLT’s Co-Founder & CEO, said, “We’re honored that Medusa Medical, a global leader in electronic patient care documentation technology, chose to partner with BLT and become the first in the industry to send data through our ‘prehospital pipes.’ At a time when trust and security are top-of-mind for everyone involved in data sharing, we believe transparent operations just make sense. We have pioneered the use of federalized interoperability standards (under the ONCHIT Meaningful Use framework) to achieve an elegant, plug-and-play solution.”

Categories: EMS

Medusa Medical Technologies Partners with Beyond Lucid Technologies to Provide Prehospital Data Exchange

JEMS - News - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 22:38

HALIFAX, NS and CONCORD, CA (May 29, 2018) — Medusa Medical Technologies today announced that it has partnered with California-based Beyond Lucid Technologies (BLT) to create a “plug-and-play” solution for exchanging EMS-based electronic patient care record (ePCR) data with electronic health records in hospitals, clinics and other care facilities. The collaboration fuses Medusa’s solution, Siren ePCR, with BLT’s MEDIVIEW™ Beacon Health Information Exchange, and will allow EMS and Fire agencies to achieve new levels of data sharing with their local hospital networks. It’s technology and data coming together — and it’s a tested and proven solution.

Brent Townsend, Medusa’s VP Business Development says, “The integration went extremely well without any tweaks from the Medusa side. It speaks to the engineering quality of the MEDIVIEW™ Beacon product and its ability to meet the conventions of the NEMSIS and CCD (continuity of care document) specifications. We simply provided the NEMSIS 3.4 compliant file, and BLT did the rest. Any ePCR platform should be able to plug into BLT’s solution quickly and efficiently.”

BLT’s MEDIVIEW™ Beacon solution is forging an era of open collaboration with industry partners. It allows those services who aren’t wanting to replace their current ePCR system to “plug in” to an HIE with minimal cost and effort. Adds Townsend, “EMS want more than just an ePCR solution. They want connectivity between disparate health systems and applications with real-time data sharing. This is a common problem we hear from our customers throughout North America, Europe and Australia. Bringing together the Siren and MEDIVIEW™ solutions helps to bridge the data gap between EMS and hospitals.”

Jonathon Feit, BLT’s Co-Founder & CEO, said, “We’re honored that Medusa Medical, a global leader in electronic patient care documentation technology, chose to partner with BLT and become the first in the industry to send data through our ‘prehospital pipes.’ At a time when trust and security are top-of-mind for everyone involved in data sharing, we believe transparent operations just make sense. We have pioneered the use of federalized interoperability standards (under the ONCHIT Meaningful Use framework) to achieve an elegant, plug-and-play solution.”

Categories: EMS

Guardian Flight Alaska and Alaska Regional Team Up To Save More Lives

JEMS - News - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 17:35

Anchorage, Alaska- In the past four years, Guardian Flight Alaska and Alaska Regional LifeFlight swiftly transported nearly 10,000 critically ill patients to local hospitals.

The largest air medical transport company and longest-tenured air medevac company in Alaska respectively achieved this significant number of patient transports while providing service across a state with the greatest geographical footprint in the nation.

Backed by Alaska Regional Hospital, Guardian and LifeFlight partnered in 2014 to bring expert medical direction 24/7 from Dr. Jennifer Dow and Dr. David Cadogan, both specializing in emergency medicine. Since then, this partnership has served to better connect rural Alaskans with medical specialists and patient care that are unavailable in their local communities. As a result, many more lives were saved and long-term disabilities were reduced.  

"With six bases and highly qualified medical teams, Guardian Flight has the largest EMS aircraft fleet in the state," said Guardian Flight Alaska Executive Director Jared Sherman. "In addition, Guardian Flight Alaska is replacing its fleet of smaller Learjets and Beechjets with five Learjet 45s."

Guardian Flight medical teams perform advanced medical training quarterly, using patient simulators that represent adults and children. This investment enables the clinical teams to provide unequaled, quality medical evacuation services to Alaska's critically ill patients.

At Alaska Regional Hospital, a new comprehensive protocol enables more timely patient transports provided by these state-of-the-art air ambulances. Teams at its Patient Transfer Center utilize the protocol to significantly reduce the time it takes to accept a patient into the hospital's admission process. In fact, that is often completed in less than 10 minutes - with only one call to the transfer center.

When notified that a patient needs to be urgently admitted and transported, the transfer center team alerts physicians and hospital staff, who quickly confirm that specialists are available to treat the patient upon arrival. Then that team works with Guardian Flight to dispatch an air ambulance sooner or place one on standby. This unique protocol enables faster aircraft dispatches and earlier treatments at the hospital. 

Categories: EMS

Guardian Flight Alaska and Alaska Regional Team Up To Save More Lives

JEMS - News - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 17:35

Anchorage, Alaska- In the past four years, Guardian Flight Alaska and Alaska Regional LifeFlight swiftly transported nearly 10,000 critically ill patients to local hospitals.

The largest air medical transport company and longest-tenured air medevac company in Alaska respectively achieved this significant number of patient transports while providing service across a state with the greatest geographical footprint in the nation.

Backed by Alaska Regional Hospital, Guardian and LifeFlight partnered in 2014 to bring expert medical direction 24/7 from Dr. Jennifer Dow and Dr. David Cadogan, both specializing in emergency medicine. Since then, this partnership has served to better connect rural Alaskans with medical specialists and patient care that are unavailable in their local communities. As a result, many more lives were saved and long-term disabilities were reduced.  

"With six bases and highly qualified medical teams, Guardian Flight has the largest EMS aircraft fleet in the state," said Guardian Flight Alaska Executive Director Jared Sherman. "In addition, Guardian Flight Alaska is replacing its fleet of smaller Learjets and Beechjets with five Learjet 45s."

Guardian Flight medical teams perform advanced medical training quarterly, using patient simulators that represent adults and children. This investment enables the clinical teams to provide unequaled, quality medical evacuation services to Alaska's critically ill patients.

At Alaska Regional Hospital, a new comprehensive protocol enables more timely patient transports provided by these state-of-the-art air ambulances. Teams at its Patient Transfer Center utilize the protocol to significantly reduce the time it takes to accept a patient into the hospital's admission process. In fact, that is often completed in less than 10 minutes - with only one call to the transfer center.

When notified that a patient needs to be urgently admitted and transported, the transfer center team alerts physicians and hospital staff, who quickly confirm that specialists are available to treat the patient upon arrival. Then that team works with Guardian Flight to dispatch an air ambulance sooner or place one on standby. This unique protocol enables faster aircraft dispatches and earlier treatments at the hospital. 

Categories: EMS

Treating the Ebola Outbreak in Western Africa

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 14:46

Ogweno and his team brought as many as 25 patients a day to the ETU. Photos courtesy Elvis Ogweno

Working in EMS on an Ebola mission means you’re the first contact with the patient and the family. What you tell them matters a lot.

When visiting a contaminated home, our team, which consists of a driver, two hygienists, one paramedic, and one psycho-social nurse, has to perform both donning (i.e., putting on) and doffing (i.e., taking off) our personal protective equipment (PPE) in the field.

Before entering the house, we run through a PPE checklist: Scrubs, gum boots, gloves, Tychem suit, mask, hood, apron, goggles, and gloves (again).

“Ready?” I ask the hygienist assisting me.

She shakes her head and grabs a small strip of duct tape, covering the space between my hood and goggles where a thin slice of skin was showing.

“Now you’re ready,” she replies.

The temperature in most parts of Liberia is just over 80 degrees F. The humidity is even higher. I feel the sweat collecting between my skin and the suit, pooling in my boots and along the bottom of my goggles as I slowly follow the one of the hygienists, who’s also dressed in full PPE, into the patient’s house (i.e., the high-risk zone).

It feels far more like we’re scuba diving in a hot spring than a conducting a normal inter-facility ambulance transfer in the city, but that’s exactly what we’re doing.

Categories: EMS

Pace yourself

EMScapades Cartoon - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 09:19
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Pace yourself

EMScapades Cartoon - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 09:19
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Preparing for Vehicle Attacks: Lessons Learned from Berlin, Germany

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 02:18
Lessons learned from the truck attack in Berlin, Germany By Johannes Kohlen, EMT-P & Klaus Runggaldier, PhD, EMT-P

Injured persons are treated by first responders and bystanders who provided initial first aid after a terrorist drove a truck into a crowd of people at a Christmas market in Berlin. Photo courtesy Berliner Feuerwehr

It was a cold, dry winter’s evening at a popular Christmas market at Breitscheidplatz in Berlin, Germany on the night of December 19, 2016. With the temperature hovering just above freezing, residents and visitors peacefully drank warm, mulled wine as they huddled around market stalls next to the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church. Nobody noticed the semi-trailer truck, stolen earlier that night, as its driver made his way from the direction of Zoologischer Garten railway station and deliberately drove into the crowd of holiday shoppers in the square outside the church.

The incident, likely a terrorist attack, injured 67 people, many critically, and 12 people were killed. In the year since this attack took place, deliberate attacks where vehicles are used as lethal weapons have increased in frequency and become a disturbing trend.

Last year, vehicles were used as weapons in attacks in cities both large and small, in the U.S. and abroad, including New York City, Barcelona, Charlottesville (Va.), Stockholm, Jerusalem and London—where there were two attacks. Sadly, Germany can now lay claim to experiencing two of these attacks, after the driver of a delivery truck slammed into a crowd of people in the city of Muenster on April 7.

Categories: EMS

American Cancer Society Advises Colon Screenings Should Begin at 45, Not 50

JEMS - News - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 09:34

NEW YORK (AP) — New guidelines released Wednesday recommend U.S. adults start colon cancer screening earlier, at age 45 instead of 50.

The American Cancer Society's advice puts it out of sync with guidelines from an influential government advisory group, which kept the age at 50 in an update two years ago.

Cancer society officials acknowledge the shift to 45 could cause confusion for doctors and patients but felt strongly that they needed to act now. The advocacy group was influenced by its study, published last year, that found rising rates of colon cancer and deaths in people younger than 50. Experts aren't sure why there has been a 50 percent increase in cases since 1994.

The guidelines are for men and women ages 45 to 75 of average risk for colon cancer; recommendations are different for people with certain conditions, like Crohn's disease, or a family history of colon cancer. The group endorses six kinds of screening exams, from inexpensive take-home stool tests performed every year to colonoscopies done every 10.

"All of these tests are good tests, and the choice should be offered to patients," said the cancer society's Dr. Rich Wender. "The best test is the test that gets done."

The same tests are recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a panel that reviews evidence and issues advice for a variety of screenings and treatments. It updated its colon cancer guidelines in 2016 and its next review isn't expected until around 2021.

That panel's recommendations drive what screening is covered by insurance under the Affordable Care Act, although 20 states have laws that link coverage to the cancer society guidelines. It's not uncommon for groups to have slightly different guidelines although those for colon cancer have been about the same for decades.

Most colon cancer occurs in adults 55 and older, and the good news is rates of cases and deaths have been falling for decades. Colon cancer, combined with rectal cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. This year, more than 140,000 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with it, and about 50,000 will die from it.

Categories: EMS

American Cancer Society Advises Colon Screenings Should Begin at 45, Not 50

JEMS - News - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 09:34

NEW YORK (AP) — New guidelines released Wednesday recommend U.S. adults start colon cancer screening earlier, at age 45 instead of 50.

The American Cancer Society's advice puts it out of sync with guidelines from an influential government advisory group, which kept the age at 50 in an update two years ago.

Cancer society officials acknowledge the shift to 45 could cause confusion for doctors and patients but felt strongly that they needed to act now. The advocacy group was influenced by its study, published last year, that found rising rates of colon cancer and deaths in people younger than 50. Experts aren't sure why there has been a 50 percent increase in cases since 1994.

The guidelines are for men and women ages 45 to 75 of average risk for colon cancer; recommendations are different for people with certain conditions, like Crohn's disease, or a family history of colon cancer. The group endorses six kinds of screening exams, from inexpensive take-home stool tests performed every year to colonoscopies done every 10.

"All of these tests are good tests, and the choice should be offered to patients," said the cancer society's Dr. Rich Wender. "The best test is the test that gets done."

The same tests are recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a panel that reviews evidence and issues advice for a variety of screenings and treatments. It updated its colon cancer guidelines in 2016 and its next review isn't expected until around 2021.

That panel's recommendations drive what screening is covered by insurance under the Affordable Care Act, although 20 states have laws that link coverage to the cancer society guidelines. It's not uncommon for groups to have slightly different guidelines although those for colon cancer have been about the same for decades.

Most colon cancer occurs in adults 55 and older, and the good news is rates of cases and deaths have been falling for decades. Colon cancer, combined with rectal cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. This year, more than 140,000 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with it, and about 50,000 will die from it.

Categories: EMS

Inside EMS Podcast: Is there an optimal age to start your EMS career?

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 08:02
Inside EMS Podcast: Is there an optimal age to start your EMS career? by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Design to Honor Sept. 11 Rescuers and Recovery Workers Unveiled

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:14

NEW YORK (AP) — A pathway flanked by six stones meant to symbolize strength and determination will be added to the Sept. 11 memorial site in lower Manhattan to honor the rescue and recovery workers who toiled for months at ground zero, officials announced Wednesday in unveiling the design concept.

The new dedicated area will also serve as a way to honor those who became sick or died from exposure to the toxins in the environment after the twin towers fell.

"Hundreds of thousands of people are estimated to have been exposed to toxins at the World Trade Center site, both on the day of 9/11 and during the months of recovery operations that followed," Alice Greenwald, president and CEO of the National Sept. 11 Memorial & Museum, said in a statement.

She added, "By integrating this meaningful public space at the memorial, we seek to recognize all those for whom 9/11 has remained an all-too-present reality."

The announcement was on the day of the memorial and museum's annual commemoration of the rescue and recovery effort, which officially ended on May 30, 2002.

The idea for the space had been announced last year, with officials joined by former "The Daily Show" host Jon Stewart, a board member of the museum who has been an outspoken advocate for the Zadroga Act, which provides health benefits to first responders who fell ill after the attacks.

He said in his statement: "These men and women sacrificed themselves for the rest of us and have spent years suffering and dying because of it. We have long owed it to them to honor their contributions. It's also important for us to recognize the folks who have died or are suffering who were exposed to World Trade Center toxins while working in lower Manhattan or called the community their home."

The new space was designed by Michael Arad and Peter Walker, the men who came up with the concept for the reflecting pools and surrounding trees that make up the Sept. 11 memorial and plaza.

Categories: EMS

Design to Honor Sept. 11 Rescuers and Recovery Workers Unveiled

JEMS - News - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:14

NEW YORK (AP) — A pathway flanked by six stones meant to symbolize strength and determination will be added to the Sept. 11 memorial site in lower Manhattan to honor the rescue and recovery workers who toiled for months at ground zero, officials announced Wednesday in unveiling the design concept.

The new dedicated area will also serve as a way to honor those who became sick or died from exposure to the toxins in the environment after the twin towers fell.

"Hundreds of thousands of people are estimated to have been exposed to toxins at the World Trade Center site, both on the day of 9/11 and during the months of recovery operations that followed," Alice Greenwald, president and CEO of the National Sept. 11 Memorial & Museum, said in a statement.

She added, "By integrating this meaningful public space at the memorial, we seek to recognize all those for whom 9/11 has remained an all-too-present reality."

The announcement was on the day of the memorial and museum's annual commemoration of the rescue and recovery effort, which officially ended on May 30, 2002.

The idea for the space had been announced last year, with officials joined by former "The Daily Show" host Jon Stewart, a board member of the museum who has been an outspoken advocate for the Zadroga Act, which provides health benefits to first responders who fell ill after the attacks.

He said in his statement: "These men and women sacrificed themselves for the rest of us and have spent years suffering and dying because of it. We have long owed it to them to honor their contributions. It's also important for us to recognize the folks who have died or are suffering who were exposed to World Trade Center toxins while working in lower Manhattan or called the community their home."

The new space was designed by Michael Arad and Peter Walker, the men who came up with the concept for the reflecting pools and surrounding trees that make up the Sept. 11 memorial and plaza.

Categories: EMS

Design to Honor Sept. 11 Rescuers and Recovery Workers Unveiled

JEMS - News - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:14

NEW YORK (AP) — A pathway flanked by six stones meant to symbolize strength and determination will be added to the Sept. 11 memorial site in lower Manhattan to honor the rescue and recovery workers who toiled for months at ground zero, officials announced Wednesday in unveiling the design concept.

The new dedicated area will also serve as a way to honor those who became sick or died from exposure to the toxins in the environment after the twin towers fell.

"Hundreds of thousands of people are estimated to have been exposed to toxins at the World Trade Center site, both on the day of 9/11 and during the months of recovery operations that followed," Alice Greenwald, president and CEO of the National Sept. 11 Memorial & Museum, said in a statement.

She added, "By integrating this meaningful public space at the memorial, we seek to recognize all those for whom 9/11 has remained an all-too-present reality."

The announcement was on the day of the memorial and museum's annual commemoration of the rescue and recovery effort, which officially ended on May 30, 2002.

The idea for the space had been announced last year, with officials joined by former "The Daily Show" host Jon Stewart, a board member of the museum who has been an outspoken advocate for the Zadroga Act, which provides health benefits to first responders who fell ill after the attacks.

He said in his statement: "These men and women sacrificed themselves for the rest of us and have spent years suffering and dying because of it. We have long owed it to them to honor their contributions. It's also important for us to recognize the folks who have died or are suffering who were exposed to World Trade Center toxins while working in lower Manhattan or called the community their home."

The new space was designed by Michael Arad and Peter Walker, the men who came up with the concept for the reflecting pools and surrounding trees that make up the Sept. 11 memorial and plaza.

Categories: EMS

Design to Honor Sept. 11 Rescuers and Recovery Workers Unveiled

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:14

NEW YORK (AP) — A pathway flanked by six stones meant to symbolize strength and determination will be added to the Sept. 11 memorial site in lower Manhattan to honor the rescue and recovery workers who toiled for months at ground zero, officials announced Wednesday in unveiling the design concept.

The new dedicated area will also serve as a way to honor those who became sick or died from exposure to the toxins in the environment after the twin towers fell.

"Hundreds of thousands of people are estimated to have been exposed to toxins at the World Trade Center site, both on the day of 9/11 and during the months of recovery operations that followed," Alice Greenwald, president and CEO of the National Sept. 11 Memorial & Museum, said in a statement.

She added, "By integrating this meaningful public space at the memorial, we seek to recognize all those for whom 9/11 has remained an all-too-present reality."

The announcement was on the day of the memorial and museum's annual commemoration of the rescue and recovery effort, which officially ended on May 30, 2002.

The idea for the space had been announced last year, with officials joined by former "The Daily Show" host Jon Stewart, a board member of the museum who has been an outspoken advocate for the Zadroga Act, which provides health benefits to first responders who fell ill after the attacks.

He said in his statement: "These men and women sacrificed themselves for the rest of us and have spent years suffering and dying because of it. We have long owed it to them to honor their contributions. It's also important for us to recognize the folks who have died or are suffering who were exposed to World Trade Center toxins while working in lower Manhattan or called the community their home."

The new space was designed by Michael Arad and Peter Walker, the men who came up with the concept for the reflecting pools and surrounding trees that make up the Sept. 11 memorial and plaza.

Categories: EMS

Parent Heart Watch and Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation Join Forces to Urge the Public to Learn CPR and How to Use AEDs to Help Save Lives

JEMS - News - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 17:06

Parent Heart Watch and the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation have joined forces to urge the public to learn CPR and how to use automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to help save lives threatened by sudden cardiac arrest. The co-sponsored Call-Push-Shock campaign is being launched to coincide with National CPR and AED Awareness WeekJune 1-7, a national observance designated by Congress in 2007.

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. It affects more than 356,000 people each year—including 7,000 youth under age 18—and unfortunately only one in every 10 victims survives. The survival rate has remained at about 10 percent for 30 years because the public is not as prepared as it could be to help save lives.

The campaign leverages results of a recent national research study conducted for the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation by global consumer research firm StrataVerve. Findings indicate most Americans are unfamiliar with sudden cardiac arrest and the critical importance of immediate bystander intervention. However, when exposed to a clear description of SCA, both the perceived importance of learning CPR and AED skills, and the likelihood to give CPR or use an AED in an emergency jump significantly.

Categories: EMS

Parent Heart Watch and Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation Join Forces to Urge the Public to Learn CPR and How to Use AEDs to Help Save Lives

JEMS - News - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 17:06

Parent Heart Watch and the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation have joined forces to urge the public to learn CPR and how to use automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to help save lives threatened by sudden cardiac arrest. The co-sponsored Call-Push-Shock campaign is being launched to coincide with National CPR and AED Awareness WeekJune 1-7, a national observance designated by Congress in 2007.

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. It affects more than 356,000 people each year—including 7,000 youth under age 18—and unfortunately only one in every 10 victims survives. The survival rate has remained at about 10 percent for 30 years because the public is not as prepared as it could be to help save lives.

The campaign leverages results of a recent national research study conducted for the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation by global consumer research firm StrataVerve. Findings indicate most Americans are unfamiliar with sudden cardiac arrest and the critical importance of immediate bystander intervention. However, when exposed to a clear description of SCA, both the perceived importance of learning CPR and AED skills, and the likelihood to give CPR or use an AED in an emergency jump significantly.

Categories: EMS

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