EMS

George Rice Joins Redflash Group

JEMS - News - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 11:47

Encinitas, Calif.--The RedFlash Group, a national strategic consulting firm specializing in public safety and healthcare, is pleased to announce the addition of George Rice as a Partner. Rice comes to the RedFlash Group most recently from the Industry Council for Emergency Response Technologies (iCERT), where he oversaw a period of growth and heightened influence for the association throughout a seven-year tenure as Executive Director. He previously served as Executive Director of the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials (APCO).

Rice brings his experiences and insights acquired over a 30-year career in justice, intelligence and public safety in the government, corporate and nonprofit sectors. His role will focus on expanding RedFlash’s strategic consulting services—especially subject matter expertise, communications and marketing guidance to leading organizations.

“George brings such an incredible depth of experience and knowledge to our clients who serve public safety,” said Jake Knight, a founding RedFlash Group partner. “We’ve known and admired George through his leadership at both iCERT and APCO. Our clients will really benefit from George’s dedication, insights and ideas.”

Rice joins Keith Griffiths, Jake Knight and Jeff Berend as the firm’s Partners, starting in his new role on June 18. The iCERT Board of Directors and the RedFlash Group are working together to ensure a smooth transition of the association’s leadership.

“Helping organizations that make a difference in public safety truly drives me,” said Rice, who is based in Washington, D.C. “So much important work is happening in areas like Next Generation 911 and Smart and Safe Communities worldwide. One of the things RedFlash does is help put lifesaving technology and information in the hands of the people who need it. I’m really proud to be a part of that.”

Rice’s experience includes helping lead organizational growth, as well as strategic communications, marketing and media relations. Rice began his public sector career with the FBI and subsequently spent 10 years with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Rice’s post government-service career includes work with advocacy groups, foundations and professional and trade associations. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice Administration from Alvernia University in Reading, Pa. and a certificate in Public Management from the George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Categories: EMS

Las Vegas Shooting: Audio from 518 9-1-1 Calls Released

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 11:22

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Screams and pleas for help, descriptions of people falling amid rapid gunfire, and breathless questions about what to do next emerged Wednesday in 911 audio made public by Las Vegas police eight months after the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

"Shots fired! Shots fired! Hurry!" a woman screams, crying as a dispatcher asks where she is and the call disconnects. The dispatcher calls back and another woman answers.

"Machine guns are being fired into the Route 91 festival," she says. "It's coming from above, I would assume from the Mandalay Bay side over by the Luxor."

In addition to the 518 audio calls, police released video from a camera atop the Mandalay Bay resort that provided a bird's-eye view of the country music festival where 58 people died and hundreds were injured on Oct. 1.

The gunfire came from 32nd-floor windows into a crowd of 22,000 people at the Route 91 Harvest Festival across Las Vegas Boulevard.

Authorities say many more people were traumatized when Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes video-poker player, spent 10 minutes firing rapid-fire barrages with assault-style rifles.

The camera atop the hotel bears silent witness as floodlights sweep the concert crowd before the shooting starts; follows the massacre as bright lights come up and people flee; and shows small groups huddled over apparently injured victims.

After sunrise, covered bodies are seen as coroner's vans arrive at the green concert grounds.

The haunting 911 tapes reflect a range of emotions among callers, including panic, fear and desperation.

"We just ran from the concert. Can you tell us what's going on? We were there. It was bad," one man tells a police dispatcher from the safety of a nearby motel room where he and others took shelter.

The dispatcher asks if he is injured. "No," he replies then sobs. "Just not shot."

Categories: EMS

Las Vegas Shooting: Audio from 518 9-1-1 Calls Released

JEMS - News - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 11:22

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Screams and pleas for help, descriptions of people falling amid rapid gunfire, and breathless questions about what to do next emerged Wednesday in 911 audio made public by Las Vegas police eight months after the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

"Shots fired! Shots fired! Hurry!" a woman screams, crying as a dispatcher asks where she is and the call disconnects. The dispatcher calls back and another woman answers.

"Machine guns are being fired into the Route 91 festival," she says. "It's coming from above, I would assume from the Mandalay Bay side over by the Luxor."

In addition to the 518 audio calls, police released video from a camera atop the Mandalay Bay resort that provided a bird's-eye view of the country music festival where 58 people died and hundreds were injured on Oct. 1.

The gunfire came from 32nd-floor windows into a crowd of 22,000 people at the Route 91 Harvest Festival across Las Vegas Boulevard.

Authorities say many more people were traumatized when Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes video-poker player, spent 10 minutes firing rapid-fire barrages with assault-style rifles.

The camera atop the hotel bears silent witness as floodlights sweep the concert crowd before the shooting starts; follows the massacre as bright lights come up and people flee; and shows small groups huddled over apparently injured victims.

After sunrise, covered bodies are seen as coroner's vans arrive at the green concert grounds.

The haunting 911 tapes reflect a range of emotions among callers, including panic, fear and desperation.

"We just ran from the concert. Can you tell us what's going on? We were there. It was bad," one man tells a police dispatcher from the safety of a nearby motel room where he and others took shelter.

The dispatcher asks if he is injured. "No," he replies then sobs. "Just not shot."

Categories: EMS

Las Vegas Shooting: Audio from 518 9-1-1 Calls Released

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 11:22

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Screams and pleas for help, descriptions of people falling amid rapid gunfire, and breathless questions about what to do next emerged Wednesday in 911 audio made public by Las Vegas police eight months after the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

"Shots fired! Shots fired! Hurry!" a woman screams, crying as a dispatcher asks where she is and the call disconnects. The dispatcher calls back and another woman answers.

"Machine guns are being fired into the Route 91 festival," she says. "It's coming from above, I would assume from the Mandalay Bay side over by the Luxor."

In addition to the 518 audio calls, police released video from a camera atop the Mandalay Bay resort that provided a bird's-eye view of the country music festival where 58 people died and hundreds were injured on Oct. 1.

The gunfire came from 32nd-floor windows into a crowd of 22,000 people at the Route 91 Harvest Festival across Las Vegas Boulevard.

Authorities say many more people were traumatized when Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes video-poker player, spent 10 minutes firing rapid-fire barrages with assault-style rifles.

The camera atop the hotel bears silent witness as floodlights sweep the concert crowd before the shooting starts; follows the massacre as bright lights come up and people flee; and shows small groups huddled over apparently injured victims.

After sunrise, covered bodies are seen as coroner's vans arrive at the green concert grounds.

The haunting 911 tapes reflect a range of emotions among callers, including panic, fear and desperation.

"We just ran from the concert. Can you tell us what's going on? We were there. It was bad," one man tells a police dispatcher from the safety of a nearby motel room where he and others took shelter.

The dispatcher asks if he is injured. "No," he replies then sobs. "Just not shot."

Categories: EMS

Las Vegas Shooting: Audio from 518 9-1-1 Calls Released

JEMS - News - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 11:22

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Screams and pleas for help, descriptions of people falling amid rapid gunfire, and breathless questions about what to do next emerged Wednesday in 911 audio made public by Las Vegas police eight months after the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

"Shots fired! Shots fired! Hurry!" a woman screams, crying as a dispatcher asks where she is and the call disconnects. The dispatcher calls back and another woman answers.

"Machine guns are being fired into the Route 91 festival," she says. "It's coming from above, I would assume from the Mandalay Bay side over by the Luxor."

In addition to the 518 audio calls, police released video from a camera atop the Mandalay Bay resort that provided a bird's-eye view of the country music festival where 58 people died and hundreds were injured on Oct. 1.

The gunfire came from 32nd-floor windows into a crowd of 22,000 people at the Route 91 Harvest Festival across Las Vegas Boulevard.

Authorities say many more people were traumatized when Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes video-poker player, spent 10 minutes firing rapid-fire barrages with assault-style rifles.

The camera atop the hotel bears silent witness as floodlights sweep the concert crowd before the shooting starts; follows the massacre as bright lights come up and people flee; and shows small groups huddled over apparently injured victims.

After sunrise, covered bodies are seen as coroner's vans arrive at the green concert grounds.

The haunting 911 tapes reflect a range of emotions among callers, including panic, fear and desperation.

"We just ran from the concert. Can you tell us what's going on? We were there. It was bad," one man tells a police dispatcher from the safety of a nearby motel room where he and others took shelter.

The dispatcher asks if he is injured. "No," he replies then sobs. "Just not shot."

Categories: EMS

Leading State Law Enforcement Agency First to Adopt RexONE Emergency Extraction Stretchers Statewide

JEMS - News - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 12:09

GLENDORA, CALIF. (PRWEB) REX EMS, LLC announced today that Virginia State Police, the statewide law enforcement agency in Virginia, has contracted to purchase RexONE emergency stretchers for tactical operations in all seven field divisions. The stretchers will be utilized in a variety of emergency and tactical operations conducted by the State Agency.

Following mass casualty and active shooter events such as Las Vegas, Orlando, Boston, Parkland and San Bernardino law enforcement agencies are looking for ways to improve emergency response planning, training and resources. One of the common operational gaps in emergency situations is the ability to rapidly move injured responders (officers) or civilians to safety and medical care.

Virginia State Police is the first statewide law enforcement agency to put into service the RexONE across all divisions. The RexONE is a compact device designed for transport by any agency vehicle and rapidly deployed. The versatility of the RexONE allows for use by specialized teams to not only rapidly transport patients but heavy or bulky equipment as well.

“REX EMS is honored to work with the men and women of Virginia State Police in their preparation for emergency events. We are committed to supporting these public safety professionals with the best designed and built products knowing that their decisive actions can save lives,” said Dan Parke, CEO REX EMS, LLC.

The RexONE is an extremely rugged collapsible stretcher that when deployed can rapidly transport up to 400 pounds and is operated by a single responder. The large interchangeable tires can accommodate sand, ice, snow and off-road environments. The low center of gravity minimizes risk to the patient and allows responders to administer emergency medical treatment during transport.

Products evaluations begin in December of 2017. Following a successful field evaluation, the agency purchased 42 units through REX’s national distributor. Training led by REX EMS, LLC staff was completed onsite in May followed by deployment of the units.

Categories: EMS

Leading State Law Enforcement Agency First to Adopt RexONE Emergency Extraction Stretchers Statewide

JEMS - News - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 12:09

GLENDORA, CALIF. (PRWEB) REX EMS, LLC announced today that Virginia State Police, the statewide law enforcement agency in Virginia, has contracted to purchase RexONE emergency stretchers for tactical operations in all seven field divisions. The stretchers will be utilized in a variety of emergency and tactical operations conducted by the State Agency.

Following mass casualty and active shooter events such as Las Vegas, Orlando, Boston, Parkland and San Bernardino law enforcement agencies are looking for ways to improve emergency response planning, training and resources. One of the common operational gaps in emergency situations is the ability to rapidly move injured responders (officers) or civilians to safety and medical care.

Virginia State Police is the first statewide law enforcement agency to put into service the RexONE across all divisions. The RexONE is a compact device designed for transport by any agency vehicle and rapidly deployed. The versatility of the RexONE allows for use by specialized teams to not only rapidly transport patients but heavy or bulky equipment as well.

“REX EMS is honored to work with the men and women of Virginia State Police in their preparation for emergency events. We are committed to supporting these public safety professionals with the best designed and built products knowing that their decisive actions can save lives,” said Dan Parke, CEO REX EMS, LLC.

The RexONE is an extremely rugged collapsible stretcher that when deployed can rapidly transport up to 400 pounds and is operated by a single responder. The large interchangeable tires can accommodate sand, ice, snow and off-road environments. The low center of gravity minimizes risk to the patient and allows responders to administer emergency medical treatment during transport.

Products evaluations begin in December of 2017. Following a successful field evaluation, the agency purchased 42 units through REX’s national distributor. Training led by REX EMS, LLC staff was completed onsite in May followed by deployment of the units.

Categories: EMS

Pulsara Selected as a JEMS Hot Product from EMS Today 2018

JEMS - News - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 12:06

Bozeman, MT — Pulsara and JEMS (Journal of Emergency Medical Services) are proud to announce the selection of Pulsara’s version 7.0 as a Hot Product from the JEMS EMS Today Conference & Exposition, which was held February 21–23 in Charlotte, NC.

Prior to this release, Pulsara’s communication platform focused on STEMI and Stroke care from EMS to definitive treatment within the hospital.  Version 7.0 allows users to dynamically create a patient channel, build any team based on patient need, and communicate.

“Broadening the Platform to include any time sensitive emergency will allow EMS providers to have one way to do their job. They no longer need to use different communication tools for different conditions. One tool for any emergency,” said James Woodson, Board Certified Emergency Physician and CEO of Pulsara.  

Pulsara was selected after a team of twelve judges consisting of emergency medical services (EMS) product specialists, physicians, educators, managers and paramedics reviewed a host of product contenders. The judges reviewed products designed to not only improve the ability to deliver optimal emergency medical care to sick and injured patients, but also allow EMS agencies to do it safely, more efficiently and with enhanced comfort for the patient.

Products were rated on a 1–5 scale in four distinct categories: 1) Originality; 2) Functionality; 3) Ease of use; and 4) Need in the EMS setting. Pulsara was one of only 30 products selected as Hot Products after the EMS Today Hot Products review team reviewed and rated 64 products submitted by 52 companies.

JEMS Editor-in-Chief and EMS Today Conference Chairman A.J. Heightman said, “There were an amazing group of Hot Product submissions for our reviewers to review and rate this year. All of the products reviewed were extremely innovative and well designed for the EMS industry, showing that our industry is keeping pace with the current science of emergency medicine and developing or upgrading their products to stay out in front of the science and technology curve.”

Categories: EMS

Pulsara Selected as a JEMS Hot Product from EMS Today 2018

JEMS - News - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 12:06

Bozeman, MT — Pulsara and JEMS (Journal of Emergency Medical Services) are proud to announce the selection of Pulsara’s version 7.0 as a Hot Product from the JEMS EMS Today Conference & Exposition, which was held February 21–23 in Charlotte, NC.

Prior to this release, Pulsara’s communication platform focused on STEMI and Stroke care from EMS to definitive treatment within the hospital.  Version 7.0 allows users to dynamically create a patient channel, build any team based on patient need, and communicate.

“Broadening the Platform to include any time sensitive emergency will allow EMS providers to have one way to do their job. They no longer need to use different communication tools for different conditions. One tool for any emergency,” said James Woodson, Board Certified Emergency Physician and CEO of Pulsara.  

Pulsara was selected after a team of twelve judges consisting of emergency medical services (EMS) product specialists, physicians, educators, managers and paramedics reviewed a host of product contenders. The judges reviewed products designed to not only improve the ability to deliver optimal emergency medical care to sick and injured patients, but also allow EMS agencies to do it safely, more efficiently and with enhanced comfort for the patient.

Products were rated on a 1–5 scale in four distinct categories: 1) Originality; 2) Functionality; 3) Ease of use; and 4) Need in the EMS setting. Pulsara was one of only 30 products selected as Hot Products after the EMS Today Hot Products review team reviewed and rated 64 products submitted by 52 companies.

JEMS Editor-in-Chief and EMS Today Conference Chairman A.J. Heightman said, “There were an amazing group of Hot Product submissions for our reviewers to review and rate this year. All of the products reviewed were extremely innovative and well designed for the EMS industry, showing that our industry is keeping pace with the current science of emergency medicine and developing or upgrading their products to stay out in front of the science and technology curve.”

Categories: EMS

FirstNet Chair Sue Swenson Delivers Keynote at the 2018 PSCR Public Safety Broadband Stakeholder Meeting

JEMS - News - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 11:41

Remarks by Sue Swenson, FirstNet Chair

Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) Program Public Safety Broadband Stakeholder Meeting, San Diego, CA, June 5, 2018

 —As prepared for delivery—

Good morning everyone and welcome to America’s Finest City and the 2018 PSCR Conference.

We have spent so many years talking about what seemed to be the elusive nationwide public safety broadband network. It is thrilling this year that FirstNet is finally here and first responders are using its capability with great satisfaction.

I am so pleased to see what is happening in the world for first responders. The reality of a nationwide public safety broadband network has created a marketplace to develop solutions that will help save lives and make the work of public safety more efficient.

And we’re going to hear a lot about those solutions this week. By now you can see that this going to be a week full of great information on several areas of technology that can ultimately take advantage of the FirstNet broadband network. We’re going to hear a lot in key areas of interest:

  1. Public Safety Mission Critical Voice
  2. Location Based Services
  3. LMR to LTE
  4. Public Safety Analytics
  5. User Interface/User Experience
  6. Resilient systems and
  7. Security

And these solutions are focused on what has become the 5th network in the United States. Public safety now truly has its very own network with FirstNet!

Sometimes we can take for granted what has been achieved, so I’d like to highlight what happened just in the last year to get us where we are today.

In March 2017, we signed the contract with AT&T. I’m sure I am not the only person who vividly remembers that day. We were fortunate to have key leaders from the public safety community with us that day - clearly a historic moment in this journey.

Categories: EMS

FirstNet Chair Sue Swenson Delivers Keynote at the 2018 PSCR Public Safety Broadband Stakeholder Meeting

JEMS - News - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 11:41

Remarks by Sue Swenson, FirstNet Chair

Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) Program Public Safety Broadband Stakeholder Meeting, San Diego, CA, June 5, 2018

 —As prepared for delivery—

Good morning everyone and welcome to America’s Finest City and the 2018 PSCR Conference.

We have spent so many years talking about what seemed to be the elusive nationwide public safety broadband network. It is thrilling this year that FirstNet is finally here and first responders are using its capability with great satisfaction.

I am so pleased to see what is happening in the world for first responders. The reality of a nationwide public safety broadband network has created a marketplace to develop solutions that will help save lives and make the work of public safety more efficient.

And we’re going to hear a lot about those solutions this week. By now you can see that this going to be a week full of great information on several areas of technology that can ultimately take advantage of the FirstNet broadband network. We’re going to hear a lot in key areas of interest:

  1. Public Safety Mission Critical Voice
  2. Location Based Services
  3. LMR to LTE
  4. Public Safety Analytics
  5. User Interface/User Experience
  6. Resilient systems and
  7. Security

And these solutions are focused on what has become the 5th network in the United States. Public safety now truly has its very own network with FirstNet!

Sometimes we can take for granted what has been achieved, so I’d like to highlight what happened just in the last year to get us where we are today.

In March 2017, we signed the contract with AT&T. I’m sure I am not the only person who vividly remembers that day. We were fortunate to have key leaders from the public safety community with us that day - clearly a historic moment in this journey.

Categories: EMS

Paid to vs Have to

EMScapades Cartoon - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:48
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Paid to vs Have to

EMScapades Cartoon - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:48
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Only a few of Guatemala Volcano's Dead Have Been Identified

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 09:33

EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — People of the villages skirting Guatemala's Volcano of Fire have begun mourning the few dead who could be identified after an eruption killed dozens by engulfing them in floods of searing ash and mud.

Mourners cried over caskets lined up in a row in the main park of San Juan Alotenango on Monday evening before rescuers stopped their work for another night.

There was no electricity in the hardest hit areas of Los Lotes and El Rodeo, so most searching continued only until sunset. As dawn broke Tuesday, the volcano continued to rattle, with what the country's volcanology institute said were eight to 10 moderate eruptions per hour — vastly less intense than Sunday's big blasts.

Guatemalan authorities put the death toll at 69, but officials said just 17 had been identified so far because the intense heat of the volcanic debris flows left most bodies unrecognizable.

"It is very difficult for us to identify them because some of the dead lost their features or their fingerprints" from the red-hot flows, said Fanuel Garcia, director of the National Institute of Forensic Sciences. "We are going to have to resort to other methods ... and if possible take DNA samples to identify them."

Sunday's eruption caught residents of remote mountain hamlets off guard, with little or no time to flee to safety.

Using shovels and backhoes, emergency workers dug through the debris and mud, perilous labor on smoldering terrain still hot enough to melt shoe soles a day after the volcano exploded in a hail of ash, smoke and molten rock.

Bodies were so thickly coated with ash that they looked like statues. Rescuers used sledgehammers to break through the roofs of houses buried in debris up to their rooflines to check for anyone trapped inside.

Hilda Lopez said her mother and sister were still missing after the slurry of hot gas, ash and rock roared into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain's flanks.

Categories: EMS

Only a few of Guatemala Volcano's Dead Have Been Identified

JEMS - News - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 09:33

EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — People of the villages skirting Guatemala's Volcano of Fire have begun mourning the few dead who could be identified after an eruption killed dozens by engulfing them in floods of searing ash and mud.

Mourners cried over caskets lined up in a row in the main park of San Juan Alotenango on Monday evening before rescuers stopped their work for another night.

There was no electricity in the hardest hit areas of Los Lotes and El Rodeo, so most searching continued only until sunset. As dawn broke Tuesday, the volcano continued to rattle, with what the country's volcanology institute said were eight to 10 moderate eruptions per hour — vastly less intense than Sunday's big blasts.

Guatemalan authorities put the death toll at 69, but officials said just 17 had been identified so far because the intense heat of the volcanic debris flows left most bodies unrecognizable.

"It is very difficult for us to identify them because some of the dead lost their features or their fingerprints" from the red-hot flows, said Fanuel Garcia, director of the National Institute of Forensic Sciences. "We are going to have to resort to other methods ... and if possible take DNA samples to identify them."

Sunday's eruption caught residents of remote mountain hamlets off guard, with little or no time to flee to safety.

Using shovels and backhoes, emergency workers dug through the debris and mud, perilous labor on smoldering terrain still hot enough to melt shoe soles a day after the volcano exploded in a hail of ash, smoke and molten rock.

Bodies were so thickly coated with ash that they looked like statues. Rescuers used sledgehammers to break through the roofs of houses buried in debris up to their rooflines to check for anyone trapped inside.

Hilda Lopez said her mother and sister were still missing after the slurry of hot gas, ash and rock roared into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain's flanks.

Categories: EMS

Only a few of Guatemala Volcano's Dead Have Been Identified

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 09:33

EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — People of the villages skirting Guatemala's Volcano of Fire have begun mourning the few dead who could be identified after an eruption killed dozens by engulfing them in floods of searing ash and mud.

Mourners cried over caskets lined up in a row in the main park of San Juan Alotenango on Monday evening before rescuers stopped their work for another night.

There was no electricity in the hardest hit areas of Los Lotes and El Rodeo, so most searching continued only until sunset. As dawn broke Tuesday, the volcano continued to rattle, with what the country's volcanology institute said were eight to 10 moderate eruptions per hour — vastly less intense than Sunday's big blasts.

Guatemalan authorities put the death toll at 69, but officials said just 17 had been identified so far because the intense heat of the volcanic debris flows left most bodies unrecognizable.

"It is very difficult for us to identify them because some of the dead lost their features or their fingerprints" from the red-hot flows, said Fanuel Garcia, director of the National Institute of Forensic Sciences. "We are going to have to resort to other methods ... and if possible take DNA samples to identify them."

Sunday's eruption caught residents of remote mountain hamlets off guard, with little or no time to flee to safety.

Using shovels and backhoes, emergency workers dug through the debris and mud, perilous labor on smoldering terrain still hot enough to melt shoe soles a day after the volcano exploded in a hail of ash, smoke and molten rock.

Bodies were so thickly coated with ash that they looked like statues. Rescuers used sledgehammers to break through the roofs of houses buried in debris up to their rooflines to check for anyone trapped inside.

Hilda Lopez said her mother and sister were still missing after the slurry of hot gas, ash and rock roared into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain's flanks.

Categories: EMS

Only a few of Guatemala Volcano's Dead Have Been Identified

JEMS - News - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 09:33

EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — People of the villages skirting Guatemala's Volcano of Fire have begun mourning the few dead who could be identified after an eruption killed dozens by engulfing them in floods of searing ash and mud.

Mourners cried over caskets lined up in a row in the main park of San Juan Alotenango on Monday evening before rescuers stopped their work for another night.

There was no electricity in the hardest hit areas of Los Lotes and El Rodeo, so most searching continued only until sunset. As dawn broke Tuesday, the volcano continued to rattle, with what the country's volcanology institute said were eight to 10 moderate eruptions per hour — vastly less intense than Sunday's big blasts.

Guatemalan authorities put the death toll at 69, but officials said just 17 had been identified so far because the intense heat of the volcanic debris flows left most bodies unrecognizable.

"It is very difficult for us to identify them because some of the dead lost their features or their fingerprints" from the red-hot flows, said Fanuel Garcia, director of the National Institute of Forensic Sciences. "We are going to have to resort to other methods ... and if possible take DNA samples to identify them."

Sunday's eruption caught residents of remote mountain hamlets off guard, with little or no time to flee to safety.

Using shovels and backhoes, emergency workers dug through the debris and mud, perilous labor on smoldering terrain still hot enough to melt shoe soles a day after the volcano exploded in a hail of ash, smoke and molten rock.

Bodies were so thickly coated with ash that they looked like statues. Rescuers used sledgehammers to break through the roofs of houses buried in debris up to their rooflines to check for anyone trapped inside.

Hilda Lopez said her mother and sister were still missing after the slurry of hot gas, ash and rock roared into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain's flanks.

Categories: EMS

Guatemala Volcano Death Toll Up to 33, Expected to Rise

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:42

EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — Rescuers on Monday pulled at least 10 people alive from ash drifts and mud flows that poured down the slopes of Guatemala's erupting Volcano of Fire, but officials said at least 33 people were dead and the toll was expected to rise.

The head of the country's disaster agency, Sergio Cabanas, gave the updated death toll, but said rescuers using helicopters had pulled 10 people from areas swept over by a towering cloud of thick ash, mud or lava.

Residents of El Rodeo, about 8 miles (12 kilometers) downslope from the crater, said they were caught unaware by fast-moving pyroclastic flows when the volcano west of Guatemala City exploded Sunday, sending towering clouds of ash miles into the air.

Searing flows of ash mixed with water and debris down its flanks, blocking roads and burning homes.

The charred landscape left behind was still too hot to touch or even to pull bodies from in many parts, melting the shoes of rescuers. Workers told of finding bodies so thickly coated with ash they appeared to be statues. Inhaling ash or hot volcanic gases can asphyxiate people quickly.

Hilda Lopez said the volcanic mud swept into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain's flanks. She still doesn't know where her mother or her sister are.

"We were at a party, celebrating the birth of a baby, when one of the neighbors shouted at us to come out and see the lava that was coming," Lopez recalled. "We didn't believe it, and when we went out the hot mud was already coming down the street."

"My mother was stuck there, she couldn't get out," said Lopez, weeping and holding her face in her hands.

Disaster agency spokesman David de Leon said 18 bodies had been found in San Miguel Los Lotes. Lopez's husband, Joel Gonzalez, said his father was had been unable to escape and was believed to be "buried back there, at the house."

In the village of El Rodeo, heavily armed soldiers wearing blue masks to ward off the dust stood guard behind yellow tape cordoning off the scene as orange-helmeted workers operated a backhoe. A group of residents arrived at the scene with shovels and work boots.

Categories: EMS

Guatemala Volcano Death Toll Up to 33, Expected to Rise

JEMS - News - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:42

EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — Rescuers on Monday pulled at least 10 people alive from ash drifts and mud flows that poured down the slopes of Guatemala's erupting Volcano of Fire, but officials said at least 33 people were dead and the toll was expected to rise.

The head of the country's disaster agency, Sergio Cabanas, gave the updated death toll, but said rescuers using helicopters had pulled 10 people from areas swept over by a towering cloud of thick ash, mud or lava.

Residents of El Rodeo, about 8 miles (12 kilometers) downslope from the crater, said they were caught unaware by fast-moving pyroclastic flows when the volcano west of Guatemala City exploded Sunday, sending towering clouds of ash miles into the air.

Searing flows of ash mixed with water and debris down its flanks, blocking roads and burning homes.

The charred landscape left behind was still too hot to touch or even to pull bodies from in many parts, melting the shoes of rescuers. Workers told of finding bodies so thickly coated with ash they appeared to be statues. Inhaling ash or hot volcanic gases can asphyxiate people quickly.

Hilda Lopez said the volcanic mud swept into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain's flanks. She still doesn't know where her mother or her sister are.

"We were at a party, celebrating the birth of a baby, when one of the neighbors shouted at us to come out and see the lava that was coming," Lopez recalled. "We didn't believe it, and when we went out the hot mud was already coming down the street."

"My mother was stuck there, she couldn't get out," said Lopez, weeping and holding her face in her hands.

Disaster agency spokesman David de Leon said 18 bodies had been found in San Miguel Los Lotes. Lopez's husband, Joel Gonzalez, said his father was had been unable to escape and was believed to be "buried back there, at the house."

In the village of El Rodeo, heavily armed soldiers wearing blue masks to ward off the dust stood guard behind yellow tape cordoning off the scene as orange-helmeted workers operated a backhoe. A group of residents arrived at the scene with shovels and work boots.

Categories: EMS

Guatemala Volcano Death Toll Up to 33, Expected to Rise

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:42

EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — Rescuers on Monday pulled at least 10 people alive from ash drifts and mud flows that poured down the slopes of Guatemala's erupting Volcano of Fire, but officials said at least 33 people were dead and the toll was expected to rise.

The head of the country's disaster agency, Sergio Cabanas, gave the updated death toll, but said rescuers using helicopters had pulled 10 people from areas swept over by a towering cloud of thick ash, mud or lava.

Residents of El Rodeo, about 8 miles (12 kilometers) downslope from the crater, said they were caught unaware by fast-moving pyroclastic flows when the volcano west of Guatemala City exploded Sunday, sending towering clouds of ash miles into the air.

Searing flows of ash mixed with water and debris down its flanks, blocking roads and burning homes.

The charred landscape left behind was still too hot to touch or even to pull bodies from in many parts, melting the shoes of rescuers. Workers told of finding bodies so thickly coated with ash they appeared to be statues. Inhaling ash or hot volcanic gases can asphyxiate people quickly.

Hilda Lopez said the volcanic mud swept into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain's flanks. She still doesn't know where her mother or her sister are.

"We were at a party, celebrating the birth of a baby, when one of the neighbors shouted at us to come out and see the lava that was coming," Lopez recalled. "We didn't believe it, and when we went out the hot mud was already coming down the street."

"My mother was stuck there, she couldn't get out," said Lopez, weeping and holding her face in her hands.

Disaster agency spokesman David de Leon said 18 bodies had been found in San Miguel Los Lotes. Lopez's husband, Joel Gonzalez, said his father was had been unable to escape and was believed to be "buried back there, at the house."

In the village of El Rodeo, heavily armed soldiers wearing blue masks to ward off the dust stood guard behind yellow tape cordoning off the scene as orange-helmeted workers operated a backhoe. A group of residents arrived at the scene with shovels and work boots.

Categories: EMS

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