EMS

Ada County Paramedics Launches New Website

JEMS - News - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 11:33

BOISE, ID, September, 12, 2017 – Ada County Paramedics recently unveiled a newly designed website to provide a more-seamless online experience for patients, Ada County residents and Ada County Paramedics employees alike.

Ada County Paramedics’ Communication Specialist, Hadley Mayes, who managed the redesign, said being forward-thinking in healthcare as well as in the organization’s online presence is important for a public safety agency like Ada County Paramedics.

“We’re always striving for excellence, whether it be our patient care or through our many interactions with the community,” Mayes said, adding that she believes Ada County residents will find the new site easier to navigate, creating a better experience for the many people who visit the agency online.

The site boasts improved functionality, new technology, a more modern appearance and the agency is testing a “Live Chat” feature. Visitors can also find an updated blog, a patient survey and have the ability to securely enroll in the Vital Ride Ambulance Membership program online.

Mayes said the agency’s goal is to make any and all encounters with Ada County Paramedics a positive and professional experience no matter how residents interact with the organization.

“We want to continually improve and make ourselves even more available to the community we live in and serve.”

Visit the new website at www.AdaCountyParamedics.org.

For more information, visit www.AdaCountyParamedics.org or call (208) 287-2962. Like Ada County Paramedics on Facebook, www.Facebook.com/AdaCountyParamedic and follow us on Twitter, www.twitter.com/AdaParamedics.

Categories: EMS

PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center Sets New Precedent for Emergency Care Using Mobile Technology

JEMS - News - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 11:28

BOZEMAN, MT -- Stroke is a leading cause of disability and death in the U.S., with close to 800,000 cases each year. The outcome can be devastating, and every delay in care impacts a stroke survivor’s chance at a full recovery. To minimize those delays and make emergency communication more efficient, PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver, Washington, has partnered with several local EMS services to begin using the healthcare communication platform, Pulsara. PeaceHealth Southwest is the first hospital on the west coast to use Pulsara, and the first in the nation to use the company's Prehospital Alerting Package.

The Prehospital Alerting Package allows EMS services to use Pulsara to provide vital information to the hospital for every patient being transported. American Medical Response, North Country EMS and Camas-Washougal Fire Department are all using Pulsara for more consistent communications with PeaceHealth Southwest’s care teams, with the aim of giving doctors necessary information to begin medical decision making sooner.

In many hospitals and EMS systems, members of the care team communicate time-sensitive details about a patient using radios, pagers, modem phones, and even fax machines. Coordinating care for a critical patient is complex by nature, and these outdated technologies — which can cause miscommunication and lead to important information being missed — complicate it even further.

In addition, communicating via these non-integrated technologies takes a lot of extra time. Before Pulsara was implemented in the community, first responders relied on two-way radios to communicate with PeaceHealth Southwest staff from the field. Communicating patient info on radios is slow and sometimes leads to information being misheard or not heard at all, causing confusion and miscommunication, Brooke Marling, paramedic field training officer with AMR, said in an article in The Columbian.

EMS teams used to rely on a single, unsecure radio channel to contact PeaceHealth Southwest. If multiple medics were trying to call with patient information, they had to wait until the channel was clear, and could not legally provide the patient’s name or any other identifying information.

Categories: EMS

Officials Break Ground on Monument Celebrating 9/11 EMS Responders

JEMS - News - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 11:18

KEANSBURG, NJ -- Approximately 125 people attended the Sept. 10 groundbreaking ceremony here for the EMS Council of New Jersey’s (EMSCNJ) 9/11 memorial, which will feature a piece of steel beam from the World Trade Center. The monument -- the only one in the USA dedicated exclusively to all the emergency medical services personnel who responded that day -- will sit next to the borough’s existing 9/11 memorial on Beachway Avenue. EMSCNJ and Keansburg officials collaborated on the project.

Ceremony participants and guests included: EMSCNJ President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr. of Neptune; Keansburg Borough Mayor George Hoff; Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr. (NJ-06); Assemblyman Declan J. O’Scanlon, Jr. (R-Dist. 13); Monmouth County Freeholder Serena DiMaso, who is also an active riding member of the Holmdel First Aid Squad; and Martin Nystrom of the 9/11 Tribute Center, a former Maplewood Volunteer First Aid Squad member who responded during 9/11.  

The 5-foot-long, 338-pound portion of rusty, twisted steel measures 34 inches wide and 29 inches high. It will be mounted on a massive rock that washed up in Keansburg after Super Storm Sandy, and be displayed between replicas of the Twin Towers. Its placement will be in direct line to where the towers stood across the Raritan Bay.

The 88-year-old nonprofit New Jersey State First Aid Council, doing business as the EMSCNJ, represents 20,000 EMS volunteers affiliated with nearly 300 EMS agencies throughout the state. It was among 1,132 organizations to be awarded an artifact from the Twin Towers rubble. Since taking possession of the steel beam in 2011 from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, EMSCNJ officials have been searching for an appropriate site for a memorial to honor the dozens of EMS responders who died Sept. 11, 2001, as well as the countless New Jersey EMS volunteers and responders from several states who pitched in to help that day and for weeks afterward.

Dedication of the finished memorial is planned for September 2018.

Categories: EMS

LDV, Inc. Reinforces Commitment to Mobile Medical Vehicle Market

JEMS - News - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 11:11

Burlington, Wis. -- LDV, Inc., an industry-leading specialty vehicle manufacturer, deepened its commitment today to the mobile medical vehicle (MMV) market through the creation of a MMV-specific team of employees and a dedicated blog on the company’s website. Leveraging 40 years of technical knowledge, product integration expertise and consultative skills in the specialty vehicle industry, the mobile medical team will primarily focus on delivering durability, reliability and aesthetics for an optimal patient experience. LDV, Inc.’s monthly blog updates will highlight best practices and serve as a source of knowledge for operators and purchasers of mobile medical vehicles. The blog can be found on the company’s website at http://www.ldvusa.com/category/mobile-medical-vehicles.

Built to comfortably provide mammography, dental, medical outreach and blood donation services, LDV, Inc.’s mobile medical vehicles deliver state-of-the-art technology and medical equipment, dependable chassis, body and interior components and ergonomic designs to provide customers complete confidence in the performance of their vehicle. Leveraging superior craftsmanship, LDV, Inc. is dedicated to providing the innovation and quality its customers need along with a wide range of expertise and capabilities through a team of responsive, customer-centric problem solvers.

“Our multi-faceted, MMV-dedicated specialists possess the specialty vehicle knowledge—both mobile medical expertise and vehicle manufacturing proficiencies— to form a team that will effectively provide guidance and assistance from vehicle conception to post-delivery support,” said Mary Lynch, Director of Marketing and Business Development at LDV, Inc. “After identifying post-sales support as a market weakness, we brought together this outstanding team of specialists, dedicated to providing high-quality support and durable vehicles that our customers can utilize for many years to come.”

Based on the foundation built as a specialty vehicle market leader, LDV, Inc. has established itself as a leading mobile medical vehicle manufacturer with a strong foundation in vehicle design and customization. Having developed a well-respected brand in other industries through

Categories: EMS

A Global Anti-Human Trafficking Event

JEMS - News - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 11:07

On October 14, a fundraising and awareness event called #WalkForFreedom will take place in hundreds of cities across 50 nations.

The purpose of the walk, operated by a global anti-human trafficking organization called A21, is to raise awareness about the millions of men, women, and children who are still trapped in slavery today. By fundraising and rallying thousands of people around the cause, the belief is that this event will be the catalyst for the rescue and restoration of human beings who are being exploited as commodities.

Walk For Freedom is distinctly recognized by its participants who are in single-file lines, wearing black shirts and yellow bandanas across their mouths. You’ll see these lines in places all over the world–from in front of the Eiffel Tower in France, to along the Hollywood Walk of Fame in America.

“We are utterly convinced that slavery can be eradicated in our lifetime. Walk For Freedom is definitely one of the most impacting things that we do at A21. It is a tangible, practical, and doable thing for every single person. All of us can put our feet on the pavement and use our steps to make a difference,” says Christine Caine, A21’s Founder.

###

More information about Walk For Freedom and A21 can be found on our website: A21.org and A21.org/Walk

A21 Overview:

We are a nonprofit organization fueled by the radical hope that a world without slavery is possible. We are the abolitionists of the 21st century. Our mission is to end human trafficking. Our operational strategy, and the heart cry of our organization, is to Reach, Rescue, and Restore lives.

Categories: EMS

3 Die in New York City Bus Collision

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 10:28

NEW YORK (AP) — A city bus and a tour bus collided and spun around in a New York City intersection on Monday, leaving three people dead, including a pedestrian, officials said.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said he was shocked by the "sheer destruction," and noted that "one of those who was lost was simply walking down the sidewalk" as the crash came "out of nowhere."

The pedestrian was killed along with the tour bus driver and a passenger on the city bus. Sixteen other people were hurt, some of them seriously, in the crash at 6:15 a.m. in the Flushing, Queens neighborhood, city officials said at a briefing.

A building that houses a number of retail stores, including a fried chicken restaurant, also sustained a "very substantial" impact, and experts were working to make sure it was secure, de Blasio said.

The hospitalized city bus driver was being interviewed by investigators, Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman Joe Lhota said.

Though the investigation has just begun, "These buses spun around. That requires an enormous amount of speed," Lhota said.

"We want to make sure we understand what happened and prevent this from ever happening again," Lhota said.

Signage on the tour bus showed it was from the Dahlia Group, Inc., based in Flushing. A person answering the phone there declined to comment; there was no immediately response to an emailed comment request.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration records show that a Dahlia bus was also involved in a fatal crash in Connecticut in February 2016.

One of the company's buses was driving through a snowstorm to reach the Mohegan Sun casino when it overturned on Interstate 95 in Madison, east of New Haven. Thirty-six people were hurt in addition to the person who died.

Categories: EMS

3 Die in New York City Bus Collision

JEMS - News - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 10:28

NEW YORK (AP) — A city bus and a tour bus collided and spun around in a New York City intersection on Monday, leaving three people dead, including a pedestrian, officials said.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said he was shocked by the "sheer destruction," and noted that "one of those who was lost was simply walking down the sidewalk" as the crash came "out of nowhere."

The pedestrian was killed along with the tour bus driver and a passenger on the city bus. Sixteen other people were hurt, some of them seriously, in the crash at 6:15 a.m. in the Flushing, Queens neighborhood, city officials said at a briefing.

A building that houses a number of retail stores, including a fried chicken restaurant, also sustained a "very substantial" impact, and experts were working to make sure it was secure, de Blasio said.

The hospitalized city bus driver was being interviewed by investigators, Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman Joe Lhota said.

Though the investigation has just begun, "These buses spun around. That requires an enormous amount of speed," Lhota said.

"We want to make sure we understand what happened and prevent this from ever happening again," Lhota said.

Signage on the tour bus showed it was from the Dahlia Group, Inc., based in Flushing. A person answering the phone there declined to comment; there was no immediately response to an emailed comment request.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration records show that a Dahlia bus was also involved in a fatal crash in Connecticut in February 2016.

One of the company's buses was driving through a snowstorm to reach the Mohegan Sun casino when it overturned on Interstate 95 in Madison, east of New Haven. Thirty-six people were hurt in addition to the person who died.

Categories: EMS

London Subway Bombing

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Fri, 09/15/2017 - 09:58

Categories: EMS

Bomb on London Subway Leaves 22 Wounded

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Fri, 09/15/2017 - 09:32

LONDON (AP) — Hundreds of London police embarked on a massive manhunt Friday, racing to find out who placed a homemade bomb on a packed London subway train during the morning rush hour. The explosion wounded 22 people and ignited a panicked stampede to safety.

Witnesses described seeing a "wall of fire" as the bomb — hidden in a plastic bucket inside a supermarket freezer bag — went off about 8:20 a.m. while the train was at the Parsons Green station in southwest London.

It was not a large explosion, and British police and health officials said none of the injured was thought to be seriously hurt. Yet police said it was a terrorist attack, the fifth in Britain this year.

Six hours later, the Metropolitan Police force said there had been no arrests, but hundreds of detectives, aided by intelligence agents, were looking at surveillance camera footage in the subway, carrying out forensic work and speaking to witnesses.

The site of the blast is in a leafy, affluent part of the city, not near any of London's top tourist sites. British media reported that the bomb included a timer. It's not clear whether the device was intended to explode when it did.

Police were alerted when commuters reported a noise and a flash aboard the District Line train. Commuter Lauren Hubbard was on the train when she heard a loud bang.

"I looked around and this wall of fire was just coming towards us. You just run," said Hubbard, who fled the above-ground station with her boyfriend.

Categories: EMS

Bomb on London Subway Leaves 22 Wounded

JEMS - News - Fri, 09/15/2017 - 09:32

LONDON (AP) — Hundreds of London police embarked on a massive manhunt Friday, racing to find out who placed a homemade bomb on a packed London subway train during the morning rush hour. The explosion wounded 22 people and ignited a panicked stampede to safety.

Witnesses described seeing a "wall of fire" as the bomb — hidden in a plastic bucket inside a supermarket freezer bag — went off about 8:20 a.m. while the train was at the Parsons Green station in southwest London.

It was not a large explosion, and British police and health officials said none of the injured was thought to be seriously hurt. Yet police said it was a terrorist attack, the fifth in Britain this year.

Six hours later, the Metropolitan Police force said there had been no arrests, but hundreds of detectives, aided by intelligence agents, were looking at surveillance camera footage in the subway, carrying out forensic work and speaking to witnesses.

The site of the blast is in a leafy, affluent part of the city, not near any of London's top tourist sites. British media reported that the bomb included a timer. It's not clear whether the device was intended to explode when it did.

Police were alerted when commuters reported a noise and a flash aboard the District Line train. Commuter Lauren Hubbard was on the train when she heard a loud bang.

"I looked around and this wall of fire was just coming towards us. You just run," said Hubbard, who fled the above-ground station with her boyfriend.

Categories: EMS

“Oh… and she’s a full code.”

EMScapades Cartoon - Fri, 09/15/2017 - 09:26

New comics every Tuesday and Friday!

Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Inside EMS Podcast: How to take the next step in your EMS career

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Fri, 09/15/2017 - 08:46
Inside EMS Podcast: How to take the next step in your EMS career by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

HCEMS Emergency Medical Professionals Deploy to Florida

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 09/14/2017 - 14:29

HCEMS Paramedic supervisors Lt. Brian Bricker, Lt. Billy Burnette and Lt. David Burdett, deployed for possible 14 day mission.  Lt. Burdett acted as the team leader. Other agencies making up the Region III team were Cheatham County EMS, City Of Bartlett Fire Department EMS, Memorial Hospital EMS,  and Puckett EMS.  The Region III team deployed on Friday, September 8 from Chattanooga as part of Tennessee’s Hurricane Irma response to help local, state, and federal officials in Florida deal with the impact of Hurricane Irma, the second catastrophic hurricane to strike the United States this season.

Tennessee’s Hurricane Irma teams had a total of 151 members to include: a 40-person nurse strike team; five ambulance strike teams with 57 members; three urban search and rescue teams with 40 personnel; two healthy incident management teams with 10 personnel; and a four-member team of emergency management officials.

“We were privileged to have the opportunity to provide emergency equipment and services to local, state and federal officials and helping the people of Florida before, during and following the destruction of Hurricane Irma,” said HCEMS Lt. Brian Bricker. “The coordinated efforts of each government agency, health care institution and team member was quick, organized and effective.”

“We anticipated a longer stay in the Florida area; however, the coordinated preparedness and immediate response to the disaster by many agencies led to less need,” said Lt. David Burdette. “The recovery continues in Florida and our team here in Chattanooga Region III will be available as needed. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Florida community as they begin the process of rebuilding their communities.”

The ambulance strike teams were developed as a voluntary program by the Tennessee Department of Health EMS to assist in local, state and regional disasters.   Hamilton County Emergency Medical Service is part of Tennessee’s Region III Team.  Captain Eric Ethridge of HCEMS acts as the Region III Ambulance Strike Team Coordinator.  Captain Ethridge said “I am glad to have all of the Tennessee Ambulance Strike Teams home today, but especially proud of our team and glad Region III was able to assist the citizens of Florida.”  Captain Ethridge also stated “This was an effort supported by many departments within each agency that provided assets to the deployment.  Many behind the scenes people made this possible.”

Categories: EMS

HCEMS Emergency Medical Professionals Deploy to Florida

JEMS - News - Thu, 09/14/2017 - 14:29

HCEMS Paramedic supervisors Lt. Brian Bricker, Lt. Billy Burnette and Lt. David Burdett, deployed for possible 14 day mission.  Lt. Burdett acted as the team leader. Other agencies making up the Region III team were Cheatham County EMS, City Of Bartlett Fire Department EMS, Memorial Hospital EMS,  and Puckett EMS.  The Region III team deployed on Friday, September 8 from Chattanooga as part of Tennessee’s Hurricane Irma response to help local, state, and federal officials in Florida deal with the impact of Hurricane Irma, the second catastrophic hurricane to strike the United States this season.

Tennessee’s Hurricane Irma teams had a total of 151 members to include: a 40-person nurse strike team; five ambulance strike teams with 57 members; three urban search and rescue teams with 40 personnel; two healthy incident management teams with 10 personnel; and a four-member team of emergency management officials.

“We were privileged to have the opportunity to provide emergency equipment and services to local, state and federal officials and helping the people of Florida before, during and following the destruction of Hurricane Irma,” said HCEMS Lt. Brian Bricker. “The coordinated efforts of each government agency, health care institution and team member was quick, organized and effective.”

“We anticipated a longer stay in the Florida area; however, the coordinated preparedness and immediate response to the disaster by many agencies led to less need,” said Lt. David Burdette. “The recovery continues in Florida and our team here in Chattanooga Region III will be available as needed. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Florida community as they begin the process of rebuilding their communities.”

The ambulance strike teams were developed as a voluntary program by the Tennessee Department of Health EMS to assist in local, state and regional disasters.   Hamilton County Emergency Medical Service is part of Tennessee’s Region III Team.  Captain Eric Ethridge of HCEMS acts as the Region III Ambulance Strike Team Coordinator.  Captain Ethridge said “I am glad to have all of the Tennessee Ambulance Strike Teams home today, but especially proud of our team and glad Region III was able to assist the citizens of Florida.”  Captain Ethridge also stated “This was an effort supported by many departments within each agency that provided assets to the deployment.  Many behind the scenes people made this possible.”

Categories: EMS

Israeli Team Assisting Florida Keys Residents Save Dozens on Tuesday, To Continue Rescue Operations in the Area For the Duration of Mission 

JEMS - News - Thu, 09/14/2017 - 10:15

Jerusalem - On Tuesday, the Israel Rescue Coalition and United Hatzalah first response teams divided up into two groups with one headed to Key West, and the other headed to Naples.

In Naples, the team walked into pandemonium. Houses were completely destroyed and people were without food, water and electricity. The team was warned by local officials that there were groups of looters who had no hesitation to shoot at first responders. Luckily, the group did not encounter any of these groups. They worked with community centers that were taking in displaced people who had stayed in the city during the hurricane but were forced to evacuate their homes due to a lack of power, water and food. They joined clean up efforts and helped feed some 500 people at a local Chabad house after clearing the damage that the house had sustained during the hurricane. In one location, Psychotrauma responders helped calm a man who had been stuck in an elevator for some time while emergency crews worked to extricate him.

In the Florida Keys, the situation was far more dire. Key West and many of the surrounding Keys had been without water or electricity since Saturday, and in spite of an evacuation order for the area, many people had decided to find shelter in the safety of their own homes. The highway leading to the Keys had flooded and there was no way in or out for many people who were trapped there.

“One such person, a military veteran named John, lives by himself in the city of Marathon in the central Keys,” said Tamar Citron, a veteran Search and Rescue volunteer from Israel who is part of the IRC and United Hatzalah team. “John suffers from a respiratory condition that requires him to receive oxygen on a regular basis. Once the hurricane hit, he like all the residents who were still on the Islands were unable to leave. He took shelter from the storm in his bathroom and has spent the last four days without water, electricity or telephone reception. When we got to him he barely had any drinking water or food left.”

Categories: EMS

Israeli Team Assisting Florida Keys Residents Save Dozens on Tuesday, To Continue Rescue Operations in the Area For the Duration of Mission 

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 09/14/2017 - 10:15

Jerusalem - On Tuesday, the Israel Rescue Coalition and United Hatzalah first response teams divided up into two groups with one headed to Key West, and the other headed to Naples.

In Naples, the team walked into pandemonium. Houses were completely destroyed and people were without food, water and electricity. The team was warned by local officials that there were groups of looters who had no hesitation to shoot at first responders. Luckily, the group did not encounter any of these groups. They worked with community centers that were taking in displaced people who had stayed in the city during the hurricane but were forced to evacuate their homes due to a lack of power, water and food. They joined clean up efforts and helped feed some 500 people at a local Chabad house after clearing the damage that the house had sustained during the hurricane. In one location, Psychotrauma responders helped calm a man who had been stuck in an elevator for some time while emergency crews worked to extricate him.

In the Florida Keys, the situation was far more dire. Key West and many of the surrounding Keys had been without water or electricity since Saturday, and in spite of an evacuation order for the area, many people had decided to find shelter in the safety of their own homes. The highway leading to the Keys had flooded and there was no way in or out for many people who were trapped there.

“One such person, a military veteran named John, lives by himself in the city of Marathon in the central Keys,” said Tamar Citron, a veteran Search and Rescue volunteer from Israel who is part of the IRC and United Hatzalah team. “John suffers from a respiratory condition that requires him to receive oxygen on a regular basis. Once the hurricane hit, he like all the residents who were still on the Islands were unable to leave. He took shelter from the storm in his bathroom and has spent the last four days without water, electricity or telephone reception. When we got to him he barely had any drinking water or food left.”

Categories: EMS

After Natural Disasters, Risk of Death and Injury Rises

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 09/14/2017 - 09:56

ATLANTA (AP) — Irma's deadly rampage is over but authorities say the risk of deaths and injuries rises significantly after natural disasters. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says all kinds of hazards can endanger storm survivors, returning evacuees, emergency responders and cleanup crews. "The aftermath of disasters such as Hurricanes Harvey and Irma can be just as dangerous as the storms themselves," notes CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald. And Orlando Fire Department Lt. Aaron Rhodes, notes stress and fatigue can lead to trouble after a disaster: "For one, people get tired, people get frustrated and start cutting corners."

Here's a look at some of the dangers:

Heat and humidity. Eight patients at a sweltering Hollywood, Florida, nursing home died after Irma knocked out the air conditioning. The deaths are being investigated as heat-related. Meanwhile, power outages afflicting millions in Florida could last days or more. Heat-related ailments can include dehydration and breathing difficulties. Experts say heat stroke can send the body's temperature soaring, while heat exhaustion can lead to heavy, sweaty, pale and clammy skin, a fast and weak pulse and even fainting. Heat cramps also can cause muscle spasms.

Lethal fumes such as carbon monoxide from gas-powered generators and clean-up equipment. Millions in Florida are without power and many turn to portable generators. When used improperly, generators can trap toxic fumes and cause death. Experts say generators, as well as charcoal and gas burning grills, should always be used outdoors and never inside where they can't be properly ventilated. Florida has reported at least six carbon monoxide deaths since Irma. Possible symptoms include headaches, dizziness and nausea.

Categories: EMS

After Natural Disasters, Risk of Death and Injury Rises

JEMS - News - Thu, 09/14/2017 - 09:56

ATLANTA (AP) — Irma's deadly rampage is over but authorities say the risk of deaths and injuries rises significantly after natural disasters. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says all kinds of hazards can endanger storm survivors, returning evacuees, emergency responders and cleanup crews. "The aftermath of disasters such as Hurricanes Harvey and Irma can be just as dangerous as the storms themselves," notes CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald. And Orlando Fire Department Lt. Aaron Rhodes, notes stress and fatigue can lead to trouble after a disaster: "For one, people get tired, people get frustrated and start cutting corners."

Here's a look at some of the dangers:

Heat and humidity. Eight patients at a sweltering Hollywood, Florida, nursing home died after Irma knocked out the air conditioning. The deaths are being investigated as heat-related. Meanwhile, power outages afflicting millions in Florida could last days or more. Heat-related ailments can include dehydration and breathing difficulties. Experts say heat stroke can send the body's temperature soaring, while heat exhaustion can lead to heavy, sweaty, pale and clammy skin, a fast and weak pulse and even fainting. Heat cramps also can cause muscle spasms.

Lethal fumes such as carbon monoxide from gas-powered generators and clean-up equipment. Millions in Florida are without power and many turn to portable generators. When used improperly, generators can trap toxic fumes and cause death. Experts say generators, as well as charcoal and gas burning grills, should always be used outdoors and never inside where they can't be properly ventilated. Florida has reported at least six carbon monoxide deaths since Irma. Possible symptoms include headaches, dizziness and nausea.

Categories: EMS

8 Die at Florida Nursing Home in Irma's Sweltering Aftermath

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 09/13/2017 - 16:47

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. (AP) — Eight patients at a sweltering nursing home died after Hurricane Irma knocked out the air conditioning, raising fears Wednesday about the safety of Florida's 4 million senior citizens amid power outages that could go on for days.

Hollywood Police Chief Tom Sanchez said investigators believe the deaths at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills were heat-related, and added: "The building has been sealed off and we are conducting a criminal investigation."

Gov. Rick Scott called on Florida emergency workers to immediately check on nursing homes to make sure patients are safe, and he vowed to punish anyone found culpable in the deaths.

"This situation is unfathomable," he said.

The home said in a statement that the hurricane had knocked out a transformer that powered the AC.

Exactly how the deaths happened was under investigation, with Sanchez saying authorities have not ruled anything out, including carbon monoxide poisoning from generators. He also said investigators will look into how many windows were open.

Across the street from the nursing home sat a fully air-conditioned hospital, Memorial Regional.

"It's a sad state of affairs," the police chief said. "We all have elderly people in facilities, and we all know we depend on those people in those facilities to care for a vulnerable elderly population."

The deaths came as people trying to put their lives back together in hurricane-stricken Florida and beyond confronted a multitude of new hazards in the storm's aftermath, including tree-clearing accidents and lethal fumes from generators.

Not counting the nursing home deaths, at least 17 people in Florida have died under Irma-related circumstances, and six more in South Carolina and Georgia, many of them well after the storm had passed. The death toll across the Caribbean stood at 38.

At least six people died of apparent carbon monoxide poisoning from generators in Florida. A Tampa man died after the chain saw he was using to remove trees kicked back and cut his carotid artery.

Categories: EMS

8 Die at Florida Nursing Home in Irma's Sweltering Aftermath

JEMS - News - Wed, 09/13/2017 - 16:47

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. (AP) — Eight patients at a sweltering nursing home died after Hurricane Irma knocked out the air conditioning, raising fears Wednesday about the safety of Florida's 4 million senior citizens amid power outages that could go on for days.

Hollywood Police Chief Tom Sanchez said investigators believe the deaths at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills were heat-related, and added: "The building has been sealed off and we are conducting a criminal investigation."

Gov. Rick Scott called on Florida emergency workers to immediately check on nursing homes to make sure patients are safe, and he vowed to punish anyone found culpable in the deaths.

"This situation is unfathomable," he said.

The home said in a statement that the hurricane had knocked out a transformer that powered the AC.

Exactly how the deaths happened was under investigation, with Sanchez saying authorities have not ruled anything out, including carbon monoxide poisoning from generators. He also said investigators will look into how many windows were open.

Across the street from the nursing home sat a fully air-conditioned hospital, Memorial Regional.

"It's a sad state of affairs," the police chief said. "We all have elderly people in facilities, and we all know we depend on those people in those facilities to care for a vulnerable elderly population."

The deaths came as people trying to put their lives back together in hurricane-stricken Florida and beyond confronted a multitude of new hazards in the storm's aftermath, including tree-clearing accidents and lethal fumes from generators.

Not counting the nursing home deaths, at least 17 people in Florida have died under Irma-related circumstances, and six more in South Carolina and Georgia, many of them well after the storm had passed. The death toll across the Caribbean stood at 38.

At least six people died of apparent carbon monoxide poisoning from generators in Florida. A Tampa man died after the chain saw he was using to remove trees kicked back and cut his carotid artery.

Categories: EMS

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