EMS

6 Dead, 76 Missing After Strong Quake Hits Taiwan

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 02/07/2018 - 10:13

HUALIEN, Taiwan (AP) — Rescuers worked Wednesday to free people trapped after a strong earthquake near Taiwan's east coast caused several buildings to cave in and tilt dangerously. At least six people were killed and 76 could not be contacted following the quake.

At least four midsized buildings in worst-hit Hualien county leaned at sharp angles, their lowest floors crushed into mangled heaps of concrete, glass, iron and other debris. Firefighters climbed ladders hoisted against windows to reach residents inside apartments.

The shifting of the buildings after the magnitude 6.4 quake late Tuesday night was likely caused by soil liquefaction, when the ground beneath a building loses its solidity under stress such as that caused by an earthquake.

In this photo released by the Taiwan Presidential Office, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, center back-facing, is briefed at the site of a collapsed building from an earthquake, Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, in Hualien, southeastern Taiwan. Rescuers continue to search for dozens of unaccounted people for in several buildings damaged by a strong earthquake near the island's eastern coast. (Taiwan Presidential Office via AP)

A maintenance worker who was rescued after being trapped in the basement of the Marshal Hotel said the force of the earthquake was unusual even for a region used to temblors.

"At first it wasn't that big ... we get this sort of thing all the time and it's really nothing. But then it got really terrifying," the worker, Chen Ming-hui, told Taiwan's official Central News Agency after he was reunited with his son and grandson following the quake. "It was really scary."

Two employees of the hotel were killed in the disaster, CNA said. Taiwan's National Fire Agency said rescuers freed another employee from the rubble.

Categories: EMS

6 Dead, 76 Missing After Strong Quake Hits Taiwan

JEMS - News - Wed, 02/07/2018 - 10:13

HUALIEN, Taiwan (AP) — Rescuers worked Wednesday to free people trapped after a strong earthquake near Taiwan's east coast caused several buildings to cave in and tilt dangerously. At least six people were killed and 76 could not be contacted following the quake.

At least four midsized buildings in worst-hit Hualien county leaned at sharp angles, their lowest floors crushed into mangled heaps of concrete, glass, iron and other debris. Firefighters climbed ladders hoisted against windows to reach residents inside apartments.

The shifting of the buildings after the magnitude 6.4 quake late Tuesday night was likely caused by soil liquefaction, when the ground beneath a building loses its solidity under stress such as that caused by an earthquake.

In this photo released by the Taiwan Presidential Office, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, center back-facing, is briefed at the site of a collapsed building from an earthquake, Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, in Hualien, southeastern Taiwan. Rescuers continue to search for dozens of unaccounted people for in several buildings damaged by a strong earthquake near the island's eastern coast. (Taiwan Presidential Office via AP)

A maintenance worker who was rescued after being trapped in the basement of the Marshal Hotel said the force of the earthquake was unusual even for a region used to temblors.

"At first it wasn't that big ... we get this sort of thing all the time and it's really nothing. But then it got really terrifying," the worker, Chen Ming-hui, told Taiwan's official Central News Agency after he was reunited with his son and grandson following the quake. "It was really scary."

Two employees of the hotel were killed in the disaster, CNA said. Taiwan's National Fire Agency said rescuers freed another employee from the rubble.

Categories: EMS

United Hatzalah Opens New Chapter in Kiev, Inaugurates Ambulance in Uman

JEMS - News - Tue, 02/06/2018 - 19:41

Jerusalem - A moving ceremony took place on Sunday night in the central Chabad house of Kiev in Ukraine. 20 new volunteer EMTs graduated from their lengthy training program and will now be joining United Hatzalah's worldwide network of EMS volunteers. The EMT first responders will provide first aid and EMS coverage to all medical emergencies that take place in the Jewish communities in and around Kiev and throughout Ukraine.

Among the attendees at the ceremony were the Vice President of United Hatzalah Eli Pollack, CEO of United Hatzalah Moshe Teitelbaum, Deputy CEO of United Hatzalah Lazar Hyman, Chief Rabbi of Kiev and Ukraine Rabbi Moshe Reuven Asman and other dignitaries.

Chapter Head of United Hatzalah in Ukraine Rabbi Hillel Kook said: “I am happy and excited that volunteers from all of the different Jewish communities in Kiev have come together to participate in the course and graduate together to help all of the various communities in the city. They will be joining the ranks of United Hatzalah which now has more than 50 volunteers between Kiev and Uman. We are always working on expanding our reach to include all of the Jewish communities around the country and we are working on opening courses and having volunteers in each of the Jewish communities throughout Ukraine.”

New EMS graduates pose in Chabad house in Kiev

On Monday evening, a graduation ceremony took place in Uman which saw an additional 20 EMS volunteers join the ranks of the organization in that city. In addition, United Hatzalah inaugurated a new ambulance that will be present at all times in the heart of the Jewish community in the city. It will be stationed next to the gravesite of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the city. The ambulance was donated by Square Hatzalah from New York and funded by Rabbi Eliezer Kestenbaum.

Categories: EMS

Beyond Lucid Technologies Deploys the MEDIVIEW ePCR and BEACON Prehospital Health Information Exchange in Colorado, Ohio, and Oklahoma

JEMS - News - Tue, 02/06/2018 - 15:44

CONCORD, CA: Beyond Lucid Technologies, an award-winning health-and safety technology firm that makes software to connect EMS agencies and the care facility they serve, is proud to announce that in January 2018, it deployed the MEDIVIEW electronic patient care record platform (ePCR)—and its companion data access portal, the MEDIVIEW BEACON Prehospital Health Information Exchange, for export and integration of EMS data with care facilities—in Colorado, Oklahoma, and Ohio.                       

  • The COLORADO deployments include a fire service in greater Denver, and a countywide EMS service on the Western Slope.
  • The OHIO deployment is a fire service based in the Cincinnati area, which elected to transition to Beyond Lucid Technologies following the acquisition of Firehouse Software by ESO Solutions.
  • In OKLAHOMA, MEDIVIEW was deployed by one of the state’s fastest-growing private EMS agencies, which runs 9-1-1 responses, inter-facility transports, critical care transports, and special situation responses along the corridors from Oklahoma City north to Wichita, and east to Tulsa.

Each of these deployments includes access to the MEDIVIEW BEACON Prehospital Health Information Exchange, which enables care facilities to receive prehospital data in consumable formats—in as little as 30 seconds—so information captured en route arrives even before the ambulance does.  Such efficient data movement enables patient pre-registration, triage team activation, reduced wall times, and eliminates the need for faxes.  Unlike the months-long hospital-side data exchange projects required by other ePCR companies, MEDIVIEW BEACON can be deployed in under a week.  Jonathon Feit, Co-Founder & CEO of Beyond Lucid Technologies, said: “It’s an exciting time to be a data geek in the Fire and EMS business!”

According to Matt Miller, Owner/Director of Miller EMS in Medford, OK: “Our company experienced rapid growth since going into business in 2008.  We therefore needed a patient care reporting solution that let our administrative team focus on the company and where it was going. With patient care reporting as the backbone of our company’s viability, shortfalls from other programs were pulling our administrative team away from other important tasks.  Until we found MEDIVIEW, nothing really fit our needs. Other systems lost data, file searches were cumbersome, and vendors wanted to tell us what was best for us, rather than really listening and addressing our needs. The BLT team worked with us for several months to ensure that their product was tailored to us.  They delivered on every request we had and allowed ample time for our administrative team and field personnel to work with the program. We plan to continue growing and plan to rely on MEDIVIEW for the long haul, especially as we integrate even more closely with our local hospitals."

Categories: EMS

Passengers Recount Smoke, Blood on Crashed S. Carolina Train

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 02/06/2018 - 10:24

CAYCE, S.C. (AP) — Passengers on a train that slammed into an empty freight train over the weekend in South Carolina, killing two Amtrak employees, described a smoky, bloody scene in 911 calls released to the news media.

"There's babies with their heads busted wide open, bleeding," one woman said to a dispatcher in a call released Tuesday to WIS-TV . "Everybody flew to the front of the train. ... Everything is everywhere."

In another call, a man described seeing smoke inside the cars and "a lot of people hurt." An Amtrak employee asks dispatchers to send "plenty of help" for the injured.

In interviews with The Associated Press, passengers have described seats ripped from their rows and luggage strewn about the passenger compartments after the crash early Sunday morning near Cayce (CAY-see), South Carolina. The conductor and engineer aboard the New York-to-Miami Amtrak train were killed when that craft collided with a CSX Corp. freight train parked on a side track. More than 100 passengers were treated at hospitals for injuries.

"We're on the train, but some of us have chest pains," another man told a dispatcher. "We need some help. ... I've got to sit down, I can't breathe."

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday that railway signals were out at the time of the crash while crews installed a safety system that could have prevented the exact type of wreck that killed engineer Michael Kempf and conductor Michael Cella.

Automated signals that could have warned the passenger train to stop before reaching the switch sending it down the side track were turned off as workers installed a GPS-based system called positive train control, or PTC, NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt said.

A day before, Sumwalt told reporters "an operational PTC is designed to prevent this type of incident."

Federal investigators also said a locked manual switch forced the passenger train onto the side track where the empty freight train was parked after having offloaded its cargo nearby.

Categories: EMS

Passengers Recount Smoke, Blood on Crashed S. Carolina Train

JEMS - News - Tue, 02/06/2018 - 10:24

CAYCE, S.C. (AP) — Passengers on a train that slammed into an empty freight train over the weekend in South Carolina, killing two Amtrak employees, described a smoky, bloody scene in 911 calls released to the news media.

"There's babies with their heads busted wide open, bleeding," one woman said to a dispatcher in a call released Tuesday to WIS-TV . "Everybody flew to the front of the train. ... Everything is everywhere."

In another call, a man described seeing smoke inside the cars and "a lot of people hurt." An Amtrak employee asks dispatchers to send "plenty of help" for the injured.

In interviews with The Associated Press, passengers have described seats ripped from their rows and luggage strewn about the passenger compartments after the crash early Sunday morning near Cayce (CAY-see), South Carolina. The conductor and engineer aboard the New York-to-Miami Amtrak train were killed when that craft collided with a CSX Corp. freight train parked on a side track. More than 100 passengers were treated at hospitals for injuries.

"We're on the train, but some of us have chest pains," another man told a dispatcher. "We need some help. ... I've got to sit down, I can't breathe."

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday that railway signals were out at the time of the crash while crews installed a safety system that could have prevented the exact type of wreck that killed engineer Michael Kempf and conductor Michael Cella.

Automated signals that could have warned the passenger train to stop before reaching the switch sending it down the side track were turned off as workers installed a GPS-based system called positive train control, or PTC, NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt said.

A day before, Sumwalt told reporters "an operational PTC is designed to prevent this type of incident."

Federal investigators also said a locked manual switch forced the passenger train onto the side track where the empty freight train was parked after having offloaded its cargo nearby.

Categories: EMS

Where in the World of EMS Was A.J. Heightman on Superbowl Sunday

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 02/05/2018 - 13:30

JEMS Editor-in-Chief A.J. Heightman taught a 2-day class on mass casualty incident (MCI) management in Mifflin County, Penn., this past weekend sponsored by The Hospital and Healthy System Association of Pennsylvania and FAME EMS. Find out more by watching the video below and reading an article about the training that appeared in The Sentinal.

Categories: EMS

Patients to Address Court in Doctor's Opioid Kickback Scheme

JEMS - News - Mon, 02/05/2018 - 10:34

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Victims of a scheme in which a doctor prescribed them a highly addictive opioid spray in exchange for kickbacks are expected to tell a federal judge how their lives were affected, including stories of overdoses, monthslong withdrawals, weight loss and broken bones from falling while on the powerful drug.

Jerrold Rosenberg told one patient, "Stop crying, you're acting like a child," when she complained of severe side effects, which included losing 40 pounds and repeated vomiting for years, according to an excerpt of grand jury testimony filed by prosecutors in the case.

Thursday's hearing before U.S. District Judge Jack McConnell is scheduled to help him determine the severity of Rosenberg's crimes, including the number of victims. Rosenberg pleaded guilty in October to health care fraud and kickbacks conspiracy. He faces a maximum 15 years in prison.

The criminal case is one of several around the country brought against people associated with Insys Therapeutics and the prescribing of Subsys, which is meant only for cancer patients with severe pain. Rosenberg has admitted that he prescribed Subsys to people who didn't have cancer and that he took $188,000 in kickbacks for writing the prescriptions.

In documents filed last week, the U.S. Attorney's office in Providence laid out the stories of several patients who testified before a grand jury that they were hurt by Rosenberg's practices. Among them were two patients who overdosed but survived after receiving the opioid antidote Narcan, according to documents filed in the case.

Rosenberg's lawyer did not immediately return an email seeking comment Monday, but he said in a filing in December that he disputes the number of people hurt by Rosenberg's practices. He also disputes prosecutors' contention about the overdoses, saying there's no evidence the overdoses were caused by Rosenberg's prescriptions.

The patients were not identified by name in court papers.

Categories: EMS

New Report Details Misuse of Antipsychotics in Nursing Homes

JEMS - News - Mon, 02/05/2018 - 10:18

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. nursing homes have significantly reduced the use of powerful antipsychotic drugs among their elderly residents, responding to pressure from many directions. Yet advocacy groups insist that overmedication remains a major problem, and want the pressure to intensify.

According to the latest data from the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, known as CMS, the percentage of long-term nursing home residents being given antipsychotic drugs dropped from about 24 percent in late 2011 to under 16 percent last year. Decreases were reported in all 50 states, with the biggest in Tennessee, California and Arkansas.

Dr. Jerry Gurwitz, chief of geriatric medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, depicts the overall decrease as "one of the most dramatic changes I've seen in my career." He wonders, however, if some nursing homes might be finding other medications that sedate their patients into passivity without drawing the same level of scrutiny as antipsychotics.

Advocacy groups — including the Washington-based Center for Medicare Advocacy and AARP Foundation Litigation — say even the lower rate of antipsychotic usage is excessive, given federal warnings that elderly people with dementia face a higher risk of death when treated with such drugs.

"Given the dire consequences, it should be zero," said attorney Kelly Bagby of the AARP foundation, which has engaged in several court cases challenging nursing home medication practices. Bagby contends that the drugs are frequently used for their sedative effect, not because they have any benefit to the recipients.

The advocacy groups' long-running campaign was reinforced Monday with the release of a detailed report by Human Rights Watch urging federal and state authorities to take tougher measures against improper use of antipsychotic drugs.

"On paper, nursing home residents have strong legal protections of their rights, but in practice, enforcement is often lacking," said the report, based on interviews with more than 300 people and visits to 109 nursing homes in six states.

Categories: EMS

Inside EMS Podcast: Top communication issues facing EMS, fire and police chiefs

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Mon, 02/05/2018 - 08:37
Inside EMS Podcast: Top communication issues facing EMS, fire and police chiefs by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Leading Ambulance Manufacturers Braun Industries and Demers Ambulances Joining Forces

JEMS - News - Fri, 02/02/2018 - 22:38

Beloeil, Quebec, and Van Wert, Ohio – Demers Ambulances, a Quebec-based leader in the design, manufacturing, and distribution of ambulances in Canada, is merging with Braun Industries, Inc., a leader in custom ambulance manufacturing based in Ohio serving customers throughout the U.S. The combination of expertise, trusted leadership, safety-driven products, values and cultures creates a leading player within the evolving specialty vehicle industry. The terms of the merger are not disclosed.

Demers is a Quebec entrepreneurial success and the oldest continuous ambulance manufacturer in North America with ambulances in service worldwide. For Demers, this merger helps the company realize its ambition of dramatically increasing its North American market share and competing on a global scale. The merger with Braun creates the second largest ambulance manufacturer in North America and provides greater scale to pursue innovation and international growth.

Braun is a family-owned company that has been manufacturing custom, high-quality ambulances since 1972. With an extensive dealer network, dedicated workforce and established brand throughout the U.S., Braun delivers hundreds of ambulances each year. For Braun, the merger provides an increased capacity to drive product enhancements, improve product value, and to better serve more customers across the U.S. network.

 “We are very pleased with our progress in strengthening our presence and pursuing growth,” said Alain Brunelle, CEO of Demers Ambulances. “Partnering with Braun provides us the right opportunity to better serve and service our customers, strengthen our employee base, and enhance our capacity to operate and innovate in a competitive, global industry. Together, we look forward to growing the combined company and to meeting the industry’s needs with even better products and service excellence.”

Categories: EMS

Leading Ambulance Makers Demers and Braun Announce Merger

JEMS - News - Fri, 02/02/2018 - 08:45

Beloeil, Quebec, and Van Wert, Ohio – In a major industry move, Demers Ambulances, a Quebec-based leader in the design, manufacturing, and distribution of ambulances in Canada, is merging with Braun Industries, Inc., a leader in custom ambulance manufacturing based in Ohio serving customers throughout the U.S.

In a press conference held to announce the merger, Demers and Braun officials emphasized the great synergy between the two manufacturers; both are third-generation family businesses with deeply-rooted family values, a commitment to safety and a passion for their people.

Innovation & Growth

The goal of the merger is to give both brands a larger scale for innovation and growth while continuing to build highly-regarded products for the EMS industry and customizing vehicles to meet the needs of their customers—which has been a hallmark of both brands. The terms of the merger were not disclosed.

Demers is the oldest continuous ambulance manufacturer in North America, with ambulances in service worldwide. For Demers, the merger helps the company realize its ambition of dramatically increasing its North American market share and compete on a global scale.

“We are very pleased with our progress in strengthening our presence and pursuing growth,” said Alain Brunelle, CEO of Demers Ambulances. “Partnering with Braun provides us the right opportunity to better serve and service our customers, strengthen our employee base, and enhance our capacity to operate and innovate in a competitive, global industry. Together, we look forward to growing the combined company and to meeting the industry’s needs with even better products and service excellence. Our joint goal is to build the best and safest ambulances in the market.”

Categories: EMS

ESO Hires Brent Myers, M.D. as Chief Medical Officer

JEMS - News - Thu, 02/01/2018 - 12:37

AUSTIN, TexasESO Solutions, Inc., the leading data and software company serving emergency medical services (EMS), hospitals and fire departments, today announced the hiring of Brent Myers, MD, MPH, FACEP, FAEMS as Chief Medical Officer.

“We are honored and excited to add someone with Brent’s passion, talent and expertise to the ESO team,” said Chris Dillie, President and CEO of ESO. “Brent will play a significant role in the success of our customers as we continue to strengthen the medical rigor behind our applications that help the agencies, hospitals and industry we support turn data into insights and actions that improve patient outcomes.”

Dr. Myers brings almost two decades of leadership experience as a medical practitioner, both in the field and in implementation of technologies to improve outcomes. Most recently, he was the Chief Medical Officer and Executive Vice President for Medical Operations for Evolution Health. Dr. Myers also serves as the President of the National Association of EMS Physicians. He has been the Director and Medical Director for Wake County Department of EMS, as well as held a senior medical consulting role with ESO. Dr. Myers holds an M.D. from the Wake Forest School of Medicine and a Master’s from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. He is double board certified in the areas of Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

“The focus on patient outcomes and value-based services in healthcare is not only changing the way we take care of people in our communities and blurring the lines between community safety and public health, it is also changing the expectations first responders, community paramedicine professionals, and emergency departments have for the role of software and technology regarding when, where and how we treat patients,” said Dr. Myers. “With the strength of their portfolio of products, ESO is at the forefront of helping agencies and organizations of all sizes and locations better share data, leverage those data to make more informed decisions, and ultimately improve patient outcomes by providing improved services more effectively and efficiently. ”

Categories: EMS

Lawmakers Put Medical Skills to Work After Train Crash

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 02/01/2018 - 10:20

CROZET, Va. (AP) — Republican members of Congress with medical experience put their skills to work after a train carrying dozens of them crashed into a garbage truck in rural Virginia, killing one person in the truck and injuring others.

The lawmakers were on their way to a strategy retreat in the countryside when the collision occurred around 11:20 a.m. Wednesday in Crozet, about 125 miles (200 kilometers) southwest of Washington.

No serious injuries were reported aboard the chartered Amtrak train, which set out from the nation's capital with lawmakers, family members and staff for the luxury Greenbrier resort in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. At least two other people in the truck were reported seriously hurt.

Rep. James Comer of Kentucky said about 100 Republican lawmakers were on the train when the crash made him jump out of his seat.

"I looked out the side of the window and then I could see a truck, just in pieces out the side of the window," Comer said. He said Capitol police officers quickly jumped off the train but came back and asked for any doctors to help.

Florida Rep. Neal Dunn, a former Army surgeon, said he and other lawmakers who are doctors joined other passengers who are nurses or paramedics and jumped out with the basic medical gear they had. They broke into three teams to help the injured people in the truck, he said.

"The first gentleman was somebody who had really, really, really devastating injuries. We did try to resuscitate, but ultimately you had to realize it wasn't possible," Dunn said.

The Albemarle County Police Department identified the passenger killed as Christopher Foley, 28, of Louisa County.

Dunn said another man in the truck was critically injured and a third was seriously hurt.

Categories: EMS

Lawmakers Put Medical Skills to Work After Train Crash

JEMS - News - Thu, 02/01/2018 - 10:20

CROZET, Va. (AP) — Republican members of Congress with medical experience put their skills to work after a train carrying dozens of them crashed into a garbage truck in rural Virginia, killing one person in the truck and injuring others.

The lawmakers were on their way to a strategy retreat in the countryside when the collision occurred around 11:20 a.m. Wednesday in Crozet, about 125 miles (200 kilometers) southwest of Washington.

No serious injuries were reported aboard the chartered Amtrak train, which set out from the nation's capital with lawmakers, family members and staff for the luxury Greenbrier resort in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. At least two other people in the truck were reported seriously hurt.

Rep. James Comer of Kentucky said about 100 Republican lawmakers were on the train when the crash made him jump out of his seat.

"I looked out the side of the window and then I could see a truck, just in pieces out the side of the window," Comer said. He said Capitol police officers quickly jumped off the train but came back and asked for any doctors to help.

Florida Rep. Neal Dunn, a former Army surgeon, said he and other lawmakers who are doctors joined other passengers who are nurses or paramedics and jumped out with the basic medical gear they had. They broke into three teams to help the injured people in the truck, he said.

"The first gentleman was somebody who had really, really, really devastating injuries. We did try to resuscitate, but ultimately you had to realize it wasn't possible," Dunn said.

The Albemarle County Police Department identified the passenger killed as Christopher Foley, 28, of Louisa County.

Dunn said another man in the truck was critically injured and a third was seriously hurt.

Categories: EMS

Train Crash in Virginia

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 02/01/2018 - 10:12

Categories: EMS

Helicopter Crashes into Calif. Home, Leaves 3 Dead, 2 Injured

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 01/31/2018 - 09:58

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Three people were killed and two others were injured when a helicopter crashed into a house in a suburban Southern California neighborhood just a few minutes after taking off, officials said.

The helicopter crashed into the house with such force that it was barely recognizable. The crushed metal sat in a heap on the side of the house, its tail rotor sticking out of the roof of a nearby home and a 6-foot chunk landing in the street in front of yet another house.

This still frame from video provided by KNBC-TV shows the wreckage of a Robinson R44 helicopter after it crashed into a home in Newport Beach, Calif., Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. (KABC-TV via AP)

"All of a sudden the house just shook and I thought, 'Oh my gosh, we're having an earthquake,'" said Marian Michaels, who lives behind the home in a gated community in Newport Beach where the helicopter crashed.

Roger Johnson was doing some woodwork when he heard the chopping sound of a helicopter's rotating blades and then a tremendous boom across the street.

"I turned to look out of the garage and that's when I see this piece of metal flying through the air and hitting a bush and garage door," Johnson said. "Then I heard someone scream — a real for-real horror scream, like something terrible had happened."

Johnson rushed to the wreckage and cautioned people to stop trying to pull out or move victims.

Four people were aboard the Robinson R44 helicopter when it went down. All four were among those killed or injured, and one person who was on the ground but outside of the house was also injured, Newport Beach fire and police officials said. They did not say which was which, or give any specifics about the injuries.

Audrey Ellis, who lives next to the house where the crash happened, was not home at the time but said her neighbors told her they were in the kitchen when the helicopter hit the bedroom of their house.

Categories: EMS

Helicopter Crashes into Calif. Home, Leaves 3 Dead, 2 Injured

JEMS - News - Wed, 01/31/2018 - 09:58

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Three people were killed and two others were injured when a helicopter crashed into a house in a suburban Southern California neighborhood just a few minutes after taking off, officials said.

The helicopter crashed into the house with such force that it was barely recognizable. The crushed metal sat in a heap on the side of the house, its tail rotor sticking out of the roof of a nearby home and a 6-foot chunk landing in the street in front of yet another house.

This still frame from video provided by KNBC-TV shows the wreckage of a Robinson R44 helicopter after it crashed into a home in Newport Beach, Calif., Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. (KABC-TV via AP)

"All of a sudden the house just shook and I thought, 'Oh my gosh, we're having an earthquake,'" said Marian Michaels, who lives behind the home in a gated community in Newport Beach where the helicopter crashed.

Roger Johnson was doing some woodwork when he heard the chopping sound of a helicopter's rotating blades and then a tremendous boom across the street.

"I turned to look out of the garage and that's when I see this piece of metal flying through the air and hitting a bush and garage door," Johnson said. "Then I heard someone scream — a real for-real horror scream, like something terrible had happened."

Johnson rushed to the wreckage and cautioned people to stop trying to pull out or move victims.

Four people were aboard the Robinson R44 helicopter when it went down. All four were among those killed or injured, and one person who was on the ground but outside of the house was also injured, Newport Beach fire and police officials said. They did not say which was which, or give any specifics about the injuries.

Audrey Ellis, who lives next to the house where the crash happened, was not home at the time but said her neighbors told her they were in the kitchen when the helicopter hit the bedroom of their house.

Categories: EMS

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