EMS

Powerful Quake on Iran-Iraq Border Leaves Over 400 Dead

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 11/13/2017 - 09:02

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — A powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake near the Iraq-Iran border killed over 400 people across both countries, sent residents fleeing their homes into the night and was felt as far away as the Mediterranean coast, authorities said Monday.

Iran's western Kermanshah province bore the brunt of the temblor Sunday night, with authorities saying the quake killed 407 people in the country and injured 6,700. Kermanshah is a rural, mountainous region where residents rely mainly on farming.

In Iraq, the earthquake killed at least seven people and injured 535, all in the country's northern Kurdish region, according to Iraq's Interior Ministry.

The quake was centered 19 miles (31 kilometers) outside the eastern Iraqi city of Halabja, according to the most recent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey. It struck at 9:48 p.m. Iran time, just as people began retiring for the night.

It could be felt on the Mediterranean coast, some 660 miles (1,000 kilometers) away.

The earthquake struck 23.2 kilometers (14.4 miles) below the surface, a shallow depth that can amplify damage. Magnitude 7 earthquakes can be highly destructive.

Iranian social media and news agencies showed images and videos of people fleeing their homes. More than 100 aftershocks followed.

The quake's worst damage appeared to be in the town of Sarpol-e-Zahab in Kermanshah province, which sits in the Zagros Mountains that divide Iran and Iraq.

Kokab Fard, a 49-year-old housewife in Sarpol-e-Zahab, said she fled empty-handed when her apartment complex collapsed. "Immediately after I managed to get out, the building collapsed," Fard said. "I have no access to my belongings."

Reza Mohammadi, 51, said he and his family ran out into the alley after the first shock. "I tried to get back to pick up some stuff but it totally collapsed in the second wave," Mohammadi said.

Sarpol-e-Zahab residents said the power and water were out and telephone and cellphone lines were spotty.

Categories: EMS

Powerful Quake on Iran-Iraq Border Leaves Over 400 Dead

JEMS - News - Mon, 11/13/2017 - 09:02

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — A powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake near the Iraq-Iran border killed over 400 people across both countries, sent residents fleeing their homes into the night and was felt as far away as the Mediterranean coast, authorities said Monday.

Iran's western Kermanshah province bore the brunt of the temblor Sunday night, with authorities saying the quake killed 407 people in the country and injured 6,700. Kermanshah is a rural, mountainous region where residents rely mainly on farming.

In Iraq, the earthquake killed at least seven people and injured 535, all in the country's northern Kurdish region, according to Iraq's Interior Ministry.

The quake was centered 19 miles (31 kilometers) outside the eastern Iraqi city of Halabja, according to the most recent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey. It struck at 9:48 p.m. Iran time, just as people began retiring for the night.

It could be felt on the Mediterranean coast, some 660 miles (1,000 kilometers) away.

The earthquake struck 23.2 kilometers (14.4 miles) below the surface, a shallow depth that can amplify damage. Magnitude 7 earthquakes can be highly destructive.

Iranian social media and news agencies showed images and videos of people fleeing their homes. More than 100 aftershocks followed.

The quake's worst damage appeared to be in the town of Sarpol-e-Zahab in Kermanshah province, which sits in the Zagros Mountains that divide Iran and Iraq.

Kokab Fard, a 49-year-old housewife in Sarpol-e-Zahab, said she fled empty-handed when her apartment complex collapsed. "Immediately after I managed to get out, the building collapsed," Fard said. "I have no access to my belongings."

Reza Mohammadi, 51, said he and his family ran out into the alley after the first shock. "I tried to get back to pick up some stuff but it totally collapsed in the second wave," Mohammadi said.

Sarpol-e-Zahab residents said the power and water were out and telephone and cellphone lines were spotty.

Categories: EMS

the california association of air medical services (cal-aams) is offering continued training and education for the air medical and critical care transport communities.

JEMS - News - Sun, 11/12/2017 - 23:00
Starting on November 13, 2017 at Morongo Casino Resort, and again on November 15, 2017, at The Aerospace Museum of California, this years theme, “UNTIED WE STAND“ Safety Summit is Free to attend to all air medical and critical care transport providers.

All other EMS providers such as; law enforcement, fire, search and rescue, and any other EMS ground responders who are also encouraged to attend. This years trainings will focus on team work and safety for patient, crew and ground personnel through out the flight and mission. Contact:Cal-AAMS | “UNITED WE STAND” Safety Summit 2017
Contact: Temple Fletcher,
Cal-AAMS Safety Summit Coordinator
775. 691.2323
tfletcher@remsa-cf.com Email:tfletcher@remsa-cf.com Web site:http:www.calaams.org
Categories: EMS

Study Suggests Women Less Likely to Get CPR From Bystanders

JEMS - News - Sun, 11/12/2017 - 08:52

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman's chest might be one reason.

Only 39 percent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 percent of men, and men were 23 percent more likely to survive, the study found.

It involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country and is the first to examine gender differences in receiving heart help from the public versus  professional responders.

"It can be kind of daunting thinking about pushing hard and fast on the center of a woman's chest" and some people may fear they are hurting her, said Audrey Blewer, a University of Pennsylvania researcher who led the study.

Rescuers also may worry about moving a woman's clothing to get better access, or touching breasts to do CPR, but doing it properly "shouldn't entail that," said another study leader, U Penn's Dr. Benjamin Abella. "You put your hands on the sternum, which is the middle of the chest. In theory, you're touching in between the breasts."

The study was discussed Sunday at an American Heart Association conference in Anaheim.

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops pumping, usually because of a rhythm problem. More than 350,000 Americans each year suffer one in settings other than a hospital. About 90 percent of them die, but CPR can double or triple survival odds.

"This is not a time to be squeamish because it's a life and death situation," Abella said.

Researchers had no information on rescuers or why they may have been less likely to help women. But no gender difference was seen in CPR rates for people who were stricken at home, where a rescuer is more likely to know the person needing help.

The findings suggest that CPR training may need to be improved. Even that may be subtly biased toward males — practice mannequins (they're not called "woman-nequins") are usually male torsos, Blewer said.

Categories: EMS

Puckett EMS Personnel Honored with Public Safety Appreciation Award by South Cobb Area Council

JEMS - News - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 22:04

Puckett EMS Paramedic Jordan Doty and AEMT Sam White recently were honored for outstanding service in protecting public safety by the South Cobb Area Council of the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce at the organization’s annual Public Safety Appreciation Luncheon on November 1.

The South Cobb Area Council recognized the team for their commitment to the community and for their exceptional ability to perform their duties under the most strenuous of circumstances.

“These gentlemen exemplify the dedication and spirit that our crews here at Puckett EMS have,” said Puckett EMS Information Officer Jim McMichen. “That can’t be taught. It’s a culture that permeates throughout our company because of great clinicians like Jordan and Sam.” 

Last year, the team showed outstanding clinical skill and quick action when responding to a motorcycle injury in Mableton, Georgia. The motorcyclist had collided with a fire hydrant and was unconscious and not breathing. Before arriving on the scene, the team developed a treatment plan, which they executed efficiently once on-scene. The team confirmed that the patient had no pulse, initiated CPR and prepared the patient for transport.

In less than six minutes, Doty and White were able to begin the initial treatment, fully immobilize the patient due to a suspected spinal injury and prepare the patient for transport. While White drove the team to Grady’s Marcus Trauma Center, Doty diligently continued to perform CPR and was able to initiate several IVs to provide fluid resuscitation. 

The patient had a return of spontaneous circulation during transport, and Doty and White continued to provide care as they entered the trauma bay at Grady and transferred care to the awaiting trauma team.

Though the patient ultimately died from his injuries, the family had a few additional days with their loved one and made the decision to donate his organs to help save the lives of many individuals in need of transplants.

Categories: EMS

DT Research Announces First Complete Vehicle Mount Tablet Solution Purpose-built for First Responders, Field Service and Military

JEMS - News - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 21:47

PHILADELPHIA, IACP 2017 - October 23, 2017 – DT Research, the leading designer and manufacturer of purpose-built computing solutions for vertical markets, today announced a complete vehicle mount tablet solution that includes a 12.5 inch Full HD display tablet (optional 4K Ultra HD) with a slim folding keyboard cradle. This is the first rugged tablet and vehicle mount solution designed by one manufacturer to ensure guaranteed compatibility and seamless interoperability for superior information capture/transfer and mobile communications through a dual pass-through antenna.

The light, durable and highly reliable IP65 military standard DT325T tablet can be used in and out of vehicles or wall mounted. DT Research carefully designed these purpose-built tablets for first responders, military, law enforcement, field service, manufacturing and warehousing environments.

The DT325T rugged tablet and mounting solution will be showcased at the IACP 2017 Conference (International Association of Chiefs of Police) in Philadelphia from October 21-24, 2017 in booth 1710.

“We saw a need in the market for a more versatile tablet that could be used in and out of vehicles,” said Daw Tsai Sc.D., president of DT Research. “Other mountable tablets are too bulky and do not consider how the tablets will be used in real-world situations. Our vehicle mount tablet solution mirrors the unique features needed in first responder, law enforcement and field service environments.”

Categories: EMS

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits

JEMS - News - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 18:01

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room.

Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill.

"How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for."

In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cross-Blue Shield insurer has told customers in a few U.S. states to go to the hospital only in a real emergency such as a heart attack, stroke and major bleeding — or they could wind up footing the bill.

Anthem, the nation's second-largest insurer, wants patients to consider alternatives like drugstore clinics, nurse advice hotlines or telemedicine. Insurers for years have been raising ER co-payments to try to deter unnecessary — and expensive — visits, and Anthem's policy marks another round in this long-standing fight.

Even doctors agree the ER — an important revenue source for hospitals — isn't the best option for minor complaints like sinus infections, rashes or ankle sprains. They say it's better in those cases to see a family doctor who knows a person's medical history.

But some also worry that Anthem's clampdown will scare patients away from the ER in an actual emergency, especially in cases where major problems may not seem serious at first.

"I think it's completely unfair to patients," said Dr. Jesse Pines, who teaches emergency medicine at George Washington University. "It runs the risk of really hurting some people."

Customers in Missouri and Georgia received letters earlier this year from Anthem warning them that minor complaints should be checked out at places like clinics or urgent care centers, where visits can cost $85 and $190, respectively. By comparison, Anthem says a typical ER visit costs around $1,200.

Categories: EMS

Inside EMS Podcast: Bringing tactical EMS to initial curricula

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 15:23
Inside EMS Podcast: Bringing tactical EMS to initial curricula by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Las Vegas Shooting Victims Search for Their Heroes

JEMS - News - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 10:19

LOS ANGELES (AP) — As soon as Chris Gilman knew she would survive the gunshot wound she sustained in the Las Vegas massacre, she wanted to find the two strangers who saved her life — a man and woman whose names she didn't even know.

She found a Facebook page called "Find My LV Hero" and posted a plea.

"Looking for husband and wife who were by the VIP bleachers and helped me get out," wrote Gilman, of Bonney Lake, Washington. "My wife gave the husband her shirt and the wife held it against my side to stop bleeding as they carried me through the VIP area out to the street."

Despite the scant details in Gilman's post, it worked. Three days later, Gilman connected with her rescuers, Alex and Wanda Valiente, off-duty Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies who were at the Oct. 1 concert where a gunman opened fire from the 32nd floor of a hotel, killing 58 people and wounding hundreds.

The connection is one of about 25 made so far through the Facebook page. Nearly six weeks after the massacre, Ashton Zyer's social media creation continues to generate new searches for heroes who in some cases saved lives and in others simply provided what comfort they could.

Zyer, a Las Vegas singer/songwriter, said she started the page after seeing several people in her large social media network post about trying to find someone.

Meghan Earley posted that she was looking for a security guard and a Las Vegas police officer who helped her escape.

"Because of their bravery I only have a sprained ankle, cuts and bruises, as well as a concussion and some broken teeth," she wrote on Oct. 14. "You both are my heroes forever!!!"

Myrna Lopez is looking for a paramedic who gave the socks off his feet to her friend when he saw her running barefoot.

Categories: EMS

Las Vegas Shooting Victims Search for Their Heroes

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 10:19

LOS ANGELES (AP) — As soon as Chris Gilman knew she would survive the gunshot wound she sustained in the Las Vegas massacre, she wanted to find the two strangers who saved her life — a man and woman whose names she didn't even know.

She found a Facebook page called "Find My LV Hero" and posted a plea.

"Looking for husband and wife who were by the VIP bleachers and helped me get out," wrote Gilman, of Bonney Lake, Washington. "My wife gave the husband her shirt and the wife held it against my side to stop bleeding as they carried me through the VIP area out to the street."

Despite the scant details in Gilman's post, it worked. Three days later, Gilman connected with her rescuers, Alex and Wanda Valiente, off-duty Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies who were at the Oct. 1 concert where a gunman opened fire from the 32nd floor of a hotel, killing 58 people and wounding hundreds.

The connection is one of about 25 made so far through the Facebook page. Nearly six weeks after the massacre, Ashton Zyer's social media creation continues to generate new searches for heroes who in some cases saved lives and in others simply provided what comfort they could.

Zyer, a Las Vegas singer/songwriter, said she started the page after seeing several people in her large social media network post about trying to find someone.

Meghan Earley posted that she was looking for a security guard and a Las Vegas police officer who helped her escape.

"Because of their bravery I only have a sprained ankle, cuts and bruises, as well as a concussion and some broken teeth," she wrote on Oct. 14. "You both are my heroes forever!!!"

Myrna Lopez is looking for a paramedic who gave the socks off his feet to her friend when he saw her running barefoot.

Categories: EMS

Medics Recall Scene at Texas Church Shooting

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 09:38

LA VERNIA, Texas (AP) — By the time Paul Brunner rolled up in his ambulance to the worst mass shooting in Texas history, the First Baptist Church was a chaotic triage scene. Parents cried and kids screamed, and nearly all the victims appeared to have been hit more than once.

Two of the first four patients the burly volunteer medic loaded into ambulances were children.

"Our inclination is to protect children. The thing is, that wasn't his inclination," Brunner said, referring to the gunman. "He wasn't separating going: 'I'm not going to hurt the kids. I'm going to go after whatever adults wronged me.'"

When gunfire tore through the church in tiny Sutherland Springs, killing more than two dozen, the bullets claimed eight children and teenagers who were sitting through Sunday services with their families. It was the largest number of children killed in a mass shooting since 20 died at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012.

Like that massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, the fact that the assailant slaughtered defenseless children compounded the anguish. Nearby schools quickly added grief counselors.

The shooter, Devin Patrick Kelley, had a turbulent and violent past that included a court-martial while serving in the Air Force on charges that he assaulted his then-wife and hit her child hard enough to fracture the boy's skull. Kelley, who had a rifle and left behind at least 15 empty magazines holding 30 rounds each, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound after he was chased by bystanders and crashed his car.

Investigators have said the shooting appeared to stem from a domestic dispute involving Kelley and his mother-in-law, who sometimes attended services at the church but was not present on Sunday.

One couple who survived the attack, Rosanne Solis and Joaquin Ramirez, said Kelley went aisle by aisle through the pews and shot crying children at point-blank range.

Authorities put the death count at 26, including the unborn baby of one of the slain women and the 14-year-old daughter of the church's pastor, Frank Pomeroy.

Categories: EMS

Medics Recall Scene at Texas Church Shooting

JEMS - News - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 09:38

LA VERNIA, Texas (AP) — By the time Paul Brunner rolled up in his ambulance to the worst mass shooting in Texas history, the First Baptist Church was a chaotic triage scene. Parents cried and kids screamed, and nearly all the victims appeared to have been hit more than once.

Two of the first four patients the burly volunteer medic loaded into ambulances were children.

"Our inclination is to protect children. The thing is, that wasn't his inclination," Brunner said, referring to the gunman. "He wasn't separating going: 'I'm not going to hurt the kids. I'm going to go after whatever adults wronged me.'"

When gunfire tore through the church in tiny Sutherland Springs, killing more than two dozen, the bullets claimed eight children and teenagers who were sitting through Sunday services with their families. It was the largest number of children killed in a mass shooting since 20 died at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012.

Like that massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, the fact that the assailant slaughtered defenseless children compounded the anguish. Nearby schools quickly added grief counselors.

The shooter, Devin Patrick Kelley, had a turbulent and violent past that included a court-martial while serving in the Air Force on charges that he assaulted his then-wife and hit her child hard enough to fracture the boy's skull. Kelley, who had a rifle and left behind at least 15 empty magazines holding 30 rounds each, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound after he was chased by bystanders and crashed his car.

Investigators have said the shooting appeared to stem from a domestic dispute involving Kelley and his mother-in-law, who sometimes attended services at the church but was not present on Sunday.

One couple who survived the attack, Rosanne Solis and Joaquin Ramirez, said Kelley went aisle by aisle through the pews and shot crying children at point-blank range.

Authorities put the death count at 26, including the unborn baby of one of the slain women and the 14-year-old daughter of the church's pastor, Frank Pomeroy.

Categories: EMS

Pennsylvania Trooper Saves Own Life With Tourniquet

JEMS - News - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 13:31

A Pennsylvania State Police trooper who was shot several times during a traffic stop likely saved his own life by applying a tourniquet to his leg before help arrived, authorities said Wednesday as they released more details of the violent confrontation along a busy highway.

Cpl. Seth Kelly, 39, remained hospitalized in critical condition after suffering gunshot wounds to his neck and shoulder area and to his leg in the close-quarters gunfight. The 13-year veteran was set to undergo another surgery to remove a bullet.

"He's battling. He's certainly not out of the woods by any means, but ... he is a very strong individual, and he displayed a will yesterday that he wanted to live and get through this," state police Capt. Richard D'Ambrosio said at a press conference.

In this undated photo released by the Pennsylvania State Police, Cpl. Seth J. Kelly, is shown. Authorities have identified Kelly as the Pennsylvania State Police trooper who was shot several times Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, during a traffic stop and remains hospitalized in critical condition. (Pennsylvania State Police via AP Photo)

The suspect, 22-year-old Daniel Khalil Clary, of Effort, faces charges that include attempted murder of a law enforcement officer and aggravated assault. Clary, who was shot and remains hospitalized, has given a statement to police.

"He's not denying his involvement," said Lt. Joseph F. Sokolofski.

Kelly was helping another trooper arrest Clary, whom they suspected of driving under the influence of marijuana, when Clary began fighting with the troopers, police said. The struggle lasted nearly two minutes, and at one point all three men were "wrestling and rolling around" the right lane of busy Route 33, in Plainfield Township, north of Philadelphia, as cars and trucks whizzed by them on the left, D'Ambrosio said.

Categories: EMS

In Baltimore, Combined Police/EMT Response Tactics Get Medical Care to Patients Quickly

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 10:02

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — From a small Texas church to Las Vegas to Harford County, recent mass shootings have horrified people across America, and their growing frequency is changing the way police and paramedics respond together.

Categories: EMS

Crestline Awarded $23.7 Million Contract For BCEHS Ambulances

JEMS - News - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 23:00
NSaskatoon, SK, Canada – Crestline Coach, a global leader in ambulance and specialty vehicle manufacturing, has secured a multi-year deal with BC Emergency Health Services (BCEHS). Manufacturing is currently underway at Crestline’s production headquarters, situated in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, with delivery scheduled to begin early 2018.
BCEHS is a long-standing customer of Crestline Coach, purchasing over 750 ambulances and specialty vehicles since 1995. Crestline and BCEHS worked closely to develop two prototypes to meet BCEHS’s urban and rural fleet needs. The prototypes are similar in design to BCEHS’s existing fleet; however, the new models incorporate several unique and distinct features that will enhance paramedic and patient safety, along with ergonomics and fleet efficiency. Examples of the enhancements include, but are not limited, to:

Safety: Crestline’s roll-cage body construction will greatly improve paramedic and patient safety. The strength of the Crestline aerodynamic modular body is without equal in the ambulance industry. Based on Crestline’s exclusive “roll bar” technology, the modular body has superior crash worthiness in “all axis” directions. In the event of a major accident, the roll over protective structure provides BCEHS’s paramedics and patients with the utmost protection.

A new style of emergency lighting will be adopted for the purpose of increasing off axis visibility of the ambulance while travelling to the scene of an accident or transporting a patient to the hospital.

Ergonomics: Through human factors testing and feedback from BCEHS, modifications to the interior body will enhance the ergonomic environment for paramedics, specifically improving access to critical equipment and providing larger storage volume for vital supplies.

“Green” element: Through a trial run, select ambulances will be outfitted with solar panels to measure the impact on the fleet’s efficiency. The solar panels will capture energy from the sun, directly converting abundant energy into electrical energy. This newfound energy assists in powering lifesaving equipment onboard, as well as the conversion batteries, which will result in less maintenance and help improve fuel economy.
Categories: EMS

TeamEMS: Enriching Lives of Emergency Medical Professionals

JEMS - News - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 23:00
Steamboat Springs, CO: On any given day, at any given time, a life-changing traumatic event can inflict pain and suffering. Auto accidents, violent crimes, recreational mishaps, intoxicated negligence, and more can lead to death or long term disability. These events have the potential to permanently transform lives, often in painful and negative ways. At any given moment, professionals in every corner of our country are prepared and ready to respond to these victims. Every time an incident occurs, a large and vast pool of professionals jump into action without hesitation or question. Their titles and licenses are of no consequence: They work together. While families cope with the aftermath of these situations, the selfless individuals who feverishly worked to improve the outcome will restock, refuel and re-set for the next patient.

All too often, the impact of these events on those who served goes unspoken and unrecognized. There are too many roles, too many titles and too many components of a response system to truly grasp the number of lives that can be touched by just a single incident. In all of their capacities, each person who directly (or indirectly) contributes to an incident becomes emotionally and physically invested. And, like all investments, there is a cost. Many times the demands of the shift dictate the need for that cost to go unnoticed, unacknowledged and unaddressed. That cost is emotional well-being.

teamEMS is an organization dedicated to off-setting that cost. At teamEMS, we have personally experienced being “in the trenches” as members of that response team. Having paid the emotional toll, we seek to enrich lives within our community of peers. The mission: teamEMS exists to promote and encourage health and wellness in the EMS community by empowering people through outreach, education and competition. Team Captain Robert Conner say’s “We are here to acknowledge the stress and trauma that professionals experience, make it okay to talk about it, and provide outlets for a healthy lifestyle.” As a small group of friends for the past several years, teamEMS is proud to announce our new mission statement and strategy to achieve that goal. “We are so excited to see how the tremendous amount of sponsor support in 2017 will launch us into the coming years.” continued Robert.
Categories: EMS

Loudon County, Tenn. Teacher Recognized with Lifesaving Award for Successfully Performing Heimlich Maneuver on Choking Student

JEMS - News - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 22:12

Earlier this month, Eaton Elementary first grade teacher Melinda Moroz saved the life of her student, Colby Arwood when he choked on a piece of candy during a math test. Immediately, she remembered medical training provided by Priority Ambulance that allowed her to perform the Heimlich maneuver four times before successfully dislodging the candy.

Because of these efforts, Moroz was honored with a Lifesaving Award at a ceremony at Eaton Elementary School on November 1. The award was presented by Loudon County Mayor Buddy Bradshaw, Loudon County Board of Education Director Jason Vance, Eaton Elementary School Principal Ashley Talley and Priority Ambulance Loudon County EMS Director Travis Estes and Supervisor Tony Lowery.

“I am very humbled, and I did what anyone else in this building would’ve done,” Moroz said. “At Loudon County Schools, we are here for the whole child. Academics are important, but our top priority is to keep our babies safe.”

Priority Ambulance provides annual training sessions on first aid, CPR, the Heimlich maneuver, bleeding control and other necessary medical skills to every school in the Loudon County and Lenoir City school system.  Priority Ambulance has provided this training since becoming the emergency 9-1-1 ambulance service provider in 2015. Moroz credits this training for her actions to save Colby.

“We receive a lot of training to act quickly in emergencies,” said Moroz.  “Tony Lowery of Priority Ambulance does a fantastic job of keeping us current with lifesaving skills so that my response to Colby’s situation was second nature.”

“Our kids go to these schools, so we want to make sure that when they go to school, they are safe,” said Priority Ambulance Supervisor Tony Lowery. “This training is so important, and we don’t always get to directly see the positive impact of our efforts. Through quick action and bravery, Melinda was able to save a life, and we are incredibly proud to present her with this award.”

Categories: EMS

2 Men in a Truck Chase down Texas Church Shooter

JEMS - News - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 09:53

SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas (AP) — A former National Rifle Association instructor who grabbed his rifle and ran barefoot across the street to open fire on the gunman who slaughtered 26 people at a small-town Texas church was hailed as a hero Monday, along with the pickup truck driver who helped chase the killer down.

Stephen Willeford, 55, said he was at his Sutherland Springs home Sunday when his daughter alerted him that she'd heard gunfire at the First Baptist Church nearby. Willeford said he immediately retrieved his rifle from his weapon safe.

"I kept hearing the shots, one after another, very rapid shots — just 'Pop! Pop! Pop! Pop!' — and I knew every one of those shots represented someone, that it was aimed at someone, that they weren't just random shots," Willeford said Monday during an interview with television stations KHBS/KHOG in Fort Smith and Fayetteville, Arkansas.

Willeford said he loaded his magazine and ran barefoot across the street to the church where he saw gunman Devin Patrick Kelley, 26, and exchanged gunfire.

"He saw me and I saw him," Willeford said. "I was standing behind a pickup truck for cover. I know I hit him. He got into his vehicle, and he fired another couple rounds through his side window. When the window dropped, I fired another round at him again."

As Kelley sped away, Willeford said he ran to a pickup truck stopped an intersection and told the driver, "That guy just shot up the Baptist church. We need to stop him."

The driver, Johnnie Langendorff, said he had been driving to Sutherland Springs on Sunday to pick up his girlfriend when a man who'd been exchanging gunfire with Kelley suddenly landed inside his truck.

"He jumped in my truck and said, 'He just shot up the church, we need to go get him.' And I said, 'Let's go,'" Langendorff, a 27-year-old Seguin resident, told The Associated Press on Monday, adding that the ensuing pursuit eventually clocked speeds upwards of 90 mph.

Categories: EMS

Pages

Subscribe to Volunteer Mobile Emergency Response Unit -- rehabsector.org aggregator - EMS