EMS

Inside EMS Podcast: How to deal with employees who don't get along

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Thu, 02/22/2018 - 15:25
Inside EMS Podcast: How to deal with employees who don't get along by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Do the right thing

EMScapades Cartoon - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 09:08
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

98 Killed in Syria Attack

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 05:58

BEIRUT (AP) — Intense Syrian government shelling and airstrikes of rebel-held Damascus suburbs killed at least 98 people in what was the deadliest day in the area in three years, a monitoring group and paramedics said Tuesday.

A day after Monday's government barrage, retaliatory shells rained down on the capital Damascus, killing at least one person on Tuesday.

The targeted suburbs — scattered across an area known as eastern Ghouta — have been subjected to weeks-long bombardment that has killed and wounded hundreds of people. Opposition activists say government forces have brought in more reinforcements in recent days, suggesting a major assault is imminent to recapture the area that is the last main rebel stronghold near Damascus.

Monday's bombardment that killed nearly 100 people saw the use of warplanes, helicopter gunships, missiles as well as artillery, in a major escalation of violence near President Bashar Assad's seat of power.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said it was the deadliest days in eastern Ghouta since 2015, adding that 20 children and 15 women were among those killed.

The opposition-affiliated Syrian Civil Defense, also known as White Helmets, said the shelling and airstrikes killed 98 and that some people are still under the rubble. It said the dead included one of the rescue group's members, Firas Jomaa.

Both the Observatory and the White Helmets reported more airstrikes and shelling on Tuesday in eastern Ghouta as rebels pounded Damascus with mortar shells.

Rebels retaliated by hitting some Damascus neighborhoods with mortar shells, killing one person and wounding six people, according to the state news agency SANA. On Tuesday morning, Damascus residents reported shelling on areas in central Damascus.

"Shells are falling like rain. We are hiding in the corridor," a Damascus resident told The Associated Press, asking that her name not be mentioned for her own safety. She spoke while hiding in the corridor of an office building.

Categories: EMS

17 Killed in Garbage Dump Collapse in Mozambique

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 05:47

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Heavy rains triggered the partial collapse of a huge mound of garbage in Mozambique's capital on Monday, killing 17 people who were buried by debris.

Authorities believe more bodies could be buried at the Hulene garbage dump on the outskirts of Maputo, and a search was underway. The garbage in the poor, densely populated area where the disaster happened rose to the height of a three-story building, according to the Portuguese news agency Lusa.

Lusa and Radio Mocambique both reported 17 deaths. Half a dozen homes were destroyed and some residents in the area fled for fear of another collapse.

"The mountains of garbage collapsed on the houses and many families were still inside these residences," Fatima Belchior, a national disaster official, told Lusa. Authorities are trying to help people who lost their homes, she said.

The Hulene garbage dump is the largest such facility in Maputo. People often comb through the garbage, searching for food and items to sell.

Health workers have long raised concerns about the impact of the fumes, flies and other hazards of the dump on the surrounding community. Municipal officials have previously discussed the closure of the dump.

___

This story corrects the spelling of name in paragraph 4 to Belchior.

Categories: EMS

Inside EMS Podcast: How to break bad habits in EMS

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Thu, 02/15/2018 - 15:33
Inside EMS Podcast: How to break bad habits in EMS by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Inside EMS Podcast: How to break bad habits in EMS

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Thu, 02/15/2018 - 15:31
Inside EMS Podcast: How to break bad habits in EMS by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Fatal Shooting at Florida High School

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 02/14/2018 - 18:02

Categories: EMS

Gunman Kills at Least 17 in Florida High School Shooting

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 02/14/2018 - 17:48

 

PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — A former student opened fire at a Florida high school Wednesday as classes were being dismissed, killing at least 17 people and sending scores of students running into the streets to escape the bullets.

 

Frantic parents rushed to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where SWAT team members and ambulances had surrounded the campus. Live footage showed emergency workers who appeared to be treating the wounded on sidewalks.

"It is a horrific situation," Superintendent Robert Runcie said. "It is a horrible day for us."

The 19-year-old suspect was taken into custody without incident about an hour after he left the school, authorities said.

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said the suspect, who was previously expelled for disciplinary reasons, had at least one rifle and multiple magazines.

Most of the fatalities were inside the building, though some were found fatally shot outside, the sheriff said.

The gunman was identified as Nicolas Cruz by a U.S. official briefed on the investigation. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the information publicly.

The day started normally at the school, which had a morning fire drill, and students were in class around 2:30 p.m. when another alarm sounded.

Noah Parness, a 17-year-old junior, said he and the other students calmly went outside to their fire-drill areas when he suddenly heard popping sounds.

"We saw a bunch of teachers running down the stairway, and then everybody shifted and broke into a sprint," Parness said. "I hopped a fence."

Categories: EMS

Shooting at Florida High School; Numerous Fatalities Reported

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 02/14/2018 - 14:40

PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on a shooting at a Florida high school (all times local):

4:25 p.m.

A school official says there are numerous fatalities from the high school shooting in South Florida.

Broward County Superintendent Robert Runcie says "There are numerous fatalities. It is a horrific situation." He added, "It is a horrible day for us."

The Broward County Sheriff's Office tweeted Wednesday afternoon that "so far we have at least 14 victims." The tweet added: "Victims have been and continue to be transported to Broward Health Medical Center and Broward Health North hospital."

The sheriff's statement didn't elaborate on the victims or their injuries.

___

4:15 p.m.

The White House has canceled its daily press briefing after a Florida high school shooting that sent students rushing into the streets.

President Donald Trump has spoken with Florida Gov. Rick Scott about the shooting. He says in a tweet that the White House is "working closely with law enforcement on the terrible Florida school shooting."

He earlier tweeted his condolences to the families of the victims.

Spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Trump has offered Florida federal assistance, if needed. The homeland security secretary has also been in touch with state and local officials.

Sanders says, "We continue to keep the victims, and their friends and family, in our thoughts and prayers."

___

4:10 p.m.

Authorities say the shooter at a South Florida high school is now in custody.

The Broward County Sheriff's Office gave no details in briefly tweeting that development. It did not identify the shooting suspect nor say how the person was taken into custody.

Television footage showed police putting a person in the back of a police car outside the high school.

___

4 p.m.

Parent John Obin says his son, a freshman at the South Florida high school where the shooting erupted, says his child was in class when he heard several shots. The father says his son advised that teachers quickly rushed students out of the school. He adds the boy told his father that he walked by two people on the ground motionless — and apparently dead — as students rushed outside.

Categories: EMS

Toddler Dies after Ambulance is Hit by Drunk Driver

JEMS - News - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 12:01

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) — Police in North Carolina say the toddler who was badly hurt after an ambulance crash has died.

A news release from the Winston-Salem Police Department Monday night says it was informed at 6:05 p.m. Monday that the boy had died at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Authorities offered no additional details.

The boy was being taken to the hospital around 1 a.m. Sunday when a drunken driver hit the medical transport, causing it to roll over on its side, police said.

Gary Oakes of Wise, Virginia, said in a brief phone interview Monday that his 3-year-old grandson had been under medical care before the crash but didn't want to elaborate. Asked how the family was coping, Oakes said, "It's devastating."

The boy's mother, Lyndsay Ann Oakes of Wise, was on the ambulance with him and suffered minor injuries. Reached by phone, she declined to be interviewed.

It's not clear why the boy was being treated before the crash, but Police Lt. Rick Newnum has said the boy was in stable condition before the ambulance was hit. The boy's name hasn't been released.

The driver of the car that hit the ambulance, 27-year-old Jose Martin Duran Romero, originally faced charges including driving while intoxicated and driving without a license. There was no immediate words on additional charges against Romero.

It wasn't clear from jail records if he had an attorney, and no home listing for him could be found. Romero's passenger was charged with failure to render aid.

Newnum said Monday that the men tried to leave the scene on foot, but one was kept from leaving by a witness to the crash. The other man was soon apprehended by police.

Categories: EMS

Inside EMS Podcast: Acknowledging the #MeToo movement in public safety

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 11:44
Inside EMS Podcast: Acknowledging the #MeToo movement in public safety by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Helicopter Crash in Grand Canyon Leaves 3 Dead, 4 Injured

JEMS - News - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 18:29

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A helicopter crash that killed three British tourists and left four others critically injured happened on tribal land in the Grand Canyon where air tours are not as highly regulated as those inside the national park.

The group of friends was in Las Vegas to celebrate a birthday and took a helicopter sightseeing tour of the Grand Canyon on the Hualapai reservation, family and friends said. Killed were veterinary receptionist Becky Dobson, 27; her boyfriend Stuart Hill, a 30-year-old car salesman; and his brother, Jason Hill, a 32-year-old lawyer.

Unlike the national park, air tours on the Hualapai reservation are not subject to federal regulations that restrict routes, impose curfews and cap the amount of flights over the Grand Canyon each year. The Federal Aviation Administration granted the Hualapai Tribe an exemption nearly two decades ago after finding that the regulations would harm the tribe's economy where tourism is a major driver.

Most of the flights over the reservation originate from Las Vegas, and air tour operators aggressively market them. The pilots can fly between canyon walls and land at the bottom next to the Colorado River on the reservation, which isn't allowed at the park other than for emergency operations.

Landing pads sit upstream and downstream from where the copter owned by Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters crashed Saturday, constantly ferrying people on and off aircraft.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating what led to the crash in a remote area where rescuers had to fly in, hike to the site and use night-vision goggles to find their way around, Hualapai Nation police Chief Francis Bradley said. Windy conditions and the rugged terrain made it difficult to reach the wreckage.

The flight left Boulder City, Nevada, destined for Quartermaster Canyon near the west rim of the Grand Canyon, NTSB lead investigator Stephen Stein said. The air tour pilots there operate off a common frequency, talking to each other and explaining their direction, though it's not mandatory, he said.

Categories: EMS

New Report Sheds Light on Opioid Industry's Role in Epidemic

JEMS - News - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 05:39

WASHINGTON (AP) — Companies selling some of the most lucrative prescription painkillers funneled millions of dollars to advocacy groups that in turn promoted the medications' use, according to a report released Monday by a U.S. senator.

The investigation by Missouri's Sen. Claire McCaskill sheds light on the opioid industry's ability to shape public opinion and raises questions about its role in an overdose epidemic that has claimed hundreds of thousands of American lives. Representatives of some of the drugmakers named in the report said they did not set conditions on how the money was to be spent or force the groups to advocate for their painkillers.

The report from McCaskill, ranking Democrat on the Senate's homeland security committee, examines advocacy funding by the makers of the top five opioid painkillers by worldwide sales in 2015. Financial information the companies provided to Senate staff shows they spent more than $10 million between 2012 and 2017 to support 14 advocacy groups and affiliated doctors.

The report did not include some of the largest and most politically active manufacturers of the drugs.

The findings follow a similar investigation launched in 2012 by a bipartisan pair of senators. That effort eventually was shelved and no findings were ever released.

While the new report provides only a snapshot of company activities, experts said it gives insight into how industry-funded groups fueled demand for drugs such as OxyContin and Vicodin, addictive medications that generated billions in sales despite research showing they are largely ineffective for chronic pain.

"It looks pretty damning when these groups were pushing the message about how wonderful opioids are and they were being heavily funded, in the millions of dollars, by the manufacturers of those drugs," said Lewis Nelson, a Rutgers University doctor and opioid expert.

The findings could bolster hundreds of lawsuits that are aimed at holding opioid drugmakers responsible for helping fuel an epidemic blamed for the deaths of more than 340,000 Americans since 2000.

Categories: EMS

Flu Season, Still Worsening, Now as Bad as 2009 Swine Flu

JEMS - News - Fri, 02/09/2018 - 10:04

NEW YORK (AP) — The flu has further tightened its grip on the U.S. This season is now as bad as the swine flu epidemic nine years ago.

A government report out Friday shows 1 of every 13 visits to the doctor last week was for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That ties the highest level seen in the U.S. during the 2009 swine flu pandemic.

And it surpasses every winter flu season since 2003, when the government changed the way it measures flu.

This season started early and has been driven by a nasty type of flu that tends to put more people in the hospital and cause more deaths.

But its long-lasting intensity has surprised experts, who are still sorting out why it's been so bad.

 

Categories: EMS

Regulators Say Herbal Supplement Kratom Contains Opioids

JEMS - News - Thu, 02/08/2018 - 00:07

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health authorities say an herbal supplement promoted as an alternative pain remedy contains the same chemicals found in opioids, the addictive family of drugs at the center of a national addiction crisis.

The Food and Drug Administration analysis, published Tuesday, makes it more likely that the supplement, kratom, could be banned by the federal government.

The FDA also said it has identified 44 reports of death involving kratom since 2011, up from 36 reported in November.

Sold in various capsules and powders, kratom has gained popularity in the U.S. as a treatment for pain, anxiety and drug dependence. Proponents argue that the substance is safer than opioid painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin, which have contributed to an epidemic of drug abuse. More than 63,000 Americans died in 2016 from drug overdoses, mostly from opioids.

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb reiterated that there are no FDA-approved medical uses for kratom, which is derived from a plant native to Southeast Asia.

"Claiming that kratom is benign because it's 'just a plant' is shortsighted and dangerous," Gottlieb said in a statement. "It's an opioid. And it's an opioid that's associated with novel risks because of the variability in how it's being formulated, sold and used recreationally."

FDA scientists analyzed the 25 most common chemical compounds in kratom and concluded that they behave like those found in opioids including morphine.

Kratom remains legal under federal law. But FDA inspectors have been seizing and destroying shipments at international mail facilities for months.

The FDA has submitted its review to the Drug Enforcement Administration, which is considering whether to place kratom in the same category of illegal drugs as heroin and LSD. The agency was poised to take that step in the summer of 2016, but delayed a decision after a flood of public complaints, including a letter signed by 62 members of Congress and a protest at the White House by kratom supporters.

Categories: EMS

Earthquake in Taiwan

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 02/07/2018 - 23:40

Categories: EMS

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