EMS

Mass Shootings Aren't More Frequent, But They Are More Deadly, Data Suggests

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 16:23

ATLANTA (AP) — It can sometimes seem as though mass shootings are occurring more frequently. Researchers who have been studying such crimes for decades say they aren't, but they have been getting deadlier.

In the five years since a gunman killed 20 children and six adults at a Connecticut elementary school, the nation has seen a number of massacres topping the death toll from Newtown and previous mass shootings, many of them involving rifles similar to the one used in Sandy Hook.

But Americans wanting to know why deadlier mass shootings are happening will get few answers. Is it is the wide availability of firearms? Is it the much-maligned "assault weapon" with its military style? Is it a failing mental health system?

"We're kind of grabbing at straws at this point in terms of trying to understand why the severity of these incidents has increased," said Grant Duwe, a criminologist who has been studying mass killings since the 1990s.

The federal government does little research on the matter, because a measure dating to the 1990s had the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention retreat from firearms research. Instead, a handful of academics, like Duwe, have toiled sometimes for decades with limited funding trying to better understand why these shootings happen and how to prevent them.

While mass shootings happen with regularity, they still remain so rare that there isn't enough information to draw conclusions with any certainty.

The profile of mass shooters — loners, depressed individuals, people who rarely smile or those who take to the internet to rant about a perceived insult or gripe — is so broad and common that it's impossible to pinpoint who might turn that anger into violence.

"There are lots of people who are isolated, don't have lots of friends, who don't smile and write ugly things on the internet and blame others for their misfortunes and don't want to live anymore and talk about mass killers and maybe even admire them," said Northeastern University professor James Alan Fox, who began studying mass shootings in the 1980s and has written six books on the topic.

Categories: EMS

Mass Shootings Aren't More Frequent, But They Are More Deadly, Data Suggests

JEMS - News - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 16:23

ATLANTA (AP) — It can sometimes seem as though mass shootings are occurring more frequently. Researchers who have been studying such crimes for decades say they aren't, but they have been getting deadlier.

In the five years since a gunman killed 20 children and six adults at a Connecticut elementary school, the nation has seen a number of massacres topping the death toll from Newtown and previous mass shootings, many of them involving rifles similar to the one used in Sandy Hook.

But Americans wanting to know why deadlier mass shootings are happening will get few answers. Is it is the wide availability of firearms? Is it the much-maligned "assault weapon" with its military style? Is it a failing mental health system?

"We're kind of grabbing at straws at this point in terms of trying to understand why the severity of these incidents has increased," said Grant Duwe, a criminologist who has been studying mass killings since the 1990s.

The federal government does little research on the matter, because a measure dating to the 1990s had the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention retreat from firearms research. Instead, a handful of academics, like Duwe, have toiled sometimes for decades with limited funding trying to better understand why these shootings happen and how to prevent them.

While mass shootings happen with regularity, they still remain so rare that there isn't enough information to draw conclusions with any certainty.

The profile of mass shooters — loners, depressed individuals, people who rarely smile or those who take to the internet to rant about a perceived insult or gripe — is so broad and common that it's impossible to pinpoint who might turn that anger into violence.

"There are lots of people who are isolated, don't have lots of friends, who don't smile and write ugly things on the internet and blame others for their misfortunes and don't want to live anymore and talk about mass killers and maybe even admire them," said Northeastern University professor James Alan Fox, who began studying mass shootings in the 1980s and has written six books on the topic.

Categories: EMS

Pipe Bomb Explodes in NYC Subway, 4 Injured

JEMS - News - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 09:37

NEW YORK (AP) — A man with a pipe bomb strapped to his body with Velcro and zip ties set off the crude device in the subway near Times Square on Monday, injuring him and three other people at the height of the morning rush hour.

All four were being treated for non-life-threatening injuries in what the mayor and police labeled an attempted terror attack.

The explosion happened in a long underground passageway that runs a full city block under 42nd Street between 7th and 8th Avenues. The 7:20 a.m. blast caused smoke to fill the passageway, which was crowded with Monday morning commuters.

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James P. O'Neill labeled it an attempted terror attack.

"Thank God the perpetrator did not achieve his ultimate goals," de Blasio said.

The suspect was identified as 27-year-old Akayed Ullah.

Law enforcement officials said he was inspired by the Islamic State group but had apparently not had any direct contact with the group. The officials said he lives in Brooklyn and may be of Bangladeshi descent. The officials spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the blast.

Authorities said the bomb was a low-tech explosive device. They were investigating how it was made, and combing through surveillance footage that captured the blast on video.

A video posted on social media showed the security footage. In it, a man walks through the crowded pedestrian tunnel and the bomb suddenly going off in a plume of white smoke. Through the smoke, the suspect is then seen sprawled on the ground as bystanders flee.

Categories: EMS

Pipe Bomb Explodes in NYC Subway, 4 Injured

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 09:37

NEW YORK (AP) — A man with a pipe bomb strapped to his body with Velcro and zip ties set off the crude device in the subway near Times Square on Monday, injuring him and three other people at the height of the morning rush hour.

All four were being treated for non-life-threatening injuries in what the mayor and police labeled an attempted terror attack.

The explosion happened in a long underground passageway that runs a full city block under 42nd Street between 7th and 8th Avenues. The 7:20 a.m. blast caused smoke to fill the passageway, which was crowded with Monday morning commuters.

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James P. O'Neill labeled it an attempted terror attack.

"Thank God the perpetrator did not achieve his ultimate goals," de Blasio said.

The suspect was identified as 27-year-old Akayed Ullah.

Law enforcement officials said he was inspired by the Islamic State group but had apparently not had any direct contact with the group. The officials said he lives in Brooklyn and may be of Bangladeshi descent. The officials spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the blast.

Authorities said the bomb was a low-tech explosive device. They were investigating how it was made, and combing through surveillance footage that captured the blast on video.

A video posted on social media showed the security footage. In it, a man walks through the crowded pedestrian tunnel and the bomb suddenly going off in a plume of white smoke. Through the smoke, the suspect is then seen sprawled on the ground as bystanders flee.

Categories: EMS

In Deadly New Mexico High School Shooting, Gunman Disguised Himself as a Student

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 13:15

AZTEC, N.M. (AP) — A 21-year-old gunman who disguised himself as a student to get into a New Mexico high school where he killed two students had caught the attention of U.S. investigators more than a year ago, authorities said Friday.

William Atchison, a former student at small-town Aztec High School, had legally purchased a handgun at a local store a month ago and planned the attack, authorities said. He left a message on a thumb drive found on his body that detailed his plan to wait until the students got off buses and made their way to class.

He walked into the school with them and went into a second-floor bathroom to "gear up." Atchison's plan was to shoot up a classroom and then kill himself.

"Work sucks, school sucks, life sucks. I just want out of this (expletive)," he wrote.

More lives could have been lost had Francisco I. Fernandez not walked into the bathroom, authorities said. That's when the gunman shot Fernandez. Atchison walked out into the hallway and encountered the second victim, Casey J. Marquez, and killed her.

The gunman then walked up and down the hall, firing randomly, before killing himself, authorities said.

"This is an act of cowardice," San Juan County Sheriff Ken Christesen said.

Authorities said the shooter did not have a criminal record, much less a traffic ticket. The only contact with law enforcement was what they described as a generic message on an online gaming forum in 2016 in which he talked about what weapons might be used in a mass shooting.

The FBI said the posting was flagged and investigators talked with the gunman at his home in Aztec, where he lives with his parents. At the time, he did not own any weapons other than an airsoft pellet gun and said he had no plans for an attack and just liked to troll sites online.

Categories: EMS

In Deadly New Mexico High School Shooting, Gunman Disguised Himself as a Student

JEMS - News - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 13:15

AZTEC, N.M. (AP) — A 21-year-old gunman who disguised himself as a student to get into a New Mexico high school where he killed two students had caught the attention of U.S. investigators more than a year ago, authorities said Friday.

William Atchison, a former student at small-town Aztec High School, had legally purchased a handgun at a local store a month ago and planned the attack, authorities said. He left a message on a thumb drive found on his body that detailed his plan to wait until the students got off buses and made their way to class.

He walked into the school with them and went into a second-floor bathroom to "gear up." Atchison's plan was to shoot up a classroom and then kill himself.

"Work sucks, school sucks, life sucks. I just want out of this (expletive)," he wrote.

More lives could have been lost had Francisco I. Fernandez not walked into the bathroom, authorities said. That's when the gunman shot Fernandez. Atchison walked out into the hallway and encountered the second victim, Casey J. Marquez, and killed her.

The gunman then walked up and down the hall, firing randomly, before killing himself, authorities said.

"This is an act of cowardice," San Juan County Sheriff Ken Christesen said.

Authorities said the shooter did not have a criminal record, much less a traffic ticket. The only contact with law enforcement was what they described as a generic message on an online gaming forum in 2016 in which he talked about what weapons might be used in a mass shooting.

The FBI said the posting was flagged and investigators talked with the gunman at his home in Aztec, where he lives with his parents. At the time, he did not own any weapons other than an airsoft pellet gun and said he had no plans for an attack and just liked to troll sites online.

Categories: EMS

Flames Engulf Semi-Rural San Diego Area

JEMS - News - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 10:12

FALLBROOK, Calif. (AP) — Retirement communities built on golf courses, thoroughbreds in race horse stables and other usually serene sites were engulfed by flames as the San Diego area became the latest front in California's wildfire fight.

The fire broke out Thursday amid dry, hot, windy conditions across the region that would be extreme for any season, but are especially stunning just two weeks from winter.

It exceeded 6 square miles (16 square kilometers) in a matter of hours and burned dozens of houses as it tore through the tightly packed Rancho Monserate Country Club community in the small city of Fallbrook, known for its avocado orchards and horse ranches. Three people were burned while escaping the flames, said Capt. Nick Schuler of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Winds subsided significantly early Friday morning, but forecasters said they would return later in the day. The resurgence was expected to be less widespread than on Thursday.

The fire was on the eastern border of the Marine Corps' vast Camp Pendleton, where base Fire Chief Thomas Thompson told Fox5 San Diego that the lack of wind should help the firefight. Marine and Navy aircraft will join the battle, he said.

Meanwhile, firefighters in Ventura — 130 miles (209 kilometers) to the north — tried to corral the largest and most destructive fire in the state, which has destroyed 430 buildings. The so-called Thomas Fire has grown to 180 square miles (466 square kilometers) since it broke out Monday. Fire crews made enough progress against large fires around Los Angeles to lift most evacuation orders.

The fire 50 miles (80 kilometers) north of San Diego, driven by winds above 35 mph (56 kph), razed rows of trailer homes in the retirement community, leaving charred and mangled metal in its wake.

It wasn't immediately known what sparked the fire next to State Highway 76, but strong winds carried it across six lanes to the other side.

Categories: EMS

Flames Engulf Semi-Rural San Diego Area

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 10:12

FALLBROOK, Calif. (AP) — Retirement communities built on golf courses, thoroughbreds in race horse stables and other usually serene sites were engulfed by flames as the San Diego area became the latest front in California's wildfire fight.

The fire broke out Thursday amid dry, hot, windy conditions across the region that would be extreme for any season, but are especially stunning just two weeks from winter.

It exceeded 6 square miles (16 square kilometers) in a matter of hours and burned dozens of houses as it tore through the tightly packed Rancho Monserate Country Club community in the small city of Fallbrook, known for its avocado orchards and horse ranches. Three people were burned while escaping the flames, said Capt. Nick Schuler of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Winds subsided significantly early Friday morning, but forecasters said they would return later in the day. The resurgence was expected to be less widespread than on Thursday.

The fire was on the eastern border of the Marine Corps' vast Camp Pendleton, where base Fire Chief Thomas Thompson told Fox5 San Diego that the lack of wind should help the firefight. Marine and Navy aircraft will join the battle, he said.

Meanwhile, firefighters in Ventura — 130 miles (209 kilometers) to the north — tried to corral the largest and most destructive fire in the state, which has destroyed 430 buildings. The so-called Thomas Fire has grown to 180 square miles (466 square kilometers) since it broke out Monday. Fire crews made enough progress against large fires around Los Angeles to lift most evacuation orders.

The fire 50 miles (80 kilometers) north of San Diego, driven by winds above 35 mph (56 kph), razed rows of trailer homes in the retirement community, leaving charred and mangled metal in its wake.

It wasn't immediately known what sparked the fire next to State Highway 76, but strong winds carried it across six lanes to the other side.

Categories: EMS

Inside EMS Podcast: The difference between in-hospital and out-of-hospital DNR's

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 13:23
Inside EMS Podcast: The difference between in-hospital and out-of-hospital DNR's by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

San Diego Contends with Homelessness, Hepatitis Outbreak

JEMS - News - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 10:18

SAN DIEGO (AP) — For Christine Wade, the tent she shared with six children, pitched in an asphalt parking lot, was far better than their previous home — a shelter where rats ate through the family's bags of clothes.

"It's peaceful here," Wade, 31 and eight months pregnant, said in an October interview at the campground.

A tent, of course, is not a home. But for these San Diegans, it is a blessing.

Like other major cities all along the West Coast, San Diego is struggling with a homeless crisis. In a place that bills itself as "America's Finest City," spiraling real estate values have contributed to spiraling homelessness, leaving more than 3,200 people living on the streets or in their cars.

Most alarmingly, the deplorable sanitary conditions help spread a liver-damaging virus that lives in feces, contributing to the deadliest U.S. hepatitis A epidemic in 20 years.

"Some of the most vulnerable are dying in the streets in one of the most desirable and livable regions in America," a San Diego County grand jury wrote in its report in June  — reiterating recommendations it gave the city over the past decade to address homelessness.

San Diego has struggled to do that. Two years ago, Mayor Kevin Faulconer closed a downtown tent shelter that operated for 29 years during winter months. He promised a "game changer" — a new, permanent facility with services to funnel people to housing.

But it wasn't enough.

The result? Legions of Californians without shelter. A spreading contagion. And an extraordinary challenge to the city's sunny identity that threatens its key tourism industry.

For now, San Diego again is turning to tents. The campground where the Wades lived served 200 residents but was only temporary; this month, officials are opening three industrial-sized tents that will house a total of 700 people.

There are plans afoot to build housing. But to deal with the immediate emergency, the city had to take $6.5 million that had been budgeted for permanent homes to operate the giant tents.

Categories: EMS

Southern California Fires

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 10:07

Categories: EMS

Fires Rage in Southern California, Major Freeway Closes

JEMS - News - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 09:58

VENTURA, Calif. (AP) — Authorities closed a major freeway Thursday as flames from the largest and most destructive Southern California wildfire jumped lanes and churned toward coastal and mountain communities northwest of Los Angeles as crews kept an eye on unpredictable winds.

A more favorable wind forecast still called for potentially dangerous gusts, but ones not likely to approach historic levels forecasters had feared, according to the National Weather Service.

"This is good news for the fire crews as the winds will not be driven quite as vigorously," a weather service statement said.

Calmer overnight conditions helped crews protect the Ventura County resort town of Ojai (OH'hi), where most of the 7,000 residents were under new evacuation orders following a big burst of wind late Wednesday. Evacuations were also ordered for the first time in Santa Barbara County, where the coastal city of Carpinteria was under threat.

Officials closed U.S. 101 for more than a dozen miles along the coast, cutting off a major route between Ventura and Santa Barbara counties for several hours as fire charred heavy brush along lanes.

Southern California has been hit hard by four major fires that have put tens of thousands of people under evacuation orders and destroyed nearly 200 homes and buildings, a figure that is almost certain to grow.

Millions of cellphones buzzed loudly Wednesday night from San Diego to Santa Barbara with a sound that usually means an Amber Alert, but this time meant a rare weather warning for strong winds making extreme fire danger.

Officials hope the electronic push will keep the region alert and the death toll from the week's fires at zero.

Melissa Rosenzweig, 47, was briefly back home Wednesday after evacuating from her Ventura house, which has been spared so far while most on her street had burned in the largest and most destructive of the region's fires. She and her husband were about to evacuate again, hoping they will get lucky twice as the new winds arrive.

Categories: EMS

Fires Rage in Southern California, Major Freeway Closes

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 09:58

VENTURA, Calif. (AP) — Authorities closed a major freeway Thursday as flames from the largest and most destructive Southern California wildfire jumped lanes and churned toward coastal and mountain communities northwest of Los Angeles as crews kept an eye on unpredictable winds.

A more favorable wind forecast still called for potentially dangerous gusts, but ones not likely to approach historic levels forecasters had feared, according to the National Weather Service.

"This is good news for the fire crews as the winds will not be driven quite as vigorously," a weather service statement said.

Calmer overnight conditions helped crews protect the Ventura County resort town of Ojai (OH'hi), where most of the 7,000 residents were under new evacuation orders following a big burst of wind late Wednesday. Evacuations were also ordered for the first time in Santa Barbara County, where the coastal city of Carpinteria was under threat.

Officials closed U.S. 101 for more than a dozen miles along the coast, cutting off a major route between Ventura and Santa Barbara counties for several hours as fire charred heavy brush along lanes.

Southern California has been hit hard by four major fires that have put tens of thousands of people under evacuation orders and destroyed nearly 200 homes and buildings, a figure that is almost certain to grow.

Millions of cellphones buzzed loudly Wednesday night from San Diego to Santa Barbara with a sound that usually means an Amber Alert, but this time meant a rare weather warning for strong winds making extreme fire danger.

Officials hope the electronic push will keep the region alert and the death toll from the week's fires at zero.

Melissa Rosenzweig, 47, was briefly back home Wednesday after evacuating from her Ventura house, which has been spared so far while most on her street had burned in the largest and most destructive of the region's fires. She and her husband were about to evacuate again, hoping they will get lucky twice as the new winds arrive.

Categories: EMS

Calif. Lawmakers Review Failures of Emergency Warning Systems in October Wildfires

JEMS - News - Tue, 12/05/2017 - 10:19

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The failure of cellphone and other privately owned systems crippled emergency-warning efforts during California's deadly October wildfires, and the state lacks authority to order those companies to strengthen their systems against disasters, the state's top emergency manager said Monday.

Mark Ghilarducci, director of the state Office of Emergency Services, was among several who testified at a legislative hearing investigating the failures of emergency-warning systems during the recent Northern California fires.

The fires killed 44 people and destroyed nearly 9,000 homes and other structures. Ghilarducci called it the largest loss of homes in any California disaster since the 1906 quake in San Francisco.

The fires spread at night as many victims slept, knocking out cellphones, land lines, internet and cable television in some areas as cell towers and other equipment burned, hampering alert services that relied on texts, social media and broadcast.

Lawmakers described neighbors, police and firefighters knocking on doors and honking car horns to waken and warn residents.

"We know that particularly the elderly and the vulnerable lacked those important minutes to evacuate," said Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, a Democrat from Santa Barbara.

One problem is that most emergency alert systems operate on privately owned phone and other communications systems, Ghilarducci said. Financial concerns may keep those companies from expanding and strengthening their networks to withstand disasters, he and lawmakers said.

"The government does not really have authority over that to ensure that that redundancy and resiliency is put in place," Ghilarducci said.

Burned cellphone towers crippled one system increasingly used by public-safety agencies: Nixle, which requires users to sign up to get text alerts, said Sen. Mike McGuire, a Healdsburg Democrat.

McGuire said two things would have made a big difference in Napa County, which was among those hit hardest by the fires.

Categories: EMS

Calif. Lawmakers Review Failures of Emergency Warning Systems in October Wildfires

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 12/05/2017 - 10:19

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The failure of cellphone and other privately owned systems crippled emergency-warning efforts during California's deadly October wildfires, and the state lacks authority to order those companies to strengthen their systems against disasters, the state's top emergency manager said Monday.

Mark Ghilarducci, director of the state Office of Emergency Services, was among several who testified at a legislative hearing investigating the failures of emergency-warning systems during the recent Northern California fires.

The fires killed 44 people and destroyed nearly 9,000 homes and other structures. Ghilarducci called it the largest loss of homes in any California disaster since the 1906 quake in San Francisco.

The fires spread at night as many victims slept, knocking out cellphones, land lines, internet and cable television in some areas as cell towers and other equipment burned, hampering alert services that relied on texts, social media and broadcast.

Lawmakers described neighbors, police and firefighters knocking on doors and honking car horns to waken and warn residents.

"We know that particularly the elderly and the vulnerable lacked those important minutes to evacuate," said Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, a Democrat from Santa Barbara.

One problem is that most emergency alert systems operate on privately owned phone and other communications systems, Ghilarducci said. Financial concerns may keep those companies from expanding and strengthening their networks to withstand disasters, he and lawmakers said.

"The government does not really have authority over that to ensure that that redundancy and resiliency is put in place," Ghilarducci said.

Burned cellphone towers crippled one system increasingly used by public-safety agencies: Nixle, which requires users to sign up to get text alerts, said Sen. Mike McGuire, a Healdsburg Democrat.

McGuire said two things would have made a big difference in Napa County, which was among those hit hardest by the fires.

Categories: EMS

Fires in Southern California Force Thousands to Evacuate

JEMS - News - Tue, 12/05/2017 - 10:12

SANTA PAULA, Calif. (AP) — Ferocious Santa Ana winds raking Southern California whipped explosive wildfires Tuesday, prompting evacuation orders for thousands of homes.

The biggest blaze broke out Monday in Ventura County and grew wildly to more than 48 square miles (124 sq. kilometers) in the hours that followed, sheriff's Sgt. Eric Buschow said.

Another fire erupted on the north edge of Los Angeles, threatening the Sylmar and Lakeview Terrace neighborhoods, where residents scrambled to get out.

At least 150 structures had burned so far in Ventura County, officials said. Officials did not immediately say what type of buildings burned, but TV reports showed homes in flames as well as Vista del Mar Hospital, a facility that treats patients with mental problems, chemical dependency and veterans with post-traumatic stress syndrome.

More than 27,000 people have been evacuated and one firefighter was injured in Ventura County. There was no word on the extent of the injuries. After initial reports of a fatality, county fire Capt. Steve Kaufmann said a dead dog but no person was found in an overturned car.

The winds were pushing the fire toward Santa Paula, a city of some 30,000 people about 60 miles (97 kilometers) northwest of Los Angeles. Many of the evacuated homes were in that city.

However, evacuation orders were expanded to houses in Ventura, which is 12 miles (19 kilometers) southwest and has 106,000 residents.

"The prospects for containment are not good," Ventura County Fire Chief Mark Lorenzen said before dawn. "Really, Mother Nature is going to decide."

Thomas Aquinas College, a school with about 350 students, has also been evacuated, with students going to their own homes or to those of faculty and staff, the college said in a statement.

The fires were being driven by Southern California's notorious gusty and dry Santa Ana winds, which have been linked to some of the region's worst wildfires.

Categories: EMS

Fires in Southern California Force Thousands to Evacuate

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 12/05/2017 - 10:12

SANTA PAULA, Calif. (AP) — Ferocious Santa Ana winds raking Southern California whipped explosive wildfires Tuesday, prompting evacuation orders for thousands of homes.

The biggest blaze broke out Monday in Ventura County and grew wildly to more than 48 square miles (124 sq. kilometers) in the hours that followed, sheriff's Sgt. Eric Buschow said.

Another fire erupted on the north edge of Los Angeles, threatening the Sylmar and Lakeview Terrace neighborhoods, where residents scrambled to get out.

At least 150 structures had burned so far in Ventura County, officials said. Officials did not immediately say what type of buildings burned, but TV reports showed homes in flames as well as Vista del Mar Hospital, a facility that treats patients with mental problems, chemical dependency and veterans with post-traumatic stress syndrome.

More than 27,000 people have been evacuated and one firefighter was injured in Ventura County. There was no word on the extent of the injuries. After initial reports of a fatality, county fire Capt. Steve Kaufmann said a dead dog but no person was found in an overturned car.

The winds were pushing the fire toward Santa Paula, a city of some 30,000 people about 60 miles (97 kilometers) northwest of Los Angeles. Many of the evacuated homes were in that city.

However, evacuation orders were expanded to houses in Ventura, which is 12 miles (19 kilometers) southwest and has 106,000 residents.

"The prospects for containment are not good," Ventura County Fire Chief Mark Lorenzen said before dawn. "Really, Mother Nature is going to decide."

Thomas Aquinas College, a school with about 350 students, has also been evacuated, with students going to their own homes or to those of faculty and staff, the college said in a statement.

The fires were being driven by Southern California's notorious gusty and dry Santa Ana winds, which have been linked to some of the region's worst wildfires.

Categories: EMS

S.C. State Basketball Player Collapses in Cardiac Arrest, Wake County EMS on Scene

JEMS - News - Mon, 12/04/2017 - 10:19

Paramedics Greg Rodevick and Rich Eldridge got themselves and their equipment in place at Raleigh’s PNC Arena on Saturday December 2, with a simple plan of having a Chick-Fil-A sandwich and standing by courtside for EMS coverage at the N.C. State Wolfpack men’s basketball game as they hosted the South Carolina State Bulldogs. 

Things changed quickly.  Not long into the game, they were called over for an N.C. State player with an apparent knee injury.  As they approached, determining if they would need to bring their stretcher over, they were interrupted by commotion over on the South Carolina State bench. 

They were quickly diverted from the knee injury to what was obviously a critical emergency. What may have appeared on the surface to be chaos at the bench was actually an outstanding example of what should happen anytime someone collapses and goes unresponsive.

South Carolina State Athletic Trainer Tyler Long was immediately down and providing hard, fast, uninterrupted chest compressions on this lifeless basketball player who had just stopped breathing. N.C. State keeps an AED at the bench, and S.C. State staff had grabbed it and were getting it applied.

Greg and Rich worked in and began leading care. A shock was delivered by the AED, but pulses weren't immediately detectable afterward, and compressions were continued.  Within a few moments, they were able to find a pulse as they switched over to the EMS heart monitor. 

Not long after, the young man was awake and talking with the crew and team.

 

Wake County EMS 18 had arrived, and care was transferred to Justin Miracle, John Porter, and Brandon Kaupa for transport to Rex Hospital.  They were assisted by District Chief Benji Currie.

Greg and Rich remained in place covering the game when it resumed.  But they were able to get to Rex and talk face-to-face with S.C. State player Ty Solomon just after the game. 

Categories: EMS

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