EMS

Nation's Largest Pharmacy Benefit Manager Puts Limits on Opioid Prescriptions

JEMS - News - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 14:47

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The nation's largest pharmacy benefit manager will soon limit the number and strength of opioid drugs prescribed to first-time users as part of a wide-ranging effort to curb an epidemic affecting millions of Americans.

But the new program from Express Scripts is drawing criticism from the American Medical Association, the largest association of physicians and medical students in the U.S., which believes treatment plans should be left to doctors and their patients.

About 12.5 million Americans misused prescription opioids in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More than 33,000 deaths that year were blamed on opioid overdoses.

Express Scripts launched a yearlong pilot program in 2016 aimed at reducing patients' dependency on opioids and the risk of addiction, said Snezana Mahon, the Missouri-based company's vice president of clinical product development.

Mahon said analysis of 106,000 patients in the pilot program showed a 38 percent reduction in hospitalizations and a 40 percent reduction in emergency room visits, compared to a control group. The program is scheduled to take effect nationwide on Sept. 1 for Express Scripts members whose employer or health insurer has enrolled to participate.

Under the program, new opioid users are limited to seven-day prescriptions, even if the doctor orders scripts for much longer. Mahon said the average prescription is for 22 days.

The program also requires short-acting drugs for first-time opioid prescriptions, even though many doctors prescribe long-acting opioids. Dosage is also limited, and the company will monitor and try to prevent for patterns of potential "pill shopping," where a patient goes from doctor to doctor to collect prescriptions.

Categories: EMS

Wisconsin Man Drives to ED After Accidentally Puncturing His Heart With a Nail

JEMS - News - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 08:36

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A Wisconsin man who doctors say came perilously close to death after accidentally shooting a nail into his heart while working on his house calmly drove himself to the hospital and even parked his pickup truck in the lot before walking into the emergency room.

Doug Bergeson is ready to get back to work this week after surviving a June 25 ordeal that others might not have taken in such stride. Bergeson told The Associated Press he was working on framing in a fireplace at his house near Peshtigo in northeast Wisconsin when his nail gun accidentally fired, sending a nail ricocheting off some wood and into his chest.

"I thought it just nicked me. I looked down. I couldn't see anything," Bergeson said in an interview Tuesday. "I felt OK. I wasn't worried about the injury. I couldn't feel any pressure or blood building up."

As he tugged at his sweatshirt, Bergeson, 52, said he realized only about 1 inch of the 3½-inch nail was sticking out of his chest.

"I could see the nail moving with my heartbeat. It was kind of twitching with every heartbeat," Bergeson said.

He was more annoyed than worried. He knew he had to go to the ER.

"I was frustrated because I knew I wasn't going to get home until late and I couldn't get anything done," Bergeson said, adding that "common sense" told him not to pull the nail out.

So he washed up, hopped in his truck and made his way to Bay Area Medical Center in Marinette, about 10 minutes away. After parking his truck and walking into the ER, Bergeson said he started to feel more pain and summoned a security guard for help.

"If you could find someone that would be great, I'm just going to sit down," he told the guard.

Still thinking he would soon be on his way home after a little medical attention, Bergeson texted his wife, Donna, to bring him a new shirt because medical staff had cut off the one he was wearing.

Categories: EMS

Where in the World of EMS are A.J. Heightman and Ryan Kelley?

JEMS - News - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 14:00

JEMS Editor-in-Chief, A.J. Heightman and Managing Editor Ryan Kelley are participating, along with 250 other members of the PennWell editorial and sales staff, in four days of intense, focused, educational strategic planning meetings at the River Spirit Casino Resort in Tulsa, Okla., the PennWell headquarters.

The objective is to plan and coordinate future programs, projects and offerings for you, our readers, to help you take EMS to the next level of staffing, safety, education and operations.

JEMS Sales representative Mike Shear, Managing Editor Ryan Kelley and Editor-in-Chief A.J. Heightman, prepare for four days of intense meetings at the Margarita lounge.

PennWell CEO Mark Wilmoth addresses the JEMS Editorial & Sales teams, along with other PennWell staff. 

PennWell Vice President Paul Andrews, a seasoned EMS and Fire media specialist, addresses the JEMS/EMS TODAY Conference team and other PennWell staff on the latest trends and oppotunities in print and digital media.

Categories: EMS

Tree Crashes on Crowd at Festival in Portugal, 13 Killed

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 13:36

LISBON, Portugal (AP) — A tree crashed down on a popular religious festival on the Portuguese island of Madeira on Tuesday, killing 12 people and injuring 52 others, officials said.

The tree fell while a large crowd was gathered near the island's capital of Funchal as part of the Nossa Senhora do Monte festival. It's Madeira's biggest annual festivity and was being held Monday and Tuesday, drawing large crowds to a church on Funchal's outskirts.

Local media reports said that the tree was an oak that was more than 200 years old.

Regional health chief Pedro Ramos said that seven people had serious injuries. Ramos said that of the 12 fatalities, 10 people died at the site of the accident. A child died en route to a local hospital, where another woman also perished.

RTP public television showed images of emergency workers gathered under a group of tall trees on the Atlantic island. Ambulances were shown pulling away from the site while workers wielding chain saws cut away limbs from an enormous tree on the ground.

More televised images showed some people attending to the injured. Others appeared visibly shaken.

Miguel Albuquerque, the head of the regional government of Madeira, declared three days of mourning for the victims.

Prime Minister Antonio Costa shared his condolences for the victims on his Twitter account.

"I express my condolences for the victims of the accident in Madeira," Costa said. "My thoughts are with the family and friends of the victims."

Costa said that the central government made contact with local authorities on the island to offer its support.

"The government has provided medical support given the high number of victims," he said.

Categories: EMS

Tree Crashes on Crowd at Festival in Portugal, 12 Killed

JEMS - News - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 13:36

LISBON, Portugal (AP) — A tree crashed down on a popular religious festival on the Portuguese island of Madeira on Tuesday, killing 12 people and injuring 52 others, officials said.

The tree fell while a large crowd was gathered near the island's capital of Funchal as part of the Nossa Senhora do Monte festival. It's Madeira's biggest annual festivity and was being held Monday and Tuesday, drawing large crowds to a church on Funchal's outskirts.

Local media reports said that the tree was an oak that was more than 200 years old.

Regional health chief Pedro Ramos said that seven people had serious injuries. Ramos said that of the 12 fatalities, 10 people died at the site of the accident. A child died en route to a local hospital, where another woman also perished.

RTP public television showed images of emergency workers gathered under a group of tall trees on the Atlantic island. Ambulances were shown pulling away from the site while workers wielding chain saws cut away limbs from an enormous tree on the ground.

More televised images showed some people attending to the injured. Others appeared visibly shaken.

Miguel Albuquerque, the head of the regional government of Madeira, declared three days of mourning for the victims.

Prime Minister Antonio Costa shared his condolences for the victims on his Twitter account.

"I express my condolences for the victims of the accident in Madeira," Costa said. "My thoughts are with the family and friends of the victims."

Costa said that the central government made contact with local authorities on the island to offer its support.

"The government has provided medical support given the high number of victims," he said.

Categories: EMS

Let them have their fun

EMScapades Cartoon - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 12:04

New comics every Tuesday and Friday!

Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

At Least 600 Missing in Deadly Sierra Leone Mudslides

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 09:43

REETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — The death toll from massive mudslides in Sierra Leone's capital was certain to rise Tuesday as bodies washed up on a beach and workers searched for an untold number of people buried in their homes. The Red Cross estimated that 600 people were still missing.

Authorities have said more than 300 people were killed in and around Freetown on Monday following heavy rains. Many were trapped under tons of mud as they slept.

The Connaught Hospital mortuary in central Freetown was overwhelmed on Tuesday with more than 300 bodies, many spread on the floor.

"The magnitude of the destruction as a result of the disaster is such that the number of victims in the community who may not come out alive may likely exceed the number of dead bodies already recovered," said Charles Mambu, a civil society activist and resident of one affected area, Mount Sugar Loaf.

In a sign of hope, he said, "two bodies were brought out alive from the debris last evening."

Government spokesman Cornelius Deveaux said rescue operations began early Tuesday to remove people still believed to be buried in the rubble. Heavy equipment was deployed to dig into the piles of red mud.

Deveaux said definitive death figures were unknown "as the mortuary is overwhelmed with corpses — men, women and children."

Many bodies were in a horrible state, missing arms, heads or legs, Deveaux said, adding that proper burials will be vital in keeping disease at bay. "Contingency plans are being put in place to mitigate the outbreak of disease like cholera," he told a local radio station, FM 98.1.

Sulaiman Parker, the environmental protection officer in the Freetown City Council, said bodies will be buried in the next 48 hours.

Categories: EMS

At Least 600 Missing in Deadly Sierra Leone Mudslides

JEMS - News - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 09:43

REETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — The death toll from massive mudslides in Sierra Leone's capital was certain to rise Tuesday as bodies washed up on a beach and workers searched for an untold number of people buried in their homes. The Red Cross estimated that 600 people were still missing.

Authorities have said more than 300 people were killed in and around Freetown on Monday following heavy rains. Many were trapped under tons of mud as they slept.

The Connaught Hospital mortuary in central Freetown was overwhelmed on Tuesday with more than 300 bodies, many spread on the floor.

"The magnitude of the destruction as a result of the disaster is such that the number of victims in the community who may not come out alive may likely exceed the number of dead bodies already recovered," said Charles Mambu, a civil society activist and resident of one affected area, Mount Sugar Loaf.

In a sign of hope, he said, "two bodies were brought out alive from the debris last evening."

Government spokesman Cornelius Deveaux said rescue operations began early Tuesday to remove people still believed to be buried in the rubble. Heavy equipment was deployed to dig into the piles of red mud.

Deveaux said definitive death figures were unknown "as the mortuary is overwhelmed with corpses — men, women and children."

Many bodies were in a horrible state, missing arms, heads or legs, Deveaux said, adding that proper burials will be vital in keeping disease at bay. "Contingency plans are being put in place to mitigate the outbreak of disease like cholera," he told a local radio station, FM 98.1.

Sulaiman Parker, the environmental protection officer in the Freetown City Council, said bodies will be buried in the next 48 hours.

Categories: EMS

Sierra Leone Mudslides

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 09:38

Categories: EMS

Data Shows Fewer Deaths from Lightning Strikes

JEMS - News - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 09:23

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lightning — once one of nature's biggest killers —is claiming far fewer lives in the United States, mostly because we've learned to get out of the way.

In the 1940s, when there were fewer people, lightning killed more than 300 people annually. So far this year, 13 people have died after being struck, on pace for a record low of 17 deaths. Taking the growing population into account, the lightning death rate has shrunk more than forty-fold since record-keeping began in 1940.

People seem to be capturing the phenomenon more on camera than before, making it seem like something new and sizzling is going on in the air.  Separate videos last month of a Florida lifeguard and an airport worker being hit by lightning went viral. Both survived.

Lightning strikes have not changed — they hit about the same amount as they used to, said Pennsylvania State University meteorology professor Paul Markowski.

A big difference: Fewer of us are outside during bad weather. If we're not huddled indoors, we're often in cars. Vehicles with metal roofs — not convertibles — are safe from lightning, experts say.

"As a society we spend less time outside," said Harold Brooks, a scientist at the National Weather Service's National Severe Storms Laboratory. "Especially farmers. There aren't just many farmers around."

Decades ago, farmers would be in fields and were the tallest object, making them most likely to get hit, said National Weather Service lightning safety specialist John Jensenius Jr.

That helps explain the drop in yearly lightning deaths from about 329 in the 1940s to about 98 in the 1970s. The numbers have kept plunging since. From 2007-2016, average yearly deaths dropped to 31.

Improved medical care also has played a key role, including wider use of defibrillators and more CPR-trained bystanders.

When Dr. Mary Ann Cooper started out in the emergency room in the 1970s, there was nothing in textbooks about how to treat lightning victims.

Categories: EMS

How Paramedics helped BlueCross BlueShield of New Mexico Reduce ED Usage, Readmissions

JEMS - News - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 18:40
The EMS profession has been suggesting Alternate Payment Models (APMs) for the services we provide for several years.  Many of us believe that the payment model used by most third party payers (Medicare, Medicaid, commercial insurers) provides what’s referred to as “perverse incentives," in essence forcing EMS to transport patients to an emergency department (ED) in order to be eligible for payment. 

A recent article outlines a new initiative in New Mexico and a shift in thinking from some third party payers:

 

Since the program’s full launch in 2016, BCBSNM estimates that it saved $1.7 million—after taking into account the cost of the program itself. Among the 1,100 participating members, there was a 62% reduction in ER utilization and a 63% reduction in ambulance usage.

In addition, the 30-day readmission rate among BCBSNM’s members has dropped from 15% to 11.2% since it began the paramedicine program. While the insurer has undertaken multiple initiatives to lower that percentage, “we’re confident that this program was a big part of that reduction,” Ross said.  Read more...

 

Finally, with initiatives such as this one in New Mexico, as well as payer arrangements agencies like MedStar in Ft. Worth; REMSA in Reno, NV; and Northwell Health’s Center for EMS in Syosset, NY; it appears third party payers are beginning to realize they can improve patient outcomes and experience of care, while at the same time reduce preventable healthcare expenditures by paying EMS to do something other than using the highest cost more of transport (an ambulance) to take the patient to the highest cost primary care resource (an ED).

Categories: EMS

More than 200 Dead in Sierra Leone Mudslides

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 10:19

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Relatives dug through the mud in search of their loved ones and a morgue overflowed with bodies Monday after heavy rains and flooding early in the day killed at least 200 people in Sierra Leone's capital.

Bodies were spread out on the floor of a morgue, Sinneh Kamara, a coroner technician at the Connaught Hospital mortuary, told the national broadcaster.

"The capacity at the mortuary is too small for the corpses," he told the Sierra Leone National Broadcasting Corp.

Kamara urged the health department to deploy more ambulances, saying his mortuary only has four.

Sierra Leone's national television broadcaster interrupted its regular programming to show scenes of people trying to retrieve their loved ones' bodies. Others were seen carting relatives' remains in rice sacks to the morgue.

Military personnel have been deployed to help in the rescue operation currently ongoing, officials said.

Many of the impoverished areas of Sierra Leone's capital are close to sea level and have poor drainage systems, exacerbating flooding during the West African country's rainy season.

Categories: EMS

More than 200 Dead in Sierra Leone Mudslides

JEMS - News - Mon, 08/14/2017 - 10:19

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Relatives dug through the mud in search of their loved ones and a morgue overflowed with bodies Monday after heavy rains and flooding early in the day killed at least 200 people in Sierra Leone's capital.

Bodies were spread out on the floor of a morgue, Sinneh Kamara, a coroner technician at the Connaught Hospital mortuary, told the national broadcaster.

"The capacity at the mortuary is too small for the corpses," he told the Sierra Leone National Broadcasting Corp.

Kamara urged the health department to deploy more ambulances, saying his mortuary only has four.

Sierra Leone's national television broadcaster interrupted its regular programming to show scenes of people trying to retrieve their loved ones' bodies. Others were seen carting relatives' remains in rice sacks to the morgue.

Military personnel have been deployed to help in the rescue operation currently ongoing, officials said.

Many of the impoverished areas of Sierra Leone's capital are close to sea level and have poor drainage systems, exacerbating flooding during the West African country's rainy season.

Categories: EMS

An Emergency Physician & Paramedic Recounts His Experience as a Motorcycle EMS Provider

JEMS - News - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 15:42

I began my service in EMS and Fire at the tender age of 16. That makes it more than 25 years now of responding to the tones. I’ve worked in myriad roles: volunteer first aid, EMT, paramedic, firefighter, beach lifeguard, air ops, boat ops and as an emergency physician on a fast motorcycle response unit (MRU) in Hungary—by far my favorite job.

Quick response motorcycles offer an efficient and highly effective platform for both EMS and fire departments whose present resources are stretched too thin due to increasing call volumes and stagnant budgets. More than half the countries on the planet utilize two-wheeled vehicles in some fashion to respond to emergencies. 

Hungary was the first country worldwide to mount emergency physicians on very well-equipped fast response motorcycles that quickly worked their valuable way to the top of a tiered EMS system. 

In addition to working on the MRU, I’m also the president and founder of the International Fire and EMS Motorcycle Response Unit Association (IMRUA), a trade organization working on improving the working environment of MRUs around the world and increasing awareness of this very effective, efficient form of EMS and fire response.

A Memorable Call

One of my most memorable experiences from my years of service in an MRU occurred August 2016 during my last shift of the season just outside of Budapest, Hungary. 

It was an uneventful and rather boring shift that was about to end when I was dispatched at the last minute to a cardiac arrest located over 12 miles away in gridlocked traffic. And as it goes, it was a poorly marked building with the patient on the second floor, all the way in the back of the building. I made it to the scene and took all my equipment up to find the crew of a BLS unit doing CPR. I made a quick assessment and attached my monitor. I delivered the first shock less than 10 minutes after my initial dispatch. 

Categories: EMS

Tomasz Roginski, Head of the Gdansk Motorcycle Response Unit, Discusses the Origins of Motorcycle EMS in Poland

JEMS - News - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 15:17

I became a paramedic in 2000 and one year later, I started working on an emergency ambulance (“R” class in Poland). My colleague Dr. Piotr Kołodziej and I often thought about how much more convenient it would be to use motorcycles to get to patients in a more timely manner. 

In 2002, Piotr made a friend at the local Harley Davidson dealer who donated a Harley Davidson Dyna Super Glide T Sport for a three-month trial with Gdansk (Poland) EMS.

To get the motorcycle into service, we had to improvise many things that are standard on an EMS motorcycle today. We painted the regular white fog lights blue to make the emergency lights, we found a secondhand siren that we affixed to the bike that was much larger than it should’ve been—since it was meant for a car—and we didn’t have proper motorcycle clothing, only an old helmet I had laying around. 

It was my first time riding such a big motorcycle. Until that time, my experience was riding small 350cc motorcycles. We didn’t have a proper rider training program, so it was basically just “get on and go.” My first ride on this big bike was with a passenger who was filming the experience for a local television station.

For this first trial period, we rode with two emergency personnel on the bike: a paramedic and an EMS doctor. Our EMS Harley was equipped with all the equipment found on a high-level “R” class ambulance, except the stretcher and the infusion pump. With the equipment, two large riders and the bike, it was about half a ton moving through the city streets in traffic with improvised lights and siren. 

Continued Growth

We decided to continue the program for a second year with a few changes. The bike would only have one emergency responder—either a paramedic or doctor who was comfortable riding a bike—and we upgraded the improvised lights and siren to something with better visibility and sound. It was easier to maneuver through traffic, but working alone was a totally different experience than anyone was accustomed to. 

Categories: EMS

EMS Physicians Endorse Toxicology Groups' Opioid Safety Precautions Guidance

JEMS - News - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 11:01

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) announces its endorsement of a new American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) document detailing pragmatic and actionable safety precautions for first responders in opioid overdose situations.

NAEMSP is an organization of physicians and other professionals partnering to provide leadership and foster excellence in the subspecialty of EMS medicine. In pursuing its mission to improve out-of-hospital emergency medical care, NAEMSP’s Executive Board and Standards and Clinical Practice Committee voted unanimously to endorse the opioid safety guidance. This crucial document enables an appropriate and measured communication of risk, allowing first responders to understand their genuine risk of exposure and avoid unnecessary fear or over-preparing to a point where they’re impaired in performing their job.

NAEMSP wholly endorses this impressive and highly-anticipated document and we will share it with our members and build on it with actionable guides that will be available for free to the public,” said Dr. Brent Myers, President of NAEMSP. “It’s important that our community act upon the most recent and best quality evidence available to us right now, as well as to stay vigilant and prepared to revise our procedures and advise our members as we continue to develop knowledge about dangerous substances.

Over the last year, ACMT and AACT, two key U.S. toxicology organizations, developed the document to satisfy a remarkable surge of first responder requests for fact-based opioid response safety guidance. The influx of such requests stemmed from the opioid crisis’ dramatic rise in impact and publicity, punctuated by potentially disputable accidental contact overdose reports, and the sincere desire of first responders to be able to balance protecting themselves while being able to render life-saving care to victims of this epidemic. The American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) also endorses the document, solidifying support from all three major U.S. toxicology associations.

Categories: EMS

Cummins Connected Diagnostics is Now Available Through Zonar's Smart Fleet Management System

JEMS - News - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 10:55

COLUMBUS, Indiana - Zonar, the leader in smart fleet management technology, and Cummins Inc. (NYSE: CMI), the leading independent manufacturer of diesel and natural gas engines, controls and emission solutions are announcing the availability of Cummins Connected Diagnostics to customers using Zonar's smart fleet management solution, delivering critical information to operations managers that can help optimize the performance of their fleets.

By obtaining data through Zonar's V3 telematics control unit, Cummins Connected Diagnostics wirelessly connects your engine to Cummins for immediate diagnosis of engine fault alerts. Using unique Cummins algorithms, Connected Diagnostics prioritizes engine fault information and translates it into clear, actionable recommendations that are immediately sent to operations managers. With this report, fleet managers can quickly intervene when service is needed immediately, or can proactively schedule a service event to prevent progressive damage to a vehicle. "Offering even more of our customers access to Connected Diagnostics through Zonar's V3 device, we're able to deliver the information our customers need to avoid unexpected downtime and maintenance costs, as well as improve efficiencies across their operations," said Sherry Aaholm, Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Cummins.

"We believe that by offering the advantages of Connected Diagnostics through Zonar telematics, Cummins engine customers will be empowered with actionable data to proactively manage their engines and increase the uptime of their vehicles," said Larry Jordan, Chief Product Officer at Zonar. "We see a large opportunity to help more fleets maintain a high level of fleet performance and safety while on the road through our Cummins relationship."

Connected Diagnostics is available today on vehicles operating with Zonar's V3 solution. For existing Zonar customers, Connected Diagnostics can be enabled with an easy over- the-air update. Contact Zonar at (877) 843-3847, followed by #2 for pricing and details, or contact Cummins through your Cummins representative or Cummins Care at 1-800- CUMMINS(TM) (1-800-286-6467) in North America to enable the Connected Diagnostics product. To learn more, visit cumminsengines.com/connected-diagnostics or zonarsystems.com/partners/cummins/connected-diagnostics.

Categories: EMS

President Trump to Declare Opioid Crisis a National Emergency

JEMS - News - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 10:45

BEDMINSTER, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday that he will officially declare the opioid crisis a "national emergency" and pledged to ramp up government efforts to combat the epidemic.

"The opioid crisis is an emergency. And I am saying officially right now: It is an emergency, it's a national emergency. We're going to spend a lot of time, a lot of effort and a lot of money on the opioid crisis," Trump told reporters during a brief question-and-answer session ahead of a security briefing Thursday at his golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey.

He said he'd be drawing up documents to formalize the declaration soon.

A drug commission convened by Trump and led by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie recently called on Trump to declare a national emergency to help deal with the growing crisis. An initial report from the commission noted that the approximately 142 deaths each day from drug overdoses mean the death toll is "equal to September 11th every three weeks."

Trump received a briefing on the report earlier this week during his 17-day working vacation in New Jersey.

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price seemed to suggest after that briefing that the president was leaning against the recommendation, arguing that the administration could deploy the necessary resources and attention to deal with the crisis without declaring a national emergency.

Still, Price stressed that "all things" were "on the table for the president."

Attorney General Jeff Sessions commended Trump for "taking this drastic and necessary measure to confront an opioid crisis that is devastating communities around the country and ripping families apart."

Christie applauded Trump's decision in a statement, saying the president "deserves great credit."

Categories: EMS

Flashback: Yes, 911? I’m having a feeling of impending doom.

EMScapades Cartoon - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 09:44

New comics every Tuesday and Friday!

Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Inside EMS Podcast: EMS Scope of Practice revisions that will move EMS forward

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 08:49
Inside EMS Podcast: EMS Scope of Practice revisions that will move EMS forward by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Pages

Subscribe to Volunteer Mobile Emergency Response Unit -- rehabsector.org aggregator - EMS