EMS

Suspects Wanted After Teen, Man in Wheelchair Shot

JEMS - News - 4 hours 9 min ago

WXII-TV

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Police are looking for two people who allegedly shot a 16-year-old boy and a man in a wheelchair earlier this week.

Authorities say the two suspects entered the home with handguns and stole money Tuesday morning just before 10 a.m. The incident happened not far from the Smith-Reynolds Airport, according to WXII-TV.

The man in the wheelchair, identified by police at 34-year-old Jake Westmoreland, was found shot in his home. He was reportedly put in a wheelchair after a previous shooting, the station reported.

The 16-year-old boy, whose name was not released, was shot outside the home and walked to a nearby gas station.

Both victims suffered non-life-threatening injuries and were taken to the hospital.

Categories: EMS

EMT Crew, Doctor Honored for Saving Man’s Life

JEMS - News - 5 hours 21 min ago

ABC Columbia

COLUBMIA, S.C. – An EMS crews from Richland County and a doctor were honored for saving the life of a man after suffering a medical emergency.

John Johnson ruptured a hernia and lost consciousness at home back in March, ABC Columbia reports. Police were called to his home after he did not show up to work.

The EMT crew and doctor were able to keep him alive. At a ceremony yesterday, everyone involved were honored with their own day.

Johnson has since fully recovered, the station reports.

Categories: EMS

Duo to push opioid settlement toward hospitals

JEMS - News - 7 hours 28 min ago

In a Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018 file photo, Ohio Gov. John Kasich sits for an interview with The Associated Press in Columbus. West Virginia University President Gordon Gee and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich are creating a nonprofit that will fight to steer money from any national opioid settlement to hospitals and health-based research. Gee and Kasich will announce Citizens for Effective Opioid Treatment on Thursday, August 22, 2019. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — West Virginia University President Gordon Gee and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich are creating a nonprofit that will fight to steer cash from any national opioid settlement to hospitals, rather than to local and state governments already sparring for control of the dollars.

Gee and Kasich say Citizens for Effective Opioid Treatment, a 501(c)4 organization to be announced Thursday, will educate policymakers and the public about the negative impact the opioid epidemic has had on health care infrastructure and advance health-related research solutions to the crisis.

"It's an educational effort," Gee said. "We want to help people understand that this is a crisis and that the caregivers — the hospitals, in particular — are really leading the charge in order to be able to both give care and solve the problem."

The duo's plan is the latest move in a tug-of-war over what to do with the potential billions that could flow from a national opioid settlement with drugmakers and distributors, if one is reached. Some individual settlements with counties and states have already been reached and larger pharmaceutical companies could yet cut deals as the clock ticks toward the first trial, which is set for October.

Local governments are asking the Cleveland-based federal judge who is overseeing the majority of more than 2,000 lawsuits over the toll of opioids to let them distribute money among themselves. They say being able to negotiate as a group on behalf of all or most local governments would make it possible to reach a deal with the industry. They argue the crisis has hit local governments especially hard as they've needed to spend more on police, jails and other programs.

Categories: EMS

Compromise Reached in EMS Pay Dispute in Duplin County, N.C.

JEMS - News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 16:04

 

WITN-TV

DUPLIN COUNTY, N.C. – After struggling to keep emergency medical personnel on staff because of low wages, county commissioners approved a pay raise on Monday, just not as much as first responders hoped for.

The Duplin County EMS Department proposed a 17 percent pay raise for all staff. On Monday, the county signed off on a 10 percent pay bump, saying it was a fair compromise, WITN-TV reported.

The station reports the county has struggled to keep staff in the past because of low pay.

With the pay raise, a Duplin County paramedic will be paid $16.44 an hour. Paramedics in nearby counties earn anywhere between $17 to $18 dollars an hour.

One paramedic told WITN-TV the 10 percent raise is not a permanent solution.

“We have lost some fantastic paramedics to the pay gap and that while no situation works out ideally in what we do, I feel there are people that are better able to manage those situations with less morbidity, less mortality,” paramedic Gregory Carr said.

He added he sometimes works up to four jobs to support his family.

The Duplin County manager reportedly said taxes will not go up after the recent raises.

 

Categories: EMS

Colorado School District Using Buckets Filled with Kitty Litter for Lockdowns

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 10:39

 


KDVR-TV

 

LAKEWOOD, Colo. – Back to school shopping in one school district now includes buckets and kitty litter.

About half the schools in Jefferson County now have the makeshift bathrooms in classrooms in the event of an active shooter emergency, KDVR-TV reports.

They’re also called “go buckets” and can be used by students as a makeshift bathroom during lockdowns that could last several hours.

Columbine High School, site of the infamous 1999 school shooting that took the lives of 12 students and one teacher, is located within the school district.

"I think it's a weird idea," parent Michelle Gebers told KDVR-TV. "But I guess if you're in a lockdown situation, it's not something every parent is thinking about."

The district’s school safety administrator said the idea was brought up several years ago when students were stuck in a lockdown for more than four hours.

The district has more than 150 schools.

 

Categories: EMS

Colorado School District Using Buckets Filled with Kitty Litter for Lockdowns

JEMS - News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 10:39

 


KDVR-TV

 

LAKEWOOD, Colo. – Back to school shopping in one school district now includes buckets and kitty litter.

About half the schools in Jefferson County now have the makeshift bathrooms in classrooms in the event of an active shooter emergency, KDVR-TV reports.

They’re also called “go buckets” and can be used by students as a makeshift bathroom during lockdowns that could last several hours.

Columbine High School, site of the infamous 1999 school shooting that took the lives of 12 students and one teacher, is located within the school district.

"I think it's a weird idea," parent Michelle Gebers told KDVR-TV. "But I guess if you're in a lockdown situation, it's not something every parent is thinking about."

The district’s school safety administrator said the idea was brought up several years ago when students were stuck in a lockdown for more than four hours.

The district has more than 150 schools.

 

Categories: EMS

EMTs Save Boy After Father Cuts Off Ambulance

JEMS - News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 09:00

 

CBS Boston

 

METHUEN, Mass. – Two EMTs rushing to a call were surprised when their rig was cut off by an SUV, only to find the man behind the wheel called 911 first.

Turns out, it was the same call.

Categories: EMS

Area 51 events in Nevada prompt emergency crowd planning

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Tue, 08/20/2019 - 15:17

In this July 22, 2019 file photo, signs warn about trespassing at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 outside of Rachel, Nev. Officials in Nevada's rural Lincoln County have drafted an emergency declaration and are planning with state officials to handle possible crowds that might arrive for an event next month dubbed "Storm Area 51." The county commission on Monday, Aug. 19, 2019 conditionally approved two events in tiny desert towns near the site popularly known as the home of government studies of outer space aliens. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

 

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Fearing they could be overwhelmed with visitors, officials in the remote Nevada county that's home to the Area 51 military base have drafted an emergency declaration and a plan to team resources with neighboring counties and the state ahead of events next month tied to the "Storm Area 51" internet drive.

The elected board governing the county with about 5,200 residents conditionally approved two events Monday for tiny desert towns near the once top-secret U.S. Air Force test area known in popular lore as a site for government studies of outer space aliens.

"Oh, we're taking this seriously," Lincoln County Commission Chairman Varlin Higbee told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. "With the possibility of 35,000 to 40,000 people showing up, yeah, this is serious."

County officials are concerned that a surge of visitors will crowd campsites, gas stations and public medical, internet and cellphone services. Officials count just 184 hotel rooms in the county nearly twice the size of the Connecticut.

"The cellphone system is going to go down," Higbee said. "You get more than a couple of hundred people there, and it's going to crash. Cell service won't be available."

Categories: EMS

Area 51 events in Nevada prompt emergency crowd planning

JEMS - News - Tue, 08/20/2019 - 15:17

In this July 22, 2019 file photo, signs warn about trespassing at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 outside of Rachel, Nev. Officials in Nevada's rural Lincoln County have drafted an emergency declaration and are planning with state officials to handle possible crowds that might arrive for an event next month dubbed "Storm Area 51." The county commission on Monday, Aug. 19, 2019 conditionally approved two events in tiny desert towns near the site popularly known as the home of government studies of outer space aliens. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

 

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Fearing they could be overwhelmed with visitors, officials in the remote Nevada county that's home to the Area 51 military base have drafted an emergency declaration and a plan to team resources with neighboring counties and the state ahead of events next month tied to the "Storm Area 51" internet drive.

The elected board governing the county with about 5,200 residents conditionally approved two events Monday for tiny desert towns near the once top-secret U.S. Air Force test area known in popular lore as a site for government studies of outer space aliens.

"Oh, we're taking this seriously," Lincoln County Commission Chairman Varlin Higbee told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. "With the possibility of 35,000 to 40,000 people showing up, yeah, this is serious."

County officials are concerned that a surge of visitors will crowd campsites, gas stations and public medical, internet and cellphone services. Officials count just 184 hotel rooms in the county nearly twice the size of the Connecticut.

"The cellphone system is going to go down," Higbee said. "You get more than a couple of hundred people there, and it's going to crash. Cell service won't be available."

Categories: EMS

EMT in Small Plane Crash Wants to Train Other First Responders

JEMS - News - Tue, 08/20/2019 - 13:37

 

KFOR-TV

 

CORDELL, Okla. – An EMT from Oklahoma badly hurt in a small plane crash wants to make sure first responders have better training dealing with aircraft rescue.

Devin Humphrey, who in addition to being an EMT, is his town’s assistant fire chief, says he’s lucky to be alive after crashing a plane on August 9.

He tells KFOR-TV crosswind hit the aircraft and he did not correct for it enough. That caused the plane to flip and crash at Cordell Municipal Airport.

It was Humphrey’s fellow first responders who had to save him after suffering a concussion, a broken rib and a bruised lung.

“I gotta brag on my EMS crew and fire for tackling such a task and getting me out of it alive. We hadn’t really, we had never trained on anything like this before,” he said during the interview.

Humphrey now plans on meeting with other first responders and creating small aircraft rescue and firefighting courses.

He believes the course will be the first of its kind in the nation.

Despite the accident, Humphrey says he is excited to fly again.

Categories: EMS

International Association of Fire Chiefs CEO and Executive Director Mark Light Retires

JEMS - News - Tue, 08/20/2019 - 08:44

On August 19, 2019, the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) announced that Mark Light has retired from his position as CEO and Executive Director.

Mark Light said, “It is with mixed emotions that I announce my retirement. It has been my sincere honor to lead the IAFC as CEO and Executive Director for the past 12 years. IAFC has accomplished many things during my tenure and I am proud of these accomplishments. None of those accomplishments could have happened without the full support of the IAFC Board of Directors and the IAFC staff. I cherish the relationships I’ve developed with so many of individuals over the years. Know that I am sad to step away from working with and for a vibrant and remarkable organization. The fire service is the most noble industry on planet Earth. It has been my sincere privilege to serve this profession for over 42 years.”

IAFC President (2018-19), Dan Eggleston, said, “Under Mark’s leadership, IAFC has expanded learning opportunities and executive fire officer training for leaders and emerging leaders, promoted diversity and inclusion in the fire and emergency service with iDELP and Women Chiefs Council, increased its operating budget from $10.5 million to $22.5 million, relocated its headquarters to a location that is better suited for IAFC business needs, implemented a social media and the conneXions education programs, and experienced a growth in IAFC staff from 32 to 68 employees. On behalf of the Board and the membership, we thank Mark for his contributions and wish him well.”

“We now begin a search for a new CEO and Executive Director to lead IAFC in achieving its short- and long-term strategic goals. The Board and I look forward to working with the next CEO and Executive Director to advance IAFC’s mission of supporting current and future fire and emergency service leaders worldwide through vision, information, education, services and representation to enhance their professionalism and capabilities.”

Categories: EMS

EMT Killed in Demolition Derby Crash

JEMS - News - Tue, 08/20/2019 - 08:37

GoFundMe

EMT Darylynne Day was killed Sunday in a crash at a demolition derby in Deer Lodge, Montana. She leaves behind two children and a husband.

 

DEER LODGE, Mont. – A Powell County EMT was killed after an accident at a demolition derby on Sunday, authorities and friends said.

A GoFundMe page has been set up by friends of Darylynne Day, who leaves behind two young children and a husband.

NBC Montana reports the accident happened during the annual Tri-County Fair. It’s not clear if Day was working the event as an EMT or there as a spectator.

Powell County Sheriff Gavin Roselles reportedly said the crash happened when one car jumped a fence and landed on nearby bleachers after becoming disabled on the track. Several people were trapped underneath the car.

Seven people were sent to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Roselles said first responders jumped in right away help.

The crash remains under investigation.

Donations for Day’s funeral can also be mailed to John Carlbom at 1003 Dixon Street, Deer Lodge, Montana, 59722.

Categories: EMS

International Prehospital Medicine Institute Literature Review, August 2019

JEMS - News - Mon, 08/19/2019 - 12:03

International Prehospital Medicine Institute

A look at some of the most up-to-date prehospital information and education to those who provide emergency medical care in the prehospital setting.

 

Introduction

The mission of the International Prehospital Medicine Institute (IPHMI) is to provide the most up-to-date prehospital information and education at an affordable cost to those individuals worldwide who provide emergency medical care in the prehospital setting.

In service to that mission, we review the published literature specific to prehospital care. We then summarize the article to help explain exactly what it is saying, what it is not saying, and what it means to you, your practice, and your patients. It is essential that every prehospital provider see, read, critically review, and understand what is being published in the medical literature as relates to their practice since it is this research that defines, supports, and refines the care provided in the prehospital setting. For the past year, we have been publishing these reviews on our website. We are now partnering with JEMS who will publish these reviews monthly in its online journal, exposing these reviews to a wider audience.

We are excited about this partnership and as more develops we'll tell you about it in these pages too. We hope you enjoy the reviews and will visit us at IPHMI.com to see what else we are working on.

 

Vol. 1.11

1. Prehospital Use of Ketamine: Effectiveness in Critically Ill and Injured Patients. Zietlow J, Burns K, Jenkins D, Zietlow S. Mil Med. 2019 Mar 1. 184(Supplement):542-544.

2. Timing of Advanced Airway Management by Emergency Medical Services Personnel following Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Population-Based Cohort Study. Izawa, J, Iwami, T Gibo, K, Okubo, M, Kajino, K, Kiyohara, K, et al. Resuscitation 2018;128:16-23.

Categories: EMS

Gov't wants a new 911-like number just for suicide hotline

JEMS - News - Fri, 08/16/2019 - 13:10

In this Sunday, Aug. 11, 2019, photo, a man uses a cell phone in New Orleans. With suicides on the rise, the government wants to make the national crisis hotline easier to reach. Once implemented, people will just need to dial 988 to seek help. Currently, National Suicide Prevention Lifeline uses a 10-digit number, 800-273-TALK (8255). Callers are routed to one of 163 crisis centers, where counselors answered 2.2 million calls last year. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane)

 

NEW YORK (AP) — With suicides on the rise, the U.S. government wants to make the national crisis hotline easier to reach.

Once implemented, people will just need to dial 988 to seek help. Currently, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline uses a 10-digit number, 800-273-TALK (8255). Callers are routed to one of 163 crisis centers, where counselors answered 2.2 million calls last year.

A law passed last year required the Federal Communications Commission to study assigning a three-digit number for suicide prevention, like 911 for emergencies or 311 for city services. The FCC said in a Wednesday report that there is "overwhelming support" for a three-digit number because it would be easier for distressed people to get help.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said he intends to start the months-long process to make that happen.

Anything that makes it easier for people having suicidal thoughts — and their loved ones — to reach out for assistance is good, said Dr. Lynn Bufka, an associate executive director at the American Psychological Association. "There's no way most of them are going to remember the 800 numbers. 988 makes it much easier to remember."

The government's action comes as suicide rates have increased across the U.S. over the past two decades, and dramatically so — by more than 30% — in half of U.S. states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There were 45,000 deaths in 2016.

The new, shorter number would likely lead to more calls, which in turn would mean more expenses for crisis centers already struggling to keep up. If the number of calls to the hotline doubled, centers would need an extra $50 million a year to handle the increase, the FCC said, citing the federal agency that funds the hotline, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Categories: EMS

Inside EMS: Misconceptions about airway management and the industry gold standard

FR1 and EMS Podcasts - Fri, 08/16/2019 - 12:29
Inside EMS: Misconceptions about airway management and the industry gold standard by FR1 and EMS1 Podcasts
Categories: EMS, Podcasts

Woodstock at 50: EMS Response

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Fri, 08/16/2019 - 10:52

Editors note: Fifty years ago this week, “three days of peace and music” were underway at Max Yasgur's upstate New York farm. The 1969 Woodstock Festival had the potential to generate a medical disaster of epic proportions. Although the planning proved woefully inadequate, the festival came off with a minimum of death and injury. 

For a look back at what happened, read "EMS at Woodstock," originally published in JEMS on April 28, 2010.

Categories: EMS

Churches Arm, Train Congregants in Wake of Mass Shootings

JEMS - News - Fri, 08/16/2019 - 10:31

HASLET, Texas (AP) — Acrid gun smoke clouded the sunny entrance of a Texas church on a recent Sunday.

Seven men wearing heavy vests and carrying pistols loaded with blanks ran toward the sound of the shots, stopping at the end of a long hallway. As one peeked into the foyer, the "bad guy" raised the muzzle of an AR-15, took aim and squeezed the trigger.

The simulated gunfight at the church in Haslet was part of a niche industry that trains civilians to protect their churches using the techniques and equipment of law enforcement. Rather than a bullet, the rifle fired a laser that hit Stephen Hatherley's vest — triggering an electric shock the 60-year-old Navy veteran later described as a "tingle."

Photos: Training Church Security

The shootings this month killed more than 30 people at an El Paso Walmart and Dayton, Ohio entertainment district. But gunmen have also targeted houses of worships in recent years, includinga church in rural Sutherland Springs, Texas, where more than two dozen people were shot dead in 2017.

The anxiety of one mass shooting after another has led some churches to start training and arming their worshippers with guns. Not all security experts support this approach, but it has gained momentum as congregations across the country grapple with how to secure spaces where welcoming strangers is a religious practice.

"Ten years ago, this industry was not a thing," said David Riggall, a Texas police officer whose company trains churchgoers to volunteer as security guards. "I mean, sanctuary means a safe place."

In 1993, Doug Walker said security wasn't at the fore of his mind when, as a recent Baptist seminary graduate, he founded Fellowship of the Parks church in Fort Worth. But six years later, after a gunman killed seven people and took his own life at another church in the Texas city, the pastor said his thinking changed.

Categories: EMS

17 Hospitalized in North Carolina Passenger Van Crash

JEMS - News - Fri, 08/16/2019 - 10:03

HENRICO, N.C. (AP) — First responders in North Carolina say 17 people have been brought to the hospital with injuries ranging from critical to nonurgent after a multi-passenger van rolled over and crashed.

Gaston Fire, Rescue and EMS posted in a Facebook news release that agencies responded to a crash report Thursday evening near Henrico, North Carolina, and found more than a dozen injured. It says 11 patients were in nonurgent condition, five were urgent and one was critical.

Officials say one was victim was found trapped inside the van and responders used hydraulic rescue cutters and saws to remove them.

At least five agencies including fire services, rescue squads and sheriff's deputies responded to the crash, which left much of the road closed for hours.

North Carolina Highway Patrol is investigating.

All contents © copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Categories: EMS

Unattended Objects Prompt Bomb Scare Inside Manhattan Subway

EMS-1 Major Incidents - Fri, 08/16/2019 - 09:29

NEW YORK (AP) — Two abandoned objects that appeared to be pressure cookers prompted an evacuation of a major lower Manhattan subway station during the morning commute Friday before police determined they were not explosives.

The bomb squad cleared the items found at the Fulton Street station, New York Police Department Counterterrorism Chief James Waters said on Twitter.

Waters posted photos of the objects, which looked like pressure cookers or crockpots.

"The suspicion is that they were placed there to suggest that they were electronic devices and possible bombs," Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on WCBS-AM.


This photo provided by NYPD shows a suspicious object which looks like a pressure cooker or electric crockpot on the floor of the New York City Subway platform on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 in New York. Police say two suspicious objects that prompted an evacuation of the major lower Manhattan subway station during the morning commute are not explosives. New York Police Department Counterterrorism Chief James Waters tweeted Friday that the bomb squad cleared the items found at the Fulton Street station. (NYPD via AP)

The station is a busy transit hub a few blocks from the World Trade Center, and the proximity to the site of the Sept. 11 attacks served to heighten anxiety before the all-clear was given.

"This is a frightening world we live in, and all of these situations have to be taken seriously because God forbid one day ... it's a real device," Cuomo said. "We learned the hard way after 9/11, and we are prepared."


This photo provided by NYPD shows a suspicious object which looks like a pressure cooker or electric crockpot on the floor of the New York City Subway platform on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 in New York. Police say two suspicious objects that prompted an evacuation of the major lower Manhattan subway station during the morning commute are not explosives. New York Police Department Counterterrorism Chief James Waters tweeted Friday that the bomb squad cleared the items found at the Fulton Street station. (NYPD via AP)

Categories: EMS

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