Fire Service

CO FIREFIGHTER INJURED IN FIRE AT FIREHOUSE

Firefighter Close Calls - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 07:45

One firefighter was injured Thursday morning after a brush fire truck caught fire inside a fire station.

Around 2 a.m., the vehicle, which was parked in one of the bays at a South Adams County Fire Rescue station, caught fire.

Firefighters at Station 28 on Walden Street woke up to the smell of smoke and immediately worked to extinguish the fire, said Maria Carabajal, spokeswoman with the department. Brighton Fire Rescue also worked to put out the fire.

All of the firefighters from that station were moved to another one, and the station closed.

A lieutenant was taken to a hospital for smoke inhalation, Carabajal said. He has since been released.

Authorities are assessing the cause and damage.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

Today is Friday the 12th of April, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 06:46

We close out this week from FDIC in Indianapolis with the following stories…

I’m going to be at booth 2207 until the show closes tomorrow, so if your in the vicinity, stop by to say hello.

Have a great weekend, be safe out there!

Tom

The post Today is Friday the 12th of April, 2019 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Plane crashes in Georgia, 1 flown to hospital with ‘serious injuries’

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 06:42

by Claire Helm

SUMTER COUNTY, Ga. — A plane crash in Sumter County has sent one person to the hospital with “serious injuries.” 

Sumter County Fire and Rescue, which said the crash happened in the Hodges Field area of Americus. The FAA says it occurred during takeoff at 11:45 a.m.

Fire officials said a person had become trapped inside the crashed aircraft, and it took about 10 minutes to get them out before they were flown to the closest trauma center.

Fifteen firefighters and the sheriff’s office responded to the scene.

Sumter County Fire & Rescue

At 10:51am this morning SCFR was dispatched to Hodges Field to a plane crash. Central dispatch notified responding personnel that there was a plane down in the field near Hodges Field with one person trapped in the aircraft. Upon arrival SCFR personnel reported to all incoming units that one person was trapped in the plane with serious injuries. As our rescue and engine arrived on the scene in 7 minutes. The scene was secured and a 1&3/4 handlines was pulled because of a fuel leak. Extrcation was initiated and it took approximately 10 minutes to extricate the pilot. The patient was turned over to GoldStar EMS and was flown to the nearest trauma center. 15 firefighters responded with Engine 11 and Resue 1. SCSO also responded. All SCFR units are back in service.

https://wgxa.tv/news/local/plane-crashes-in-sumter-county-1-flown-to-hospital-with-serious-injuries

The post Plane crashes in Georgia, 1 flown to hospital with ‘serious injuries’ appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Small Plane Flips During Landing At Fullerton Airport

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 06:39

FULLERTON (CBSLA) – No one was hurt after a Cessna crash landed at Fullerton Municipal Airport Thursday morning.

Sometime before noon, the Cessna 172 flipped over after landing on Runway 24, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

There were two people aboard, but neither was hurt, the FAA reports.

A group of firefighters conducting a drill nearby at the time responded to the scene, according to Metro Net Fire dispatchers.

Fullerton police were assisting the FAA with the investigation into what exactly caused the crash.

Small Plane Flips During Landing At Fullerton Airport

The post Small Plane Flips During Landing At Fullerton Airport appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Pilot in “good condition” after small plane crash in Fulton

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 06:37

FULTON, N.Y. (WSYR-TV) — A small aircraft   crashed in the city of Fulton Thursday afternoon.

Oswego County 911 h says the aircraft crashed around 3:30 p.m. near North Fourth Street.

The pilot, 50-year-old Michael Simpson, was transported to Upstate with non-life-threatening injuries and is in “good condition” according to Upstate University’s media relations.

Fulton Police believe Simpson was trying to land on the highway and that his plane may have lost power.

Police say he was flying from Malone, N.Y. (which is about 170 miles north of Fulton) to the Oswego Airport.

NewsChannel 9 has a crew on scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

https://www.localsyr.com/news/local-news/breaking-report-of-a-small-aircraft-down-in-fulton/1918567267

The post Pilot in “good condition” after small plane crash in Fulton appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Small plane flips in field at the Union County Airport

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 06:36

by WSYX/WTTE

MARYSVILLE, Ohio — Investigators are trying to figure out what happened after a single engine plane crashed and flipped upside down at the Union County Airport Thursday afternoon.

Witnesses say it happened right near the runaway. Deputies say the 21-year-old pilot from Cambridge denied medical treatment. He was seen walking around at the scene and appeared to be fine witnesses said.

The crash happened just before 4:00 PM. Deputies say when he was landing, it appears the plane was caught by a cross breeze, causing it to flip. The FAA will be at the scene Friday to inspect the plane.

https://abc6onyourside.com/news/local/small-plane-flips-in-field-at-the-union-county-airport

The post Small plane flips in field at the Union County Airport appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

FAA: 2 injured following plane crash behind Wilcox Technical High School

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 06:34

By Olivia LankRoger Susanin

MERIDEN, CT (WFSB) – A plane crashed behind a high school in Meriden Thursday evening.

According to the FAA, a Pipe PA-28 aircraft crashed on the H.C. Wilcox Technical High School baseball field around 6:55 p.m. 

Two people were on board the plane at the time of the crash.

According to the Meriden Police Department, a pilot and passenger were on the plane and are expected to survive.

Both were conscious when emergency responders arrived on the scene and were brought to area hospitals with injuries.

The extent of their injuries is unknown.

Police have not released their identities at this point, but said the pilot is in his 50s and the passenger is a man in his 30s.

“It’s a sigh of relief, the first thing we care about is the preservation of life. We want to try and help anybody in any fashion we can,” said Sgt. Christopher Fry, Meriden Police Department.

It appears the pilot was working on flight maneuvers when the crash took place.

“From what I understand, he was practicing what’s known in the field as touch and go. Practicing landing and taking off, and what happened from there is too early to tell,” said Fry.

Wilcox High School will be closed on Friday due to the crash.

The crash was reported just over a mile away from Meriden Markham Airport.

https://www.wfsb.com/news/plane-crash-reported-on-oregon-road-in-meriden/article_99709cce-5cb1-11e9-b945-bf2bf91b9068.html

The post FAA: 2 injured following plane crash behind Wilcox Technical High School appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Four men rescued after surviving plane crash north of Bethel

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 06:32

By KTUU Digital Staff

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) — A pilot and three passengers were rescued by an Alaska Army Guard helicopter team after a Yute Air flight crashed 30 miles northeast of Bethel around 5:00 p.m. Thursday.

According to Alaska State Troopers, reports were received around 5 p.m. Thursday of a downed aircraft approximately 30 miles northeast of Bethel.

The aircraft, identified as a chartered Yute Air PA-32 flight from Aniak to Bethel, was carrying a pilot and three male passengers, all of whom survived the crash.

AST says an Alaska Army Guard UH-60 helicopter from Bethel was launched and successfully retrieved the four men, who were taken to Bethel.

The extent of their injuries, if any, is unknown.

AST says the NTSB and FAA have been notified.

https://www.ktuu.com/content/news/Four-men-rescued-after-surviving-plane-crash-north-of-Bethel-508473031.html

The post Four men rescued after surviving plane crash north of Bethel appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 06:30

39 Years ago today: On 12 April 1980 a Transbrasil Boeing 727 crashed on approach to Florianopolis, Brazil, killing 55 out of 58 occupants.

Date: Saturday 12 April 1980 Time: 20:38 Type: Boeing 727-27C Operator: Transbrasil Registration: PT-TYS C/n / msn: 19111/297 First flight: 1966-07-01 (13 years 10 months) Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7 Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 8 Passengers: Fatalities: 47 / Occupants: 50 Total: Fatalities: 55 / Occupants: 58 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 24 km (15 mls) from Florianópolis-Hercilio Luz International Airport, SC (FLN) (   Brazil) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: São Paulo-Congonhas Airport, SP (CGH/SBSP), Brazil Destination airport: Florianópolis-Hercilio Luz International Airport, SC (FLN/SBFL), Brazil Flightnumber: 303

Narrative:
The Boeing was off course during an instrument approach to Florianopolis and struck a hill. The aircraft was flown by an inspector pilot on a training mission. A severe thunderstorm was active in the area

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSES: Misjudged speed and distance, inadequate flight supervision, failure to initiate a go-around and improper operation of the engines.

The post Today in History appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

FIREFIGHTER HISTORY 4/12

Firefighter Close Calls - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 04:23

4/12/1895 a Worcester, MA firefighter died while fighting a fire in “a four-story brick clothing factory that was fully involved. Fire fighting efforts were hampered by wire-laden telegraph poles around the building and high winds. The members of Truck 3 were moving a 65-foot Bangor ladder in the alleyway when the roof and sections of a wall collapsed on them. The firefighter was killed, and another firefighter was seriously injured.”

4/12/1916 a Detroit, MI firefighter “died from internal injuries after having fallen off a ladder.”

4/12/1917 an Ashburnham, MA firefighter died while operating at a fire involving the Cushing Academy.

4/12/1917 a Brooklyn, New York (FDNY) firefighter “died as a result of inhaling poisonous gas while operating at a fire in a dye works factory.”

4/12/1917 a Queens, New York (FDNY) firefighter died “while operating at a four-alarm fire, he was killed when he was caught under a collapsing wall.”

4/12/1957 a Piedomont, CA firefighter died from the injuries he sustained while operating at a fire.

4/12/1972 a Richmond, VA firefighter “was crushed to death when a quantity of water-soaked bales of cotton fell on him during a warehouse fire.”

4/12/2009 two Houston, TX firefighters died at a residential structure fire just after midnight. “Engine 26 was the first to arrive on the scene approximately 6 minutes after dispatch. They found a large residence with smoke showing. The two firefighters and another firefighter advanced an attack line to the interior of the structure. As the line was advanced, the third firefighter had to withdraw from the structure due to an issue with his protective clothing. Approximately 7 minutes after the arrival of Engine 26 on the scene, fire conditions changed rapidly, and firefighters exited the building. The IC declared a defensive strategy and apparatus air horns were sounded to announce the evacuation of the building. Firefighters realized that the two firefighters were missing. Firefighters used master streams and handlines to try to control the fire. Approximately 30 minutes after the switch to defensive strategy, firefighters were able to enter the structure and both firefighters were found. Both firefighters were removed to the front yard of the home and resuscitative efforts were made, to no avail. The cause of death was listed as thermal injuries and smoke inhalation. The Structure was a large, one-story, ranch-style structure at 7811 Oak Vista, in District. The fire went to a 2 alarm.”

4/12/2015 a Valley Springs, SD firefighter “died from injuries sustained while working interior fire operations at the scene of a residential structure fire. He was found in the basement of the home after fire crews were ordered out of the structure due to fire conditions. The 47-year-old homeowner, had been rescued by fire crews and transported to the hospital soon after they arrived on-scene but did not survive his injuries.”

4/12/2016 a Freeport, IL firefighter “passed away from injuries sustained from exposure to toxic substance while battling a house fire.”

4/12/2015 a mistake led to the deaths of four elderly Queens, NY residents after someone in the house absentmindedly left the car idling in the garage allowing exhaust fumes (carbon-monoxide) to fill the structure.

4/12/2014 Valparaiso, Chile wildland fire killed twelve, destroyed hundreds of homes, and forces thousands to evacuate.

4/12/1979 a fireworks factory fire killed thirty-two in Rawalpindi, Pakistan’

4/12/1911 Goldfield, Nevada the Merchants Hotel was destroyed by fire around 1:00 a.m. that extended to three adjoining buildings. “The fire was caused by throwing a glass of water into the stove to create steam to blow the soot from the stove pipe. An explosion resulted and the force unjointed the pipe in a room on the second floor. Through the aperture thus created hot coals were scattered over the carpet.”

4/12/1908 nearly half the city, 18 blocks, were destroyed in the 1st Great Chelsea (MA) fire (the 2nd conflagration occurs on 10/14/1973) that left twelve dead, eighty-five missing and presumed dead and more than 17,000 homeless that started at the Boston Blacking Company, a company that made shoes and shoe adhesives.

4/12/1861 the Civil War began when Confederates open fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina’s Charleston Bay

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

Veteran fire captain arrested after off-duty dare from girlfriend to walk naked into 7-11

Statter 911 - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 18:48

Lynnfield, MA Capt. John Walsh placed on leave after Rhode Island arrest

The post Veteran fire captain arrested after off-duty dare from girlfriend to walk naked into 7-11 appeared first on Statter911.

Categories: Fire Service

Has the news media pushed bad info on fentanyl’s danger to fire, police & EMS?

Statter 911 - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 13:41

Journalism review article highlights the myth of overdosing through skin contact

The post Has the news media pushed bad info on fentanyl’s danger to fire, police & EMS? appeared first on Statter911.

Categories: Fire Service

5 FIREFIGHTERS INJURED AT YONKERS GARBAGE FIRE

Firefighter Close Calls - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 07:46

Five firefighters suffered injuries on Tuesday morning as they battled a blaze that broke out in a Westchester waste management facility.

Fire crews responded to the A-1 Compaction facility at 325 Yonkers Ave. in Yonkers shortly before 10 a.m. on Tuesday, April 9, where the fire sent smoke soaring through the windy conditions.

Yonkers Deputy Fire Chief Daniel Flynn said that upon arrival, firefighters found a heavy volume of fire that had been started in a garbage fire.

Flynn said that the fire was under control as of 2:38 p.m. and extinguished by 3:30 p.m. Five firefighters were treated for minor injuries sustained in the progress. Flynn noted that mutual aid was sent to Yonkers by fire departments in New Rochelle, Mount Vernon and Eastchester. In total, 13 fire companies, including approximately 60 firefighters responded to the blaze. As of noon on Tuesday, the fire had not been completely extinguished, Flynn said.

The fire led police to temporarily shut down Yonkers Avenue in both directions.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

Today is Thursday the 11th of April, 2019

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 07:11

From the Fire Department Instructors Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana,  here are the stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

The post Today is Thursday the 11th of April, 2019 appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Aircraft Emergencies at Redmond, Sisters Airports

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 07:09

by Heather Roberts

REDMOND, OR — Two aircraft emergencies occurred at two Central Oregon airports about an hour apart, Wednesday morning. The first involved a United Express plane at the Redmond Airport. According to a passenger aboard the plane, the pilot said there was a malfunction in the landing system and the crew was forced to apply the emergency brakes. The plane was stopped on the ground by the time first responders arrived. There were 23 passengers on board and everyone deplaned safely; no injuries were reported.

Airport Director Zach Bass says all four tires on the small plane were flat. In his years at Roberts Field, he says it’s the first time he’s seen that occur with a commercial aircraft. The plane remains disabled on the secondary runway until a mechanic and new tires can be flown in. Bass says it’s not impacting airport operations. About an hour later, at around 10:45 a.m., a small plane flipped on to its top at the Sisters Eagle Airport. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office reports the pilot and passenger were able to get out on their own and were not seriously hurt.

A Black Butte Police Sergeant saw the single engine plane flip while attempting to land and radioed for assistance from the Sheriff’s Office and Sisters Fire. Arriving crews found the plane just off the runway, on its top. The runway was closed for about 90 minutes for the investigation. The Sheriff’s Office says the pilot, 73-year-old Brian Lansburgh, of Sisters, was attempting to land when a gust of wind caused the plane to flip. Lansburgh and his passenger, 88-year-old John Watson of Bend, were the only two aboard at the time of the incident.

http://kbnd.com/kbnd-news/local-news-feed/434724

The post Aircraft Emergencies at Redmond, Sisters Airports appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

American Airlines flight returns to JFK Airport after clipping wing

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 07:06

NEW YORK (WABC) — An American Airlines flight was forced to return to JFK Airport Wednesday night after it clipped its wing upon departure.

The FAA says Flight 300 that was bound from New York to Los Angeles landed safely at 9:15 p.m.

The pilot reported that the Airbus 321 may have collided with an object during departure. Pictures of the damaged wing were taken by passengers on board.

American Airlines says the flight took off from Kennedy at 8:40 p.m. but returned a short time later.

After the aircraft landed, workers discovered damage to the left wing, possibly caused by striking a runway sign and airport light on departure.

According to a passenger, the plane went sideways after takeoff and the pilot had to straighten it out.

“The plane veered left when it hit something and then it took a sharp right turn at takeoff where I was on the right side of the plane and I was looking straight down at the ground,” said Scott Laser, a passenger. “I cried the whole way back and many others did also.”

The plane was in the air for about 15 minutes before the pilot announced that they were heading back to JFK.

The FAA is investigating. They released a statement saying, “The pilot reported that the Airbus 321 may have collided with an object during departure…workers discovered damage to the left wing, possibly caused by striking a runway sign and airport light departure.”

American Airlines also released the following statement, “American Airlines flight 300 from New York (JFK) to Los Angeles (LAX) returned to JFK this evening after the aircraft struck an object upon departure.
The flight which took off at 8:40 p.m. ET, landed safely at JFK at 9:09 p.m. ET, and taxied to the gate. There were 101 passengers and 8 crew members on the Airbus A321 aircraft, and no injuries were reported. American is swapping flight 300 to a new aircraft, as our team reviews the incident and inspects the aircraft. We never want to disrupt our customers’ travel plans and we are sorry for the inconvenience.”

The Port Authority says the flight may have been slightly off center during takeoff.

https://abc7ny.com/american-airlines-flight-returns-to-jfk-after-hitting-object-on-departure/5242796/

The post American Airlines flight returns to JFK Airport after clipping wing appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

150/5210-19B – Draft AC 150/5210-19B, Driver’s Enhanced Vision System (DEVS) Document Information

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 07:04

150/5210-19B – Draft AC 150/5210-19B, Driver’s Enhanced Vision System (DEVS)

Date Issued

April 10, 2019

Responsible Office

AAS-300,  Office of Airport Safety and Operations – Airport Safety & Operations Division

Description

The standards and guidelines contained in this AC are practices the FAA recommends in establishing an acceptable level of safety, performance and operation of DEVS equipment on Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) vehicles.

The post 150/5210-19B – Draft AC 150/5210-19B, Driver’s Enhanced Vision System (DEVS) Document Information appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

09-APR-2019 Report: Airbus A320 damaged at Dubai when water salute goes wrong

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 07:03

The UAE GCAA released an incident report of a Saudia Airlines Airbus A320 that was damaged at Dubai when water salute went wrong.

Date: 20-SEP-2018 Time: c. 10:40 LT Type: Airbus A320-214 (WL) Owner/operator: Saudi Arabian Airlines Registration: HZ-AS55 C/n / msn: 7550 Fatalities: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 126 Other fatalities: 0 Aircraft damage: Minor Category: Incident Location: Dubai International Airport (OMDB) –    United Arab Emirates Phase: Taxi Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Jeddah King Abdulaziz International Airport (JED) Destination airport: Dubai Airport (DXB/OMDB)

Narrative:
On 20 September 2018 at 10:38 local time, Saudia Airlines flight SV566 from Jeddah King Abdulaziz International Airport (OEJN), Saudi Arabia, operated by an Airbus A320-214 aircraft, registration HZ-AS55, landed at Dubai International Airport (OMDB), the United Arab Emirates.
The flight and the landing were uneventful and the aircraft taxied to gate C58 as instructed.
After turning towards the terminal, two firefighting vehicles, which were located on either side of the taxiway, started spraying jets of water to welcome the aircraft with a water salute in celebration of the Saudi Arabia National Day. The vehicle turret operators selected a water jet with a high kinetic energy to form a far-reaching arc.
The fire-fighting vehicle positioned on the left side of the Aircraft, FIRE 8, experienced a problem with the roof turret, which ceased to follow the operator’s input from the hand controller. The high pressure water jet was suddenly sprayed upwards and then downwards, as the aircraft passed underneath. The Aircraft was struck by the water jet causing the left forward over-wing emergency exit hatch to open. The hatch fell into the cabin. This resulted in the deployment of the left over-wing emergency slide ramp.
The flight crew was alerted to the opening of the emergency hatch by the master warning system and stopped the Aircraft immediately. They were not aware that a water salute had been arranged on arrival at the gate and therefore they could not inform the cabin crew or passengers prior to the event.
The aircraft was towed to the gate with the slide ramp attached, where the passengers disembarked normally.

The deployment of the over-wing emergency exit hatch into the cabin slightly injured the passenger seated in the adjacent window seat. The passenger received medical attention and decided to continue their journey after being medically cleared.

Causes:
The Air Accident Investigation Sector determines that the cause of the Incident was the erratic directional movement of the water jet onto
the push panel of the left forward over-wing emergency exit hatch, which, when pushed inwards, resulted in the emergency exit hatch
opening and falling into the cabin, slightly injuring the passenger seated in the window seat.

Contributing Factors to the Incident:
The Air Accident Investigation Sector identifies the following contributing factors to the Incident:
(a) The fire vehicle’s hand controller potentiometer failed to control the movements of the roof turret.
(b) The process of a water salute had not been formally described and risk assessed by the airport fire service, thus the possibility of erratic water turret movement was not identified.

Full report here;

https://www.gcaa.gov.ae/en/ePublication/admin/iradmin/Lists/Incidents%20Investigation%20Reports/Attachments/120/2018-2018%20-%20Summary%20Report,%20AIFN-0011-2018,%20HZ-AS55,%20Incident.pdf

The post 09-APR-2019 Report: Airbus A320 damaged at Dubai when water salute goes wrong appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 07:01

67 Years ago today: On 11 April 1952 a PanAm Douglas DC-4 crashed into the sea after takeoff from San Juan, killing 52 out of 69 occupants.

Date: Friday 11 April 1952 Time: 12:20 AST Type: Douglas DC-4 Operator: Pan American World Airways (Pan Am) Registration: N88899 C/n / msn: 10503 First flight: 1945 Total airframe hrs: 20835 Engines:Pratt & Whitney R-2000 Crew: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 5 Passengers: Fatalities: 52 / Occupants: 64 Total: Fatalities: 52 / Occupants: 69 Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 18 km (11.3 mls) NW off San Juan-Isla Grande Airport (SIG) (   Puerto Rico) Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: San Juan-Isla Grande Airport (SIG/TJIG), Puerto Rico Destination airport: New York-Idlewild International Airport, NY (IDL/KIDL), United States of America Flightnumber: PA526A

Narrative:
The aircraft, named “Clipper Endeavour” took off from San Juan at 12:11 for a flight to New York when the no. 3 engine failed. The prop was feathered at 350 feet and the crew elected to return to San Juan. The aircraft reached an altitude of 550 feet but the no. 4 engine ran roughly and height couldn’t be maintained. To avoid a possible forced landing in a congested area or on coral reef, the aircraft was ditched 11 miles NW of San Juan Airport, 4,5 miles offshore. The rear fuselage broke off behind the bulkhead aft of the main cabin. The plane sank in about 3 minutes

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “a) The company’s inadequate maintenance in not changing the No. 3 engine which resulted in its failure immediately subsequent to take-off, and b) The persistent action of the captain in attempting to re-establish a climb, without using all available power, following the critical loss of power to another engine. This resulted in a nose-high attitude, progressive loss of airspeed and the settling of the aircraft at too low an altitude to effect recovery,”

The post Today in History appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

FIREFIGHTER HISTORY 4/11

Firefighter Close Calls - Thu, 04/11/2019 - 03:46

4/11/1874 a Baltimore, MD firefighter died after extinguishing a fire in a grocery store, several firefighters entered the basement with lanterns to overhaul. Without warning, a barrel of gasoline suddenly exploded after the fumes came in contact with one of the lanterns. All of the men were badly burned.

4/11/1902 a Chicago, IL firefighter “died while fighting an apartment building fire at 5133 South Cottage Grove Avenue. The Renfost apartment building was built as a luxury hotel for the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, and the fire in the seven-story building started in the basement, after a worker left a small hand furnace running when he left the building for lunch. The building’s elevator boy discovered the fire shortly after noon, but the fire spread quickly due to the dry wood building materials inside the building and the forty-mile per- hour wind outside the building. The building was fully involved when the first fire companies arrived on scene, and a 4-11 alarm was raised. The victim was off duty but responded to the alarm. He was operating outside of the building when an outer wall collapsed, and he was crushed to death by falling debris.”

4/11/1944 a Buffalo, NY firefighter, two hotel employees were overcome by carbon monoxide gas and killed, nineteen other firefighters were also overcome during rescue operations at the Statler Hotel Downtown. “Two hotel workers were sent to investigate a strange odor and fumes coming up the coal ash conveyor chute 40′ below ground in the basement area. One became unconscious and the other man fled for help. As firefighters attempted to rescue him, attempts were met with more men being overcome. Finally, a wall in the banquet kitchen was breached, and firefighters using air masks were able to reach the victims.”

4/11/1953 a Times Square (New York, NY) a three-alarm fire started in Hectors Restaurant on 50th Street at Broadway. “The flames extended from the kitchen ventilation system and ignited the huge Majestic Danceland on the second floor. The fire continued spreading to offices on the top two floors. Fifty people were in the restaurant when the fire broke out at 4:30 a.m., all escaped unharmed. The responding firefighters; however, took quite a bit of punishment, with eleven firefighters being treated for smoke inhalation at the scene and five removed to Bellevue Hospital. The smoke was so bad the IRT subway by-passed the 50th Street station until the afternoon.”

4/11/1961 a Newark, NJ firefighter died while “he was operating at a four-alarm fire at the Englehorn’s meat packing plant on Avenue L when a wall collapsed on him. He died from his injuries a short time later.”

4/11/1994 two Memphis, TN firefighters “were killed when they became trapped and overcome by smoke during a fire on the ninth-floor of a high-rise building. Two civilians also died in the arson fire. The first firefighter became disoriented when he was caught in rapidly spreading fire conditions on the fire floor, burning him and causing his SCBA to malfunction. He found his way into a room on the ninth-floor where he was later discovered by other fire crews with his SCBA air depleted. The second firefighter, aware that the first firefighter was unaccounted for after several unsuccessful attempts to contact him by radio, left a safe stairwell where he had been attempting to fix a problem with his own SCBA. Investigators believe he was trying to locate the missing firefighter. He became entangled in fallen cable TV wiring within a few feet of the stairwell; and died of smoke inhalation after depleting his SCBA supply. A Memphis Fire Department investigation found many violations of standard operating procedures by companies on the scene, including crews taking the elevator to the fire floor, problems with the incident command system and coordination of companies, operating a ladder pipe with crews still on the fire floor, and a failure of personnel, including the two victims, to activate their PASS devices.”

4/11/2006 a Franklin Township, NJ firefighter “was performing search and rescue operations when he became trapped in the basement at a residential structure fire. He was rescued approximately 90 minutes afterwards. He was transported to the hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.”

4/11/2010 a Sackets Harbor, NY firefighter died while working a 20 x 60-foot oxygen limiting silo containing approximately 20 feet of high moisture corn. The fire may have been caused by embers from an earlier barn fire. Upon arrival, firefighters found a silo with bottom and top doors open, light smoke, and burning embers visible inside the bottom of the silo. They formed a plan to close all silo doors and introduce carbon dioxide to smother the fire. He climbed to the top of the silo using a ladder chute attached to the silo. He closed and latched the doors at the top of the silo, reported the completion of his task by radio, and began to climb back down the ladder. An explosion occurred, and he was thrown 20-30 feet to the ground.”

4/11/1996 a fire at terminal of the Düsseldorf Airport killed seventeen, hospitalized sixty-two people and burned for six hours. The fire started in a void space above the ground floor ceiling and spread to many areas on the first, second, and third floors.

4/11/1926 the tanker Gulf of Venezuela explosion killed twenty-five in Port Arthur, Texas; at the time of the explosion the 4,276 ton register tanker that had a capacity of 85,000 barrels, “was being loaded with a full cargo of high test gasoline and only ten minutes more time would have been required to finish the pumping on of the cargo.”

4/11/1921 Iowa imposed the first state cigarette tax

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

Pages

Subscribe to Volunteer Mobile Emergency Response Unit -- rehabsector.org aggregator - Fire Service