Fire Service

FAA to investigate small plane’s hard landing in Millard ball field

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 01/25/2018 - 08:53

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) — FAA inspectors are investigating what caused a small plane to hard land in a Millard ball field Wednesday afternoon.

Officials got word of the hard landing at Anderson ball field near 137th and Millard Avenue around 2:20 p.m.

6 News has learned the single-engine plane is owned by Oracle Aviation. An Oracle spokesperson told 6 News a student pilot and his flight instructor were inside the plane. They were returning to Millard Airport from a 2 to 3 hour cross country training flight. Both the instructor and his student were unharmed and walked away from the landing.

Jim Bolamperti was working in the area when the low-flying plane caught his attention. He told 6 News: “I look up and he’s just barely clearing those treetops. And it sounded like he was clipping some of them. And then I heard some other loud noises which might have been him hitting that wire, there. I ran over here and sure enough there he is – right up there against the fence.”

The circumstances of the incident remain under investigation by the F.A.A.

The F.A.A. is also investigating an incident last Saturday in which engine trouble forced a small plane, also owned by Oracle Aviation, to land in a field near 144th and Giles Road. A flight instructor and student were also involved in Saturday’s incident. They were both unharmed.

http://www.wowt.com/content/news/Report-of-small-plane-down-470950623.html

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Thu, 01/25/2018 - 08:51

28 Years ago today: On 25 January 1990 an Avianca Boeing 707 crashed near Cove Neck while approaching New York-JFK following fuel exhaustion; killing 73 out of 158 occupants.

Date: Thursday 25 January 1990 Time: 21:34 Type: Boeing 707-321B Operator: Avianca Registration: HK-2016 C/n / msn: 19276/592 First flight: 1967 Total airframe hrs: 61196 Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT3D-3B Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 9 Passengers: Fatalities: 65 / Occupants: 149 Total: Fatalities: 73 / Occupants: 158 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Cove Neck, NY (   United States of America) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Rionegro/Medellín-José María Córdova Airport (MDE/SKRG), Colombia Destination airport: New York-John F. Kennedy International Airport, NY (JFK/KJFK), United States of America Flightnumber: AV052

Narrative:
Avianca Flight AV052 (Bogotá – Medellin – New York-JFK) took off from Medellin at 15:08 with approx. 81000 lb of fuel on board. When arriving near New York, the aircraft had to enter 3 holding patterns. The first for 19 minutes over Norfolk, the second for 29 minutes over New Jersey, and the third pattern over the CAMRN intersection for 29 minutes. Over CAMRN the aircraft descended from FL140 to FL110. At 20:44:43, while holding at CAMRN for 26 minutes, the New York (NY) ARTCC radar controller advised AVA052 to expect further clearance at 21:05. At that moment the Avianca crew advised ATC that they could only hold for 5 more minutes and that their alternate Boston couldn’t be reached anymore due to the low state of fuel. The flight left the holding pattern at 20:47 and the crew contacted the New York TRACON (Terminal Radar Approach Control) who guided AV052 for a runway 22L ILS approach. On finals, at 21:15 the crew contacted JFK Tower and they were cleared to land four minutes later.
Due to the bad weather (300 feet ceiling, 400 m visibility, RVR – runway Visual Range of 2400 feet and wind shear of ca. 10 kt) the crew had to carry out a missed approach at 21:23. ATC vectored the crew for another approach. About 21:32, at 12 miles SE of JFK Airport, engines number 3 and 4 ran down. Shortly afterwards followed by the remaining two. At 21:34, heading 250° and flaps at 14° and gear up, the aircraft impacted on a hillside in a wooded residential area on the north shore of Long Island. The starboard side of the forward fuselage impacted and fractured the wooden deck of a residential home.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The failure of the flight crew to adequately manage the airplane’s fuel load, and their failure to communicate an emergency fuel situation to air traffic control before fuel exhaustion occurred. Contributing to the accident was the flight crew’s failure to use an airline operational control dispatch system to assist them during the international flight into a high-density airport in poor weather. Also contributing to the accident was inadequate traffic flow management by the FAA and the lack of standardized understandable terminology for pilots and controllers for minimum and emergency fuel states. The Safety Board also determines that windshear, crew fatigue and stress were factors that led to the unsuccessful completion of the first approach and thus contributed to the accident.”

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Cook County House Fire Ruled Arson

Cook County House Fire Ruled Arson
Categories: Fire Service

Caught on camera: Fire engine burns on I-74 in Illinois

Statter 911 - Wed, 01/24/2018 - 23:39

Reserve engine from Normal Fire Department returning from shop

The post Caught on camera: Fire engine burns on I-74 in Illinois appeared first on Statter911.

Categories: Fire Service

SUV CRASHES INTO CT FIREHOUSE

Firefighter Close Calls - Wed, 01/24/2018 - 19:16

Just before a Jeep Cherokee crashed into their Greenwich firehouse today, several firefighters had left the room closest to the impact.

Deputy Chief Tom Nixon says bricks and debris shot through the room seconds later.

The front of a Jeep Cherokee smashed through a brick wall and came to rest inside a lieutenants office at the Glenville Volunteer Fire Company.

The driver suffered a medical problem before the crash. The firefighters are also EMT’s, they got the driver out of the vehicle and cared for him until he was taken to the hospital.

“As the vehicle came across the front ramp, there is a monument in front that had a bell,” Nixon said He drove through the monument and the masonry base. It is pretty much destroyed.”

The firehouse was found to be sound, and remained open.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

Today is Wednesday the 24th of January, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 01/24/2018 - 09:35

Just a few articles today, but they’re all important, so take a look!

Be safe out there…

Tom

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TIA to NFPA 407 – Standard for Aircraft Fuel Servicing – 2017 Edition

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 01/24/2018 - 09:33

NFPA® 407

Standard for Aircraft Fuel Servicing

2017 Edition

Reference: 5.1.10, 6.1.10.1, 6.1.10.2, 8.1.10.1 and 8.1.10.2

TIA 17-1

(SC 17-12-20 / TIA Log #1339)

Pursuant to Section 5 of the NFPA Regulations Governing the Development of NFPA Standards, the National Fire

Protection Association has issued the following Tentative Interim Amendment to NFPA 407, Standard for Aircraft

Fuel Servicing, 2017 edition. The TIA was processed by the Technical Committee on Aircraft Fuel Servicing, and

was issued by the Standards Council on December 6, 2017, with an effective date of December 26, 2017.

A Tentative Interim Amendment is tentative because it has not been processed through the entire standards-making

procedures. It is interim because it is effective only between editions of the standard. A TIA automatically becomes

a public input of the proponent for the next edition of the standard; as such, it then is subject to all of the procedures

of the standards-making process.

  1. Revise 5.1.10 to read as follows:

5.1.10 Fire Protection. At least one fire extinguisher, with a minimum rating of 8040-B:C, and a

minimum capacity of 9.0 kg (20 lb) of dry chemical agent shall be provided at each fueling vehicle

loading position or rack.

  1. Revise 6.1.10.1 and 6.1.10.2 to read as follows:

6.1.10 Fire Protection.

6.1.10.1 Each aircraft fuel servicing tank vehicle shall have two listed fire extinguishers, each having

a rating of at least of 8040-B:C and a minimum capacity of 9.0 kg (20 lb) of dry chemical agent, with

one extinguisher mounted on each side of the vehicle.

6.1.10.2 One listed fire extinguisher having a rating of at least 8040-B:C and a minimum capacity of

9.0 kg (20 lb) of dry chemical agent shall be installed on each hydrant fuel servicing vehicle or cart.

  1. Revise 8.1.10.1 and 8.1.10.2 to read as follows:

8.1.10 Fire Protection.

8.1.10.1 Each facility shall have a minimum of one fire extinguisher with a rating of at least 8040-

B:C and a minimum capacity of 9.0 kg (20 lb) of dry chemical agent located at the dispenser.

8.1.10.2 At least one fire extinguisher with a rating of at least 8040-B:C and a minimum capacity of

9.0 kg (20 lb) of dry chemical agent shall be provided at each emergency fuel shutoff control.

Issue Date: December 6, 2017

Effective Date: December 26, 2017

(Note: For further information on NFPA Codes and Standards, please see www.nfpa.org/docinfo)

Copyright © 2017 All Rights Reserved

NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION

 

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Active Shooter & NFPA Input (The Secret List)

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 01/24/2018 - 09:26

All,

Yet another active shooter at a school-this time in Kentucky.

HERE is the radio traffic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3XVqVaIkxc&feature=em-uploademail

FIRE CHIEFS, FIREFIGHTERS & ACTIVE SHOOTERS:

Additionally, if you were unable to previously listen in, here is an excellent free webinar replay that featured Fire Chiefs from Texas, Maryland and New York discussing their active shooter/LODD events …it is well worth checking out:

http://info.lexipol.com/fire-active-shooter-sl

And now….the NFPA is working on several documents related to ACTIVE SHOOTER and the FIRE SERVICE response. Both documents are open for public input with 3000 closing on 2/23 and 451 on 3/8.  They need input from the fire service as they build out these documents.

3000 is being fast tracked due to the emergent nature and need for the information within and the fact that active shooter/hostile events continue to increase in frequency.  It is not a large metro problem either…as we have seen this morning-and previously.

HERE are the links-please take a look and provide the NFPA with your feedback:

www.nfpa.org/451

www.nfpa.org/3000

Here is another chance to give the NFPA feedback prior to a document becoming a working standard.

Don’t miss out.

Take Care. be careful. Pass it On.

BillyG

The Secret List 1/23/2018-1234 Hours

www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

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NTSB Reschedules Meeting on Uncontained Engine Failure

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 01/24/2018 - 09:24

The NTSB has rescheduled for Jan. 30 a meeting to determine the probable cause of the Oct. 28, 2016, American Airlines flight 383 uncontained engine failure.  The meeting had originally been scheduled for Jan. 23 but was cancelled due to the lapse in appropriations.

The Boeing 767-300 experienced an uncontained failure of the right, GE CF6-80C2B6 engine during the take-off roll about 6,550 feet from the runway threshold of Chicago O’Hare International Airport’s runway 28R. The plane came to a full stop about 9,255 feet from the runway threshold.

One passenger received serious injuries during the evacuation and the aircraft was substantially damaged by the resultant fire.

WHAT:  National Transportation Safety Board meeting for the Oct. 28, 2016, American Airlines flight 383 uncontained engine failure at Chicago O’Hare International Airport.

WHEN:  Jan. 30, 2018, 9:30 a.m.  Media attending the meeting are asked to be in place not later than 9:15 a.m.

WHERE:  NTSB Boardroom and Conference Center, 429 L’Enfant Plaza, SW, Washington, District of Columbia.

WHO:  National Transportation Safety Board members and investigative staff.

WEBCAST:  A link to a live webcast of the meeting will be available shortly before the start of the meeting at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/.

The accident investigation page, with links to previous news releases, reports and other information about the NTSB’s investigation, is available on our website at http://go.usa.gov/xN6bt.

NOTE: In the case of a partial shutdown of the federal government, the NTSB will provide information about the status of this meeting and other NTSB activities on its Twitter feed @NTSB_Newsroom.​​

https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/mr20180123.aspx

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 01/24/2018 - 09:20

52 Years ago today: On 24 January 1966 an Air India Boeing 707 crashed into the Mont Blanc while descending for Geneva; killing all 117 occupants.

Date: Monday 24 January 1966 Time: 07:02 UTC Type: Boeing 707-437 Operator: Air-India Registration: VT-DMN C/n / msn: 18055/200 First flight: 1961 Total airframe hrs: 16188 Engines:Rolls-Royce Conway 508 Crew: Fatalities: 11 / Occupants: 11 Passengers: Fatalities: 106 / Occupants: 106 Total: Fatalities: 117 / Occupants: 117 Airplane damage: Destroyed Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair) Location: Mont Blanc (   France) Crash site elevation: 4750 m (15584 feet) amsl Phase: En route (ENR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Beirut International Airport (BEY/OLBA), Lebanon Destination airport: Genève-Cointrin Airport (GVA/LSGG), Switzerland Flightnumber: 101

Narrative:
The Boeing 707, named “Kanchenjunga”, operated on a flight from Mumbai (Bombay) to London via Delhi, Beirut and Geneva. The flight to and takeoff from Beirut where routine, except for a failure of the no. 2 VOR. At 07:00 GMT the pilot reported reaching FL190 to Geneva ACC. He was told to maintain that flight level “unless able to descend VMC one thousand on top”. The pilot confirmed this and added that they were passing abeam Mont Blanc. The controller noted that the flight wasn’t abeam Mont Blanc yet and radioed “you have 5 miles to the Mont Blanc”, to which the pilot answered with “Roger.” Flight 101 then started to descend from FL190 until it struck the Mont Blanc at an elevation of 15585 feet (4750 m).

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The commission concluded that the most likely hypothesis was the following: a) The pilot-in-command, who knew on leaving Beirut that one of the VORs was unserviceable, miscalculated his position in relation to Mont Blanc and reported his own estimate of this position to the controller; the radar controller noted the error, determined the position of the aircraft correctly and passed a communication to the aircraft which, he believed, would enable it to correct its position.; b) For want of a sufficiently precise phraseology, the correction was mis-understood by the pilot who, under the mistaken impression that he had passed the ridge leading to the summit and was still at a flight level which afforded sufficient safety clearance over the top of Mont Blanc, continued his descent.”

The post Today in History appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

NTSB TO INVESTIGATE CA TESLA CRASH

Firefighter Close Calls - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 17:51

FROM STATTER911.com

While most of us slept early this (Tuesday) morning, the United States Secret Service arrested a man with a loaded gun near the White House grounds (details here). Following standard procedure, USSS called in bomb technicians from the Metropolitan Police Department (DC Police) and units from DC Fire and EMS to help check out the man’s vehicle.

When DC’s Office of Unified Communications (OUC or 911 center) dispatched the call at 2:56:34 a.m. to DC Fire and EMS they sent units to Madison Street and 8th Street, NW. That location is almost five miles from the White House complex. The call was actually for Madison Place and H Street, NW at the edge of Lafayette Park (Vermont Avenue also meets at that intersection).

As you will hear and see in the recording above via OpenMHZ, it took almost five minutes for OUC to fix the problem and send the correct units to the correct location. The second dispatch was at 3:01:03 a.m.

I understand that 8 and H can be confused. That’s why most competent call takers will ask, when hearing either 8 or H, something like, “Are you saying the number 8 or H as in Henry?”

In addition, I imagine that the context of the call – including the staging area that was sent to the mobile display terminals and that it was USSS calling – likely didn’t compute for a call at Madison Street and 8th Street, NW. Also, it would be interesting to know where OUC sent the police bomb technicians.

We will post any comments from OUC when they become available.

Regular readers of STATter911.com know that I’ve long been a critic of the 911 center in the Nation’s Capital. News reports in recent months give me the indication there are still serious issues at OUC almost three years after the last director was fired.

Things like call processing times, properly classifying EMS responses and sending help to the right location don’t seem to interest the local news media. But those familiar with public safety understand how key and well trained and properly function 911 center is to the well being of everyone. I will have more to say in the coming days.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

NTSB to investigate fire engine hit by Tesla in California

Statter 911 - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 16:04

NTSB will conduct field investigation after Monday morning crash

The post NTSB to investigate fire engine hit by Tesla in California appeared first on Statter911.

Categories: Fire Service

WA APPARATUS GETS SPIKES IN TIRES

Firefighter Close Calls - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 13:10

Poulsbo Fire engine was damaged by a metal spike in the road while responding to a call, but firefighters don’t think it was an accident after they found out that more spikes were found in North Kitsap County.

Poulsbo firefighters were driving to a fire in Bainbridge Island last week when they heard a clunk. It happened along Highway 305, about a half mile from the Agate Pass Bridge.

Shortly after hearing the loud noise, the firefighters were canceled on the call and returned to their station. Within minutes of arriving they discovered the front tire was flat.

“Initially, when they came back they thought we had three large nails,” said Poulsbo Fire Batt. Chief Chris Morrison. “Once a mechanic was able to remove the tire and get a closer look they found pieces of a spike and at least six holes in the tire.

“It’s a little disturbing to realize if somebody- we believe somebody maliciously did this because there were instances up in North Kitsap and Kingston where they found additional spikes,” said Morrison.

On Jan. 12, Kingston High School student Abby Rose posted on the North Kitsap Community Facebook page that she found spikes at the Kingston Cemetery. She says the metal pieces were buried in the gravel parking lot.

“Some very rude person decided it would be a great idea to make homemade spikes to pop people’s tires,” Rose wrote in the message. “I picked up every one I could find buried in the gravel.”

Meanwhile, in Poulsbo, the engine was out of service for about an hour as the tire was replaced. The cost to make the repairs was $1,300.

Morrison said even more concerning is knowing what could happen if more spikes are out there.

“Potentially, this could have caused damage to our crew and to the citizens if our engine would have went into oncoming traffic,” said Morrison. “Could have been devastating.”

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

DC 911 sends firefighters 5 miles away for call to help Secret Service near White House

Statter 911 - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 12:37

Fire & EMS called to check out vehicle of man arrested with loaded gun near White House grounds

The post DC 911 sends firefighters 5 miles away for call to help Secret Service near White House appeared first on Statter911.

Categories: Fire Service

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