Fire Service

The Latest: NTSB: Engine fan blade shows metal fatigue

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:13

The Latest on a plane making an emergency landing in Philadelphia (all times local):

9:55 p.m.

The National Transportation Safety Board says a preliminary examination of the blown jet engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia shows evidence of “metal fatigue.”

In a late night news conference, NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt said one of the engine’s fan blades was separated and missing. Sumwalt says the blade was separated at the point where it would come into the hub and there was evidence of metal fatigue.

One person was killed and seven others were injured after the twin-engine 737 blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window. The plane from New York to Dallas landed in Philadelphia.

Sumwalt says part of the engine covering was found in Bernville, Pennsylvania, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) west of Philadelphia.

___

7 p.m.

A bank executive and mother of two from New Mexico has been identified as the woman who died after a Southwest Airlines jet plane blew an engine and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window.

News of Jennifer Riordan’s death was first shared by the assistant principal of the Albuquerque Catholic school attended by her two children.

In an email to parents, assistant principal Amy McCarty wrote that “the family needs all the prayers we can offer.”

Riordan was a vice president of community relations for Wells Fargo bank. She was the wife of Michael Riordan, who served until recently as the chief operating officer for the city of Albuquerque.

The New Mexico Broadcasters Association on social media said Riordan was a graduate of the University of New Mexico and former board member.

___

6:20 p.m.

The head of Southwest Airlines says that there were no problems with a plane involved in a fatal emergency landing when it was inspected two days ago.

Chief executive Gary Kelly said at a news conference in Dallas Tuesday that there were no problems with the plane or its engine when it was inspected Sunday.

One person was killed and seven injured after the twin-engine 737 apparently blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window. The plane from New York to Dallas landed in Philadelphia.

Kelly says the plane has gone through 40,000 takeoffs and landings since it was delivered in July 2000. That includes 10,000 since its last overhaul.

He declined to identify the crew or the name of the dead passenger.

___

5:45 p.m.

The US transportation secretary is praising the pilots, crew and passengers for helping to prevent a far worse tragedy on a Southwest flight that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

One person was killed and seven injured after the twin-engine 737 apparently blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window.

The plane was headed from New York to Dallas with 149 people aboard when it detoured to Philadelphia.

Secretary Elaine Chao said her department is working with the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause and ensure the safety of the traveling public.

___

5 p.m.

A crew member on a plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia reported to air traffic controllers that a piece of the plane was missing and “someone went out.”

In the audio recording of the exchange, the crew member says the plane needed to slow down.

Photos posted by passengers showed a heavily damaged window near the damaged engine. Passengers reported seeing a woman being given medical attention on the plane.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt says that one person died in the accident. No details have been released on how the passenger died. Seven others were injured.

___

4:35 p.m.

The company that made the engine that blew apart on a Southwest Airlines jet says it is helping investigators figure out what went wrong.

CFM International said in a statement Tuesday that it sent technical experts to help the National Transportation Safety Board officials.

A passenger died after the left-side engine on a Southwest jet blew apart over Pennsylvania on Tuesday. The pilots made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

CFM is a joint venture of General Electric and France’s Safran.

The company says the type of engine on the Southwest plane is installed on more than 6,700 planes and has flown more than 350 million hours since its introduction in 1997.

The company says the engine has an outstanding safety and reliability record.

___

3:15 p.m.

A federal investigator says one person has been killed after a plane with engine failure made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt said Tuesday that the engine will be shipped for a detailed examination.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, as well as the fuselage and at least one window.

Philadelphia’s fire chief says that one person was taken to the hospital in critical condition and seven were treated for minor injuries.

___

2:35 p.m.

Philadelphia’s fire chief says that one person was taken to the hospital in critical condition after a Southwest Airlines plane made an emergency landing.

Philadelphia Fire Department Commissioner Adam Thiel (TEAL’) declined to release any additional details on the victim or their condition.

He says that seven other passengers were treated for minor injuries, but none had to be taken to the hospital.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, as well as the fuselage and at least one window.

Thiel says that there was a fuel leak and a small fire when firefighters arrived.

He didn’t release any additional details on the landing.

___

2 p.m.

A passenger aboard a Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia says at least one woman was taken to the hospital.

Amanda Bourman, of New York, said that the woman was taken off the plane by emergency medical workers Tuesday after the emergency landing around 11:20 a.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration says a flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, as well as the fuselage and at least one window.

Passenger Marty Martinez says a window exploded mid-air and posted photo of a damaged window and emergency oxygen masks dangling down.

It wasn’t clear if anyone else was injured.

___

1:50 p.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration says a flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing at Philadelphia’s airport after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, as well as the fuselage and at least one window.

Passenger Marty Martinez says a window exploded mid-air and posted photo of a damaged window and emergency oxygen masks dangling down.

The National Transportation Safety Board says it is taking over the investigation.

___

12:45 p.m.

A passenger on a Southwest Airlines plane says a window was damaged after a problem with its left engine and the plane made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

Southwest Airlines says there were 143 passengers and five crewmembers on board the flight Tuesday en route from New York’s La Guardia Airport to Dallas. The airline says something went awry and they landed at Philadelphia’s airport.

Passenger Marty Martinez says a window exploded mid-air and posted photo of a damaged window and emergency oxygen masks dangling down.

Passengers were seen walking off the plane on the tarmac at the airport and the left engine of the plane is damaged.

It wasn’t immediately clear if anyone was hurt.

Messages seeking comment from the Federal Aviation Administration weren’t immediately returned.

___

12:20 p.m.

Southwest Airlines says that one of its planes heading from New York’s LaGuardia Airport to Dallas’ Love Field landed safely in Philadelphia.

Tracking data from FlightAware.com shows the flight was heading west over New York’s southern tier when it abruptly turned toward Philadelphia.

Passengers were seen walking off the plane on the tarmac at the airport and the left engine of the plane is damaged.

It wasn’t immediately clear if anyone was hurt.

Messages seeking comment from the Federal Aviation Administration weren’t immediately returned.

____

12:15 p.m.

A Southwest Airlines plane has made an emergency landing at Philadelphia’s airport with what appears to be a damaged engine.

Passengers were seen walking off the plane on the tarmac at the airport.

Passengers on board posted on social media that the plane was en route from New York City to Dallas when something happened.

Messages seeking comment from the Federal Aviation Administration weren’t immediately returned.

Firefighters are on the scene but a spokeswoman couldn’t provide any details.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/the-latest-ntsb-engine-fan-blade-shows-metal-fatigue

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“It was the scariest experience”: Passenger describes engine failure on Southwest Airlines flight

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:11

By PETER MARTINEZ – CBS NEWS

At about 30,000 feet, something went terribly wrong with the left engine on Southwest Airlines Flight 1380 from New York to Dallas. The engine failure sent metal parts flying into the plane’s fuselage and blew out a passenger window, killing Jennifer Riordan, a married mother of two from New Mexico. The Boeing 737 with 149 people aboard made an emergency landing in Philadelphia as terrified passengers wore oxygen masks.

One of those passengers, Marty Martinez, joined CBSN over the phone to describe the harrowing account of happened just a few seats away from him.

“The engine exploded and when it exploded it broke a window in row 17,” Martinez said. “That window caused all the oxygen to go out … a woman was injured … there was blood everywhere.” He told CBSN that people were trying to help the woman as another tried to plug the broken window unsuccessfully. He described the woman as being older and she was taken off the plane once it landed.

He said that there was Wi-Fi on the plane so he was able to stream a Facebook video that showed him wearing an oxygen mask as the plane descended into Philly. 

“I thought I was cataloging the last moments of my existence,” Martinez said.

“First there was an explosion, and then almost immediately the oxygen masks come down and … the engine exploded then hit the window and busted it right open,” Martinez said. “It felt like the plane was freefalling … of course everyone is like freaking out, everybody is crying. It was the scariest experience.”

He added: “To see all the flight attendants crying, we knew it was something bad. Meanwhile I was on Facebook Live cranking out as many comments as I could thinking that was going to be the last few moments on this Earth.”

“All I could think about was family and my friends, my girlfriend, my brother, my sisters, my mom … it was terrifying,” Martinez said.

After the plane landed, he posted photos of the broken window and damaged engine.

“Everybody was crying and upset,” fellow passenger Amanda Bourman of New York told The Associated Press. “You had a few passengers that were very strong, and they kept yelling to people, you know, ‘It’s OK! We’re going to do this!'”

“I just remember holding my husband’s hand, and we just prayed and prayed and prayed,” Bourman said. “And the thoughts that were going through my head of course were about my daughters, just wanting to see them again and give them a big hug so they wouldn’t grow up without parents.”

The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane landed after the crew reported damage to one of the engines, along with the fuselage and at least one window. The NTSB sent a team of investigators to Philadelphia.

The flight was powered by CFM56-7B engines. An official told CBS News that CFM International has sent representatives to the scene to support the investigation.

The NTSB said Tuesday night that a preliminary examination found evidence of metal fatigue where an engine blade separated from the engine. Southwest announced that it is accelerating its inspections of CFM56 engines “out of an abundance of caution.”

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/southwest-airlines-flight-1380-emergency-landing-engine-failure-explosion-passengers-marty-martinez-2018-04-17/

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Flight Makes Safe Emergency Landing at Dulles After Losing Tire

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:07

By Julie Carey. Carissa Dimargo and Sophia Barnes

A Delta Express plane made a safe emergency landing at Dulles International Airport on Tuesday afternoon after losing a left front tire. 

Flight 5507 was en route to Richmond from LaGuardia Airport when the flight declared an emergency after the crew was notified they lost a wheel on takeoff, according to the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority.

Passengers said they got word halfway through the flight that they needed to make an emergency landing.

“You just try to keep a brave face,” said Mark Jenkins, who was on the final leg of a trip from England to Richmond.

“There wasn’t anything we could do,” said passenger Megan Oley. “Just sit and pray. That’s it.”

Anxiety surged as flight attendents prepared passengers for a potentially bumpy landing.

“They mentioned the brace for impact. I’m not gonna lie. My heart jumped a little bit,” another passenger, Joseph Zammito, said.

But the landing went relatively smoothly, passengers reported. 

“It was the smoothest landing that I’ve had for a couple of years,” Jenkins said.

The plane was inspected after landing at Dulles. It was missing a main gear wheel.

No damage fromt he landing was found, but the plane was listing at 45 degrees and was unable to taxi to the gate. Passengers were brought onto an airport shuttle, grabbed their bags and were boarded on a bus to Richmond.

Also Tuesday, a Dallas-bound Southwest Airlines flight made an emergency landing in Philadelphia. The jet’s left engine blew shortly after takeoff, NBC Philadelphia reported. A piece of shrapnel apparently flew into a window causing the glass to break. One person has died as a result.

https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Flight-Makes-Emergency-Landing-at-Dulles-After-Losing-Tire-480017093.html

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Mock plane crash drill set for Sonoma County airport

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:04

Emergency agencies from around Sonoma County and volunteer victims from area schools will be at the Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport Wednesday for a drill preparing for a plane crash.

The drill, from 10 a.m. to noon, will involve a simulated plane crash with 40‑50 victims. Firefighters, paramedics, a hazardous materials team, law enforcement, dispatchers and two helicopters will coordinate how to respond to a crash with a large number of victims.

Such trainings are required by the Federal Aviation Administration every three years.

The airport, northwest of Santa Rosa, is within the Rincon Valley Fire Protection District boundaries. Rincon Valley fire and airport officials are coordinating the drill.

“Having a commercial airport in our jurisdiction is a big responsibility and the public at large should feel safe in knowing that their first responders know how to deal with an aircraft emergency, whatever the scale,” said Rincon Valley Fire Chief Mark Heine in a statement.

Volunteer victims include Windsor High School and Santa Rosa Junior College students. They’ll be taken to Santa Rosa Memorial and Petaluma Valley hospitals to allow hospital staff to train for such a response.

You can reach Staff Writer Randi Rossmann at 707‑521-5412 or randi.rossmann@pressdemocrat.com.

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/8232844-181/mock-plane-crash-drill-set?sba=AAS

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 06:02

46 Years ago today: On 18 April 1972 an East African Vickers VC-10 jetliner overran the Addis Ababa runway after aborting takeoff due to a tyre failure; killing 43 out of 107 occupants.

Date: Tuesday 18 April 1972 Time: 09:39 Type: Vickers Super VC10-1154 Operator: East African Airways Corp. – EAAC Registration: 5X-UVA C/n / msn: 881 First flight: 1966-09-03 (5 years 8 months) Total airframe hrs: 18586 Engines:Rolls-Royce Conway 550 Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 11 Passengers: Fatalities: 35 / Occupants: 96 Total: Fatalities: 43 / Occupants: 107 Airplane damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: Addis Ababa-Bole Airport (ADD) (   Ethiopia) Phase: Takeoff (TOF) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Addis Ababa-Haile Selassie I International Airport (ADD/HAAB), Ethiopia Destination airport: Roma-Fiumicino Airport (FCO/LIRF), Italy Flightnumber: 720

Narrative:
East African Airways Flight EC-720 to London via Addis Ababa and Rome departed Nairobi at 06:55 hours. The flight to Addis Ababa was uneventful and the VC10 landed there at 08:23. During the transit stop at Addis Ababa, some freight was off-loaded together with 40 passengers. Fifteen passengers joined the flight and the airplane was refuelled. Start up clearance was given at 09:21 hours and the aircraft taxied out six minutes later via the eastern taxiway for takeoff on runway 07. The tower advised the aircraft that the wind was 5 knots and variable in direction. At 09:32 hours, as the aircraft was backtracking to the takeoff point, the pilot reported a number of dead birds on the runway. He requested that these birds be removed before the aircraft took off. A fire truck was dispatched to take care of this. The aircraft continued to backtrack down the runway and turned in the pad at the end. It then lined up on the runway and stopped a short distance from the threshold. At 09:38:40 hours, the tower cleared the aircraft for takeoff. Shortly after the aircraft had passed the mid-point of the runway, at or just below the V1 speed, the nose wheel ran over a steel jacking pad. This jacking pad belonged to a Cessna 185 that had departed 4:40 earlier. The pad punctured the right hand nose wheel tire. A loud bang was heard and severe vibration was felt on the flight deck. Almost immediately after the nose wheel tire had burst, the nose of the aircraft rose momentarily and then come down. The flight crew decided to abort the takeoff. The engines were throttled back and reverse thrust was selected. The aircraft continued down the runway, veering slightly to the right. Then the no.1 rear main tire burst. Just before the aircraft reached the end of the runway, it veered slightly to the left and ran approximately parallel to the centre line. After crossing a storm drain located at the end of the runway at right angles to the centre line, the aircraft became momentarily airborne as it left the lip of the embankment on which the 60 m stopway was laid. As it did so, the left outer wing of the aircraft struck a steel lattice tower forming part of the approach lighting system to runway 25. This ruptured the no. 1A fuel tank and the released fuel promptly ignited. Sixty metres beyond the end of the runway the aircraft fell heavily on to the lower ground 10.6 m below the runway level. It broke up immediately on impact and after sliding a short distance, came to rest and caught fire.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The accident was due to a partial loss of braking effort arising from incorrect re-assembly of part of the braking system, as a result of which the aircraft could not be stopped within the emergency distance remaining following a properly executed abandoned take-off procedure.”

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LARGE CA FIRE INJURES FIREFIGHTERS, DAMAGES MULTIPLE BUILDINGS AND CARS

Firefighter Close Calls - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 17:54

A firefighter suffered minor injuries and two residents were displaced when a third-alarm firedamaged four homes, five garages, two cars and several palm trees in Alhambra Monday night.

Alhambra Fire Battalion Chief Ed Guerrero estimated the cost of damages at $500,000. He said firefighters haven’t yet determined what started the blaze. Arson isn’t suspected.

The fire broke out Monday night behind two homes in the 300 block of South Hidalgo Avenue.

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Firefighters received a call of a garage fire at 5:22 p.m. When firefighters arrived, Guerrero said there were two garages and at least two palm trees on fire.

Guerrero said the wind contributed to the fire spreading to two homes on Commonwealth Avenue as well as two homes and a garage on South Cordova Street.

Authorities evacuated residents.

Guerrero said one firefighter complained of pain in his fingers but was not taken to a hospital.  He said two people whose Commonwealth Avenue home was damaged went to stay with friends.

About 60 firefighters knocked down the fire at around 6:30 p.m. Fire departments from Pasadena, San Gabriel, San Marino, South Pasadena and Monterey Park assisted Alhambra firefighters.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

Pre-arrival video with arson arrest in Lakeland, Florida

Statter 911 - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 16:41

There's a lot going on in this video

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Categories: Fire Service

Today is Tuesday the 17th of April, 2018

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 07:37

Here are the stories for today…

Be safe out there!

Tom

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USAF To Change Aircraft Rescue And Fire Fighting (ARFF) Standards

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 07:34

Settles Lawsuit With Airshow Pilot’s Family For $1.4 Million

The U.S. Air Force has settled a lawsuit with the family of Aerobatic Hall of Fame pilot Eddie Andreini who was fatally injured during a performance at Travis Air Force Base in 2014. 

The Aviation Law Monitor recount the accident, in which Andreini (pictured) was attempting an inverted ribbon cut, but impacted the runway and became trapped in the cockpit of his Stearman biplane. He was fatally injured in the post-accident fire.

Records show that it took nearly five minutes for firetrucks to arrive at the accident scene, and by that time, Andreini had already succumbed. The USAF denied liability, saying the firefighters had acted “by the book” and that the fire spread so fast that it would have been impossible to safe Andreini no matter how fast they would have arrived.

But the ALM reports that attorneys representing the family proved the USAF did not meet its ARFF standards. The trucks were more than a mile from the runway, and firefighters were not suited up and ready to respond during the show. The showed that the Air Force was not entitled to immunity from a lawsuit under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

As a result of the legal proceedings, the USAF says it will as standard operating procedure position fire trucks to have immediate access to the show line during air shows. Firefighters will also be dressed and ready to go whenever a performer is in the air.

The settlement with the family was reported to be in the amount of $1.4 million.

FMI: Original report

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Authorities identify man and woman killed in plane crash in Coshocton County

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 07:25

BLISSFIELD, Ohio (WSYX/WTTE) —

Authorities say a single-engine plane headed to Florida has crashed in rural Ohio, killing two people on board.

The crash happened around five miles west of Blissfield, in a wooded area of Coshocton County. The FAA said the plane was a BE33 Beechcraft Bonanza aircraft that was flying from Elyria, Ohio to Deland, Florida.

Authorities were informed that the plane had disappeared from radar, and someone in the area spotted the wreckage hours later. Local law enforcement told the FAA that two people were killed on board. The FAA has begun an onsite investigation to help determine the cause.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will lead the investigation per the FAA.

Ohio State Highway Patrol identified the victims as 67-year-old Edward Zezlina and his passenger 71-year-old Linda O’Brien.

The crash remains under investigation at this time.

http://abc6onyourside.com/news/local/faa-two-killed-in-coshocton-county-plane-crash

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Small plane lands on North Side San Antonio street

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 07:24

By Fares Sabawi

A small aircraft landed on a North Side street Monday afternoon after the pilot apparently missed a nearby runway. 

San Antonio Fire Capt. Kevin Koch said a couple in their 70s were trying to land the plane at Twin Oaks Airport around 3 p.m. when a wind gust lifted the plane past the runway. It ended  up in the 600 block of Heimer Road.

The plane had to make an emergency landing in the 600 block of Heimer Road Monday April 16, 2018.

The couple was not seriously injured but the woman was hospitalized after complaining of back pain. No one on the ground reported injuries.

The plane was partially on the sidewalk and caused damage to some fences. Though the damage to the plane was not extensive, Koch said the wing was bent and fuel was leaking from the aircraft.

A crane was brought in to remove the plane and it was placed back onto the runway, clearing the street, around 5 p.m.

FAA officials are investigating the incident.

This is the second incident involving a small plane in San Antonio in two days. On Sunday, the pilot of an experimental small-engine aircraft died after the plane crashed.

https://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/Small-plane-lands-on-North-Side-San-Antonio-street-12838823.php

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UNITED AIRLINES PLANE MAKES EMERGENCY LANDING AT DOVER AIR FORCE BASE

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 07:22

DOVER, Del. – A United Airlines flight made an emergency landing at Dover Air Force Base Monday night.

United Airlines 1559 was headed from Newark International Airport to Palm Beach International when the pilot declared an emergency due to a mechanical problem.

ABC News’ Jeffrey Cook reports, “The pilots of #UA1559 reported ‘trouble with the elevator’ to air traffic controllers before landing at Dover Air Force Base. Such a problem would lead to controllability challenges. Hence the diversion to the long runways at the Air Force Base.”

According to officials, the plane, a Boeing 737, landed safely at Dover Air Force Base around 7:20 p.m.

United Airlines issued the following statement following the landing:

Our maintenance team is inspecting the aircraft and we are working to get our customers to Palm Beach as soon as possible.

Passengers eventually did make it to their Florida destination.

http://6abc.com/amp/commercial-flight-makes-emergency-landing-at-dover-air-force-base/3353457/

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60+ firefighters battle fire at Springs Airport

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 07:20

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) – A three-alarm fire at the Colorado Springs Airport grounded all flights and forced the entire building to evacuate.

It took firefighters more than four hours to contain the flames, which broke out on the roof on the west side of the airport. The fire was declared fully contained just after 3 a.m.

“I was just downstairs working at Avis Budget [car rentals],” employee Tony Frost told 11 News. “All of a sudden some guy runs downstairs screaming that there’s a fire. I thought it was a joke at first.”

“There was an announcement that just said, ‘Colorado Springs Airport, evacuate the airport now,'” said Dannika Roggie, who was picking someone up at the airport.

Frost, Roggie and everyone else in the airport immediately cleared the building, while inbound travelers found themselves suddenly trapped on their planes.

“We ended up sitting on the tarmac for about three hours,” passenger Maddison Russell told 11 News.

Lt. Doug Pape with the Colorado Springs Fire Department said firefighters could see flames shooting from the roof before they even got to the airport.

“As we were approaching, we could see the flames from several miles off … there was quite a bit of smoke production.”

More than 60 firefighters battled the blaze. Pape described the firefight.

“We set up our aerial ladder and attacked the fire from the outside. Then we sent crews to the inside to make sure we didn’t have any fire to the inside of the building.”

He said firefighters were met with several obstacles as they worked to extinguish the fire.

“Challenges was water supply. We had to do relay pumping to aerial operations … locating the fire, finding the extent and the nature of the fire, and just access was probably the biggest issue. We have water supply, but there wasn’t any right in front of us like there would be for a house fire, so we had to have a fairly long lay-in. That delayed a little bit, the operations of getting water on the fire.”

Pape said the fire was in the insulation of the roofing material, which can sometimes hide smoldering areas.

“To make sure that we were completely out on such a large structure, we took our time making sure we had no re-ignition,” he said of why it took crews so long to get the fire out.

Investigators are now trying to figure out what started the fire. Airport spokesperson Aidan Ryan said the structure sustained smoke and water damage but did not elaborate on the extent of damage.

The airport said in a Facebook post that all airport operations are closed while staff awaits a safety evaluation from the Colorado Springs Fire Department. Employees are told to report to the field shop for their regularly scheduled shift.

All flights in and out of the airport are canceled Tuesday. To reschedule your flight or for more info on Tuesday’s flight schedule, call the following numbers:

United: 877-624-3653
Frontier: 303-481-2550
Delta: 800-221-1212
American: 800-446-7834

Twenty-five flights are affected, according to the airport. It’s unknown at this time if this mass cancellation will extend into Wednesday too.

http://www.kktv.com/content/news/Fire-forces-cancellation-of-flights-at-COS-Airport-479960393.html

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Long-Term FAA Reauthorization Bill Introduced In The U.S. House

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 07:18

Bipartisan Bill Focuses On Jobs, Airports And Infrastructure

Leaders of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee on Friday introduced a bipartisan FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 (H.R. 4), a five-year bill to reauthorize the programs of the FAA, provide long-term stability for the Nation’s aviation community, continue investment in U.S. airports, and make necessary reforms to improve American competitiveness and safety in aviation.

H.R. 4 was introduced in the House Friday by the entire bipartisan leadership of the Committee and its six subcommittees, including Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA), Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Aviation Subcommittee Chairman Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ), and Aviation Subcommittee Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA).

The FAA Reauthorization Act:

  • Keeps our Nation in the lead in aviation by putting American jobs, American innovation, and the traveling public first.
  • Cuts Washington red tape so that our manufacturers can get products to market on time, stay competitive globally, and continue to employ millions of Americans.
  • Encourages American innovation in aviation technologies to promote a stronger American workforce.
  • Ensures that our airport infrastructure connects our businesses and increasing number of air travelers to the world.
  • Gives the American traveling public a better flight experience.
  • Ensures our system remains as safe as possible for the American traveler and addresses factors related to recent incidents.

“Our aviation system is essential to our economy and to the American way of life,” said Chairman Shuster. “This bill provides many important reforms that will help U.S. manufacturers and job creators lead in a very competitive global marketplace. This legislation ensures long-term investment and stability in aviation infrastructure for America’s large, small, and rural communities, and it addresses issues to help maintain the safety of our system.”

“I’m glad we finally had the opportunity to come together and introduce a bipartisan, long-term FAA reauthorization bill – a bill that gives the FAA long-term funding it needs to do its job and includes mandates to improve aviation safety, to continue leading the world in aviation research and innovation, and to make needed and targeted reforms to critical aviation programs. This bill will also enhance the air travel experience for the hundreds of millions of U.S. passengers who take to the skies each year,” said Ranking Member DeFazio.

“This FAA authorization is the culmination of years of hearings and listening sessions to solicit input from aviation stakeholders, commercial passengers, general aviation pilots and our colleagues,” said Chairman LoBiondo. “In the truest sense, this legislation represents bipartisan cooperation and compromise to advance the Nation’s aviation interests and safety in the skies. Moving a five-year FAA bill with broad bipartisan support through the Congress and to the President’s desk is my top priority as I wind down my Chairmanship of the Subcommittee.”

“Aviation supports more than 30,000 jobs in Washington state and long-term FAA reauthorization will provide stability and economic growth in the Pacific Northwest,” said Ranking Member Larsen. “With this continued commitment to bipartisanship, the difference between the House and the Senate bills is now merely inches apart. I am pleased Congress can move forward on addressing the long-term infrastructure, workforce and aviation safety needs to benefit communities across the U.S.”

The introduced bill also includes the bipartisan Disaster Recovery Reform Act (DRRA), legislation that received overwhelming support in the House in December as part of an emergency disaster aid package. The DRRA provisions of the bill will help communities better prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate against disasters of all kinds.

The DRRA provides broad reforms to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in particular increasing the federal emphasis on predisaster planning and mitigation to reduce the potential for future loss of life and help reduce the rising costs of disasters.

“The bipartisan DRRA will ensure our communities are more resilient, build better, and build smarter. Ultimately, because of this commonsense, proactive approach to mitigating the impacts of disasters before they strike and not waiting until afterwards to simply pick up the pieces, this legislation will save lives, save property, and save taxpayer dollars,” said Chairman Shuster.

Drone attorney Jonathan Rupprecht has done a deep dive into the reauthorization bill. He notes that the legislation “Tells the Comptroller General of the United States to do a study on appropriate fee mechanisms to recover the costs of “the regulation and safety oversight of unmanned aircraft and unmanned aircraft systems” and “the provision of air navigation services to unmanned aircraft and unmanned aircraft systems.”

Other items of note include a directive for the DOT IG to “conduct a study on ‘the regulation and oversight of the low-altitude operations of small unmanned aircraft and small unmanned aircraft systems’ and ‘appropriate roles and responsibilities of Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments in regulating and overseeing the operations of small unmanned aircraft in airspace 400 feet above ground level and below.’

It also amends Section 336, adding that:

An aircraft cannot be considered a protected model aircraft if it flies over or within 500ft laterally of a facility that operates amusement rides for the general public, unless authorized by the owner of the amusement facility.
Allows for flight instruction or educational flights, even if compensated, to be done in the protected model aircraft category.

There are also expanded definitions for a “Community-Based Organization” as it relates to model aircraft.

(Source: House Transportation Committee news release and Rupprecht Law Blog. Images from file)

FMI: transportation.house.govjrupprechtlaw.com/faa-reauthorization-act-of-2018

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Today in History

ARFF Working Group - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 07:16

54 Years ago today: On 17 April 1964 a Middle East Airlines Caravelle crashed off Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, killing all 49 occupants.

Date: Friday 17 April 1964 Time: 19:32 UTC Type: Sud Aviation SE-210 Caravelle III Operator: Middle East Airlines – MEA Registration: OD-AEM C/n / msn: 23 First flight: 1960 Crew: Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7 Passengers: Fatalities: 42 / Occupants: 42 Total: Fatalities: 49 / Occupants: 49 Airplane damage: Damaged beyond repair Location: 19 km (11.9 mls) SSE of Dhahran International Airport (DHA) (   Saudi Arabia) Phase: Approach (APR) Nature: International Scheduled Passenger Departure airport: Beirut International Airport (BEY/OLBA), Lebanon Destination airport: Dhahran International Airport (DHA/OEDR), Saudi Arabia Flightnumber: ME444

Narrative:
Flight ME 444 departed Beirut (BEY) at 17:09 UTC and climbed to its cruising altitude of FL300. At 19:04 the aircraft reported to Bahrain Control that it was estimating Dhahran (DHA) at 19:28, and was cleared to descend to reach FL50 over the Dhahran beacon. At 19:06 weather information was reported to flight 444, which read a NNE/10 knots wind, gusting to 16, and 0,5nm visibility (in a sandstorm). At 19:26 the pilot reported estimating the Dhahran NDB in two minutes. At 19:28 it contacted Dhahran and reported “5 000 feet descending” and was cleared for an ADF approach. The controller requested the crew to report at 4000 feet and outbound at 2000 feet. One minute later it reported leaving 4000 feet and at 19:30 passing 2500 feet and turning inbound. It was then cleared to final approach and requested to report reaching minimum and runway in sight. At approximately 19:32 a short loud transmission noise was recorded by the Tower. No further message was received from the flight. It was subsequently found that the aircraft struck the sea at the completion of the procedure turn 4 NM off shore and 10 NM south of Dhahran Airport.
The investigation team concluded that there was no mechanical failure that could have caused the accident. Several theories were investigated, a.o. erroneous radio altimeter indications as a result of the sandstorm (these effects have been proven in tests done by Air France), but the team was not able to prove any of those theories.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: “The probable cause of this accident can not be ascertained.”

The post Today in History appeared first on ARFFWG | ARFF Working Group.

TWO ARLINGTON, TX FIREFIGHTERS INJURED AT GAS LEAK

Firefighter Close Calls - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 18:50

Two Arlington firefighters and an Arlington Water Utilities crew member were injured while responding to a gas leak Sunday afternoon in central Arlington.

All three were transported to Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas. The extent of their injuries is not known.

Arlington Water Utilities crews were repairing a water line leak at the intersection of Ditto Avenue and Dugan Street, according to Arlington Fire Department spokesman Mike Joiner. As they cleared asphalt to begin excavation, they hit an Atmos gas line.

Joiner said the crews stopped work and contacted Atmos Energy and the Arlington Fire Department.

As excess water was being pumped out so repairs to the gas line could begin, gas ignited.

The Arlington Fire Department and Atmos crews worked to mitigate the effects of the gas leak.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

CARY, IL FIREFIGHTER INJURED AT HOUSE FIRE

Firefighter Close Calls - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 18:42

Two cats were treated for smoke inhalation and a firefighter was injured following a house fire in Cary Friday night, authorities said. All three tenants inside the home at 203 E. Pearl Street were able to safely get out before fire crews arrived at the scene at about 9:34 p.m. Heavy smoke was coming from the residence when fire crews first arrived at the scene and they were able to rescue the two cats from inside the home, according to a news release.

Firefighters used a special oxygen mask to treat the animals at the scene and after receiving the treatment, both cats’ conditions improved, according to the fire department press release.

Meanwhile, a Cary Fire Protection District firefighter was also treated at the scene by paramedics after receiving a minor laceration to his head when he was struck by a tool, authorities said. No other injuries were reported in the blaze.

Firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes of arriving at the scene. The basement was severely damaged by the fire and there was smoke and water damage throughout the residence, according to the news release.

The home is currently uninhabitable, fire officials said, and arrangements were made for the tenants to stay at a hotel following the blaze.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

NH FIREFIGHTERS INURED AT APARTMENT FIRE

Firefighter Close Calls - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 18:40

Winds fanned the flames of an apartment fire on Merrimack Street early Monday that forced the evacuation of several families from their homes as fire threatened to encroach on nearby residences.

RELATED STORY: Total Loss: Official report on cause and damage by MFD

The fire, which went to the equivalent of a fourth alarm, was reported early Monday morning around 5 a.m. at 368-374 Merrimack St. Fire officials evacuated buildings and shut down traffic from Laurel to Manchester Street, and Beech Street to Wilson Street.

Fire rips through Merrimack Street apartment building Monday. Photo/Jeffrey Hastings

District Fire Chief Hank Martineau said fire crews encountered heavy fire upon arrival on the second and third floors of the three-story building.

“Fire was blowing out all the windows on the second floor,” Martineau said.

Due to the volume of the fire crews were unable to reach the third floor, and had to back off, Martineau said. Initially some residents thought there were still occupants on the third floor, but Martineau said they were able to confirm that occupants of apartment 6 were safe, and staying with friends.

“Everyone’s accounted for,” Martineau said.

Wind conditions and cold, as well as slippery roadways due to persistent freezing rain added a challenge for fire crews, Martineau said, and a brief issue with water pressure was resolved. Manchester Water Works was also at the scene. Also a challenge was access for the ladder truck.

“It’s a tight space, but we were able to make access from Manchester Street to the rear of the building where the fire extended,” Martineau said.

Based on initial investigation, it appears smoking was the cause.

“A resident told the fire marshal he was smoking in bed on the second floor,” Martineau said.

Early on there was exposure to a residence on the right side of the building, but crews were able to contain the fire and prevent it from spreading.

Two firefighters were injured, Martineau said. One suffered an injury to the side of his face when he was hit with an object, and another firefighter passed out at the scene. That firefighter was transported for treatment at a nearby hospital.

Manchester Police assisted the fire department with road closures – a segment of Manchester Street will remain closed  for the next several hours. The American Red Cross is assisting at least two adults and two children displaced by the blaze.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

CA FIREFIGHTER INJURED AT BRUSH FIRE

Firefighter Close Calls - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 18:34

A firefighter was injured Sunday while battling a brush fire that burned about five acres of Talbert Regional Park in Costa Mesa, according to fire officials.

The fire broke out shortly before 11 a.m. near the BMX track at 1299 Victoria St.

Officials are investigating the cause of the blaze.

Thirty to 40 firefighters from Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Newport Beach and the Orange County Fire Authority worked for about three hours to control the fire. One firefighter suffered a minor injury, officials said.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

2 OTTAWA CANADA FIREFIGHTERS INJURED IN STAIR COLLAPSE

Firefighter Close Calls - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 18:32

Two Ottawa firefighters fell through the floor of a home in Stittsville while battling a blaze on Monday, sparking an emergency rescue operation to pull the pair from the fire.

A spokeswoman with Ottawa Fire Services said the two were part of a rescue inside the home on 24 Snowberry Way between McCuaig Drive and Henry Goulburn Way around 12:30 p.m.

The men were helping pull one of the home’s residents from the fire. The resident, a man who has not been identified, was treated at the scene for smoke inhalation.

A short while later, the floor of the home gave out, causing two of the firefighters to fall. Emergency crews responded and pulled the pair from the blaze. Crews were continuing to fight the fire as of 2 p.m.

The two firefighters were taken to hospital. They were in stable condition.

Categories: Fire Service, Safety

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