Syndicated Columnists

Apply best-available data to active shooter incident planning, training

Syndicated Columnists - Fri, 06/08/2018 - 09:03
A Broward County Sheriff's Office captain refused to allow Coral Springs Fire-Rescue paramedics, deploying as a Rescue Task Force, entry into Marjory Stoneman Douglas (Parkland, Fla.) High School. Deputy Chief Michael McNally wrote in a recently released incident report, "The [BSO] incident commander advised me, 'She would have to check.’ "After several minutes, I requested once ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Inside EMS: Using CPAP to treat CHF patients

Syndicated Columnists - Thu, 06/07/2018 - 15:43
Download this podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed In this Inside EMS Podcast episode, co-hosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss using CPAP to treat CHF patients. How does it work" What are the benefits and what does the treatment look like" Learn more about the EMS1 Academy and schedule a free demo.
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Engine Co. EMS; the frequent flyer

Michael Morse - Rescuing Providence - Thu, 06/07/2018 - 08:52

“. . . The good news? These patients, more often than not, will survive our interventions–or lack thereof.

The bad news? One of these days, and we never know which one, they will die. Their demise may just happen during one of your calls to assist them. It might happen shortly after you obtained a signed refusal, or a day after you transferred care to the ambulance staff without a proper evaluation or protocol-based treatment. . .”

http://www.fireengineering.com/articles/2018/06/engine-company-ems-frequent-flyers.html

 

 

Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Preparing fire-based EMS for the 'silver tsunami'

Syndicated Columnists - Thu, 06/07/2018 - 08:27
Fire-based EMS systems are experiencing ever-increasing workloads – and this is only the beginning. Drawing from generational demographics, Medicare data and decades of experience managing large EMS systems, Bruce J. Moeller, Ph.D., adjunct professor, University of Florida, will address strategies to manage the silver tsunami in fire-based EMS in a session at Fire-Rescue Med, June 11-13, 2018 ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Q&A: How is the opioid epidemic impacting first responders?

Syndicated Columnists - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 13:00
By Kerri Hatt, EMS1 Senior Editor More Americans now die from opioid overdose than from breast cancer. The epidemic costs more than $500 billion a year and is notably negatively impacting U.S. life expectancy. As opioid overdose death rates rise across the nation, communities are implementing new strategies and collaborations. Widespread dissemination of naloxone – from local pharmacies, to families ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

20 Clues that your Dad (granddad) is a firefighter

Michael Morse - Rescuing Providence - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 14:20

20 CLUES THAT YOUR DAD IS A FIREFIGHTER

You’re a firefighter and let’s face it, you’re a little different from the rest. As the years go by, and the experiences pile up, parts of “the job” begin to define who you are.

It doesn’t happen all at once, and most of the time you can’t even notice it. Your kids, not knowing the pre-firefighter you, simply accept you the way you are.

Ask a kid how he knows his dad is a firefighter and these are some of the things you might hear:

1) HE SAYS WEIRD THINGS LIKE “STAND BY,” OR “ROGER THAT,” INSTEAD OF “WAIT A SEC,” OR “OKAY,” LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE.

2) EVERYTHING IS IN ITS PLACE…OR ELSE!

3) SOMETIMES, HE’S JUST NOT THERE, BUT HE ALWAYS COMES BACK.

4) NO MATTER WHERE HE IS, HE ALWAYS KNOWS HOW TO GET OUT FAST.

5) HE HAS MORE FIRE DEPARTMENT RELATED T-SHIRTS THAN DRESS SHIRTS.

6) HE WEARS RED SUSPENDERS TO HOLD HIS PANTS UP.

7) EVERY TIME THERE’S A FIRE ON TV HE SHOUTS AT THE SCREEN, “THAT’S NOT THE WAY IT IS! YA CAN’T SEE NUTHIN!” EVERY TIME.

8) THERE’S ALWAYS A PICK-UP TRUCK IN THE DRIVEWAY.

9) HE MAY NOT BE A BETTER COOK THAN YOUR MOM, BUT HE MAKES BETTER STUFF!

10) HE TELLS THE BEST STORIES.

11) SOMEHOW, HE’S ALWAYS IN THE THICK OF THINGS.

12) HE BACKS HIS PICK-UP INTO THE GARAGE.

13) SOMETIMES, FOR NO REASON YOU CAN THINK OF, HE WAKES YOU UP AND GIVES YOU A HUG, THEN GOES TO BED WITHOUT SAYING A WORD.

14) YOU CELEBRATE BIRTHDAYS AND HOLIDAYS THE DAY BEFORE, OR AFTER THE ACTUAL DAY.

15) EVERYBODY BORROWS TOOLS FROM YOUR GARAGE.

16) IF HE ISN’T ON HIS FEET, HE’S SLEEPING…AND HE COULD BE SLEEPING ANYWHERE!

17) ALL OF THE SMOKE DETECTORS IN YOUR HOUSE WORK.

18) HIS MOUSTACHE TICKLES.

19) OUT OF ALL OF YOUR FRIEND’S MOMS, YOUR MOM IS THE PRETTIEST.

20) IT’S FATHER’S DAY, AND HE’S NOT HOME!

So there you have it. Twenty ways your kids know that you’re a firefighter. I’m sure there are many more that I’m not even aware of. I kind of hope that some day, when I’m long gone, they’ll get together over a few beverages and tell some stories about their dad, the fireman.

by Michael Morse

Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Paid to vs Have to

EMScapades Cartoon - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:48
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Paid to vs Have to

EMScapades Cartoon - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:48
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

EMS is the first line of defense against spread of infectious diseases

Syndicated Columnists - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 14:44
By Keith Collins, alumni, Fire Science Management at American Military University Emergency services personnel play a vital role in maintaining public health. Not only are they the first to provide medical care during an emergency, they are also the first line of defense in identifying and helping prevent the spread of infectious diseases. During epidemics or pandemics such as recent breakouts of Zika ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Research Analysis: Airway management better with the bougie

Syndicated Columnists - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 08:39
Researchers at Hennepin County Medical Center and the University of Minnesota Department of Emergency Medicine recently published the results of the Bougie Use in Emergency Airway Management (BEAM) randomized clinical trial in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The BEAM trial compared intubations done in a Level I trauma center using a Macintosh blade, with and without a bougie ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

EMS Training, Response & Patient Outcomes

EMS Office Hours Podcast - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 10:37

We focus a lot on response in EMS. Your response coupled with your paramedic or EMT training can effect patient outcomes. 

Sometimes response is the focus without equal attention to training. Getting there is only part of what we do, yet is often the one marker that is looked at when it comes to a patients outcome.

This week we talk about EMS response, EMS call types, paramedic training and how they all reflect on patient outcomes.

Does an 8-10 minute response have a positive impact or is it better training and equipment?

Take a listen to this episode and be sure to click the Apple Link and leave me a quick rating or review. It only takes about 3 minutes but really helps the show.

 

 

Subscribe and Review on iTunes

The post EMS Training, Response & Patient Outcomes appeared first on .

Responding to a mass casualty incident is unimaginable

Syndicated Columnists - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 09:39
“No, you can’t imagine!” he shouted, betraying his claim that he was okay. What started as a friendly conversation had become more serious, as the real reason for the call poured out of him. He had read an article I had written about arming EMTs and paramedics, agreed with my belief that it would do more harm than good, and wanted to let me know. I probably wasn’t the first to ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Pace yourself

EMScapades Cartoon - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 09:19
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Pace yourself

EMScapades Cartoon - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 09:19
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

Captain Wishart

Michael Morse - Rescuing Providence - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 13:29

From Rescuing Providence, 2010 ish. The ” babe” just got sworn is as Captain, Providence, RI Fire Department. She has more lives to save, congratulations Captain Wishart!

Wisdom from the mouth of babes….

I dragged myself into Rescue 5’s office this morning, took the portable from Teresa and got ready to start another shift, this time looking forward to five o’clock so I could get back to Rescue 1 and start the countdown till 0700.

Every now and then a beacon of light enters my vision, so bright it’s nearly blinding. I fumble through my days, always waiting for a shift to end, a call to be over, another cycle in the books. I keep the future in mind always, at ten years I had ten to go, fifteen five more, now at eighteen two more and out, time to “enjoy my life.”

“I have no idea how I’m going to be able to do this for two more years,” I said to Teresa. We work the same shift, “C” Group, her in charge of Rescue 5, me at Rescue 1, Zack at Rescue 4, Doc Vinnacco at 3 and an Acting Captain at 2. We’ve worked together for seven or eight years now, the officers steady with a steady stream of Rescue Technicians coming and going. Some of the techs stick around, Terry’s partner John has been around for a while and doesn’t look to be going anywhere any time soon. Can’t say I blame him. Zack has Stephanie, almost a year now and holding steady. The six of us make a difficult job bearable, at times even fun.

“What if next week were your last?” asked Teresa, wanting to get home and get some rest but staying at work for a few extra minutes to talk some sense into somebody she cares about. “When you leave here you will never come back. A big part of your life will be over. Why would you want that to rush past you?”

“I don’t know.”

“You’re not ready to leave, you love it too much. Think about your friends in the station, the hospitals, even the patients. This is an amazing ride, slow down and enjoy every minute, who knows if you’ll even be alive in two years.”

I don’t think she is even thirty years old. I had been a firefighter for ten years when we met in EMT Cardiac class in 2000. She was just a kid who wanted to deliver babies some day. Two years later she was sworn is as a Providence Firefighter. A few weeks later she was assigned to Rescue 5. A couple of weeks after that she and JoeEMT who comments here responded to Thayer Street for a man in a car who put a gun to his head and pulled the trigger. I heard the call dispatched and knew the mess they were heading toward, worried how the sight would effect her. She did okay, and continues to thrive in a field where burnout is almost a prerequisite for employment.

She even dispenses some profound advice now and then. I think she’s delivered a baby or two.

Thanks, Teresa. I believe it’s going to be a good day…

Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Heart keeps beating

Michael Morse - Rescuing Providence - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 14:18

 

    My Turn: Michael Morse: A beautiful heart keeps beating    

By Michael Morse

Posted May 26, 2018 at 3:00 PM   

A big part of my life was spent at the head of a stretcher. Those of us who work or worked in EMS call it “the captain’s seat.” There, we direct life-saving efforts, communicate with receiving facilities, breathe for our patients when needed and do our best to keep things calm during transport. Sometimes everything works out; far too often, it does not.

In one case, a young woman fell 40 feet from an escalator, struck her head on a steel beam halfway down and landed on a cement floor. Her fiancé and another couple witnessed the fall, called 911 and waited. I cannot imagine their horror between their frantic call and our arrival, or their sorrow for the rest of their lives. I do not have to imagine my own sadness. I felt it for a decade, and it lingers still.

I was trained as a firefighter, and that training included my EMS certifications. It was rigorous, but far from impossible. I learned how to keep people going, always hoping that the emergency room staff and then surgical teams could finish what we started in the field.

When I encountered this particular patient, I knew that everything that I — or those who followed me — could do would not be enough. The choice to start the life-saving efforts was mine. I made the choice based on the horrified looks on the faces of the survivors, and secretly hated myself for putting the young woman through a violent resuscitation effort. We managed to get a pulse, but I knew she would never regain consciousness.

EMS veterans learn early how to bury the things that need to stay out of sight. We feel things the same way everybody else does, but cannot allow ourselves proper time to heal. A different emergency always comes our way. There is no time to process grief, so we hide it, and move along.

Our strategy works for the people who depend on us. They do not need an emergency responder burdened by a thousand catastrophic events responding to their crisis. They need a person who is fresh, focused and stable.

So I moved on. Days later I read her obituary, and learned that she had a young son who adored her fiancé, and he planned to take care of the child. I can only hope he did.

Ten years passed in a flash. I had made peace with nearly every decision I made during my time at the head of the stretcher. I learned to trust other people in matters of health and well-being.

Eventually, I found myself in a hospital room with my wife who needed medical care. For four days we lingered in the surreal world of tests and results, hospital food, doctors’ rounds, worry, hope and an incredible nursing staff.

 

One of those nurses was particularly helpful, and we struck up a friendship. Eventually professional barriers were crossed and our personal lives were revealed.

We told stories of our families, and how fragile the human body is. We shared our mutual experiences with loss, and how we learned to cope. Family is of utmost importance, we agreed. She told us the story of her father, a great man from Liberia, and how important he is to her family. We learned how he was nearly lost 10 years ago, and how his life was saved by the heart of an unfortunate young girl who donated her organs after an untimely death.

“You may have heard of her,” our nurse said in her beautifully accentuated speech, her words sounding more like a song than sentences. “She fell from an escalator in Providence.”

Michael Morse (mmorsepfd@aol.com), a monthly contributor, is a former captain with the Providence Fire Department and the author of the books “Rescuing Providence” and “Rescue 911.”

   
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

McCarthy Alaska Donated Ambulance Replacing Vandalized Rig

Bill Degnan - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 01:38

The village of McCarthy Alaska's only ambulance was dead. It looks like vandals had grabbed fists full of wiring in the center console -- and yanked, rendering the unit dark, without emergency and interior lighting.

Apparently McCarthy, which has approximately around 30 off-season residents (but hundreds in the Summer) has trained EMS personnel who can treat a patient on scene and transport them to the airport for Airlift to a higher level of care. But, ambulance electrical technicians are hard to find in small-town Alaska.

And, there it sat.

But, Jonathan Dobbs from Wisconsin was visiting last fall from with his girlfrend when he notuced a flyer asking for information about the vandals.

It bothered Dobbs enough to purchase a used rig, pump in some mechanical repairs and drive it to McCarthy from Minnesota.

The town celebrated the event, detailed in a story published in the Alaska Daily News.

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/2018/05/25/mccarthys-only-ambulance-was-...

Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Pages

Subscribe to Volunteer Mobile Emergency Response Unit -- rehabsector.org aggregator - Syndicated Columnists