Syndicated Columnists

The keys to safety on the job after a back injury

Syndicated Columnists - 8 hours 3 min ago
While the saying, “If it’s predictable, it’s preventable,” may be popular, musculoskeletal injuries are a fact of life for EMS providers, especially back injuries. Recovery can be a slow process – even strains or soft-tissue injuries can take 3 to 6 weeks to resolve. Prevention is key, but, in the event you do sustain a back injury, what is the best way to ease your way ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

How to package and present ePCR data to decision makers and officials

Syndicated Columnists - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:30
All-too-often, we look at EMS data from the lens of the number of IV sticks we’ve performed and how many times we’ve administered aspirin. That data is great … but only for the quality assurance and operations staff within your agency. What about involving elected officials – your stakeholders – those who have an influence over your budget" Data in EMS has transformed ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Universal precautions are not just to protect us

Syndicated Columnists - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 16:42
One morning, a Joint Commission site surveyor was on a Med-Surg floor, when a BLS ambulance crew came in to transfer one of the patients to another hospital. The crew came out of the patient’s room with their gloves on and grabbed the hospital’s automatic blood pressure cuff, which was on a rolling cart in the hallway. They used it to take the patient’s blood pressure, and returned ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

4 steps to improving EMS retention with onboarding

Syndicated Columnists - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 16:22
By Joey Araiza, RN, BSN New employee onboarding needs have increased in recent years, as the amount of money and time spent on turnover quickly adds up. Developing an effective strategy requires taking a deeper dive into why increased turnover is occurring, as well as determining what can be done to improve the long-term retention rate of at least two years on the job. Onboarding a new employee can ...
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EMS From a Distance: ALS? BLS? Let skills fall where they may

Syndicated Columnists - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 13:30
“BLS before ALS!” I doubt there’s anyone with more than a few months in EMS who hasn’t heard that cliché. It used to make sense to me. As an EMT, I liked the way it prioritized my low-tech contributions over the meds and monitors of my paramedic partners; and as a new medic, it reminded me not to overlook basic care, no matter how cool my tools were. So why does “BLS ...
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Is Any Day Your EMS Everyday?

EMS Office Hours Podcast - Mon, 06/11/2018 - 09:29

What perception do people have of you? Have you built negative cache by letting things go and become your everyday?

Not sure what I mean? Take a listen to this weeks podcast to see what I am talking about. It is a short episode but I think it will make sense and hopefully change your everyday.

 

The post Is Any Day Your EMS Everyday? appeared first on .

People gathering? Minimal security? You have a soft target and Homeland Security wants planners and responders to know more

Bill Degnan - Sun, 06/10/2018 - 01:02

What can be dine to protect soft targets from terrorists?

Places where people gather freely, like music festivals, houses of worship, or shopping centers, which are easily accessible and often have minimal security, potentially making it easier and cheaper to carry out an attack.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is publicly releasing the DHS Soft Target and Crowded Places Security Plan Overview.

The overview describes how the Department is working to enhance and organize its efforts around the security and resilience of soft targets and crowded places across the United States.

To review the Plan, Resources Guide, and other key information, visit www.dhs.gov/hometownsecurity .

Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Celebration of Life

Bill Degnan - Sat, 06/09/2018 - 12:32

A celebration of the life of Volunteer Emergency Response Unit founder/director Sherry Lassiter was held in Austin this week.

A helmet marked her place at an empty chair. The lemon represents the bitterness of loss, the salt is symbolic of our tears and the glass is inverted because she cannot toast with us.

Image: 
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Get a job!

Michael Morse - Rescuing Providence - Fri, 06/08/2018 - 12:59

By Michael Morse

A part-time job after retirement seemed like a great idea, so I started thinking: Who would benefit most from the vast skill and experience I had to offer?

 

The Hospital?

I was an EMT, after all, and rather adept at handling intoxicated people. Blood doesn’t bother me much, and CPR is second nature. The only problem I might have is I wouldn’t be able to drop the sick and injured off at the hospital and get back to work. That, and I am fairly certain that the emergency medical doctors would not appreciate a retired firefighter used to being in charge trying to take charge of every trauma that rolled through their door.

 

Security?

Speaking of handling intoxicated people, I had a knack for getting them to cooperate, but I’m not sure they give security guards the needed pharmaceuticals to effectively calm those belligerent persons down. As for chasing crooks, I do not have much experience, but I am really, really good at requesting police backup, and I do know how to wear a uniform and can look kind of  imposing when I absolutely have to.

 

FEMA?

Imagine my horror when I realized that every firefighter and medic who has ever retired thinks that Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) wants them! And worse, a lot of those retired firefighters and medics actually took the time and effort to get their degrees, obtain certifications, and pad their resume! I knew that gig was up when the director of my local Emergency Management Agency looked at my resume, raised an eyebrow, opened a file, and showed me what a “real” resume looked like.

I ended up getting a part-time job in a big box hardware store. Little did I know that providing trinkets, gypsum, garden equipment, and lumber to a demanding public would actually be hard! And not only is it physically demanding, but the emotional toll of serving people whose lives are not actually in your hands is exhausting as well. People who are not fighting for their lives have a heck of a lot more gusto when they are not getting exactly what they want when they want it than those who are in and out of consciousness.

I have learned that stress is stress; it doesn’t really matter if lives are at stake or somebody’s gas grill didn’t get assembled in time for the picnic. Our bodies do not understand the severity of a situation when the chemicals responsible for high blood pressure, anxiety, rage, and the swearing impulse are released. All our system knows is that something is amiss, and the fight-or-flight systems go into full throttle.

So, maybe I overreacted when the young guy complained that the box that held his cordless drill was damaged. Perhaps “Quit being a baby and go drill something” wasn’t the textbook response. Maybe I could have been apologetic and offered to get him a new, fresh box for his stupid drill. But sometimes a young guy needs a little incentive from an old firefighter. At least that’s the way I see it. And maybe telling the guys in the warehouse who do nothing but complain that their job “beats doing CPR on babies” wasn’t the most sensitive response, but hey, I’m not there to win any popularity contests, right?

Truth be told, I still get an enormous lift from helping people. The stakes may not be as high, but it still feels great to exceed a person’s expectations. My part-time job is far more challenging than I ever dreamed, and I have a new respect for the people in the retail trenches. The fire service taught me that being competent is of utmost importance, and I try and remember that every time I show up for my shift. I may be a little odd and set in my ways, but I think I’m learning to fit in with the rest of the working world.

http://www.fireengineering.com/articles/fire_life/articles/2018/june/part-time-work-is-not-as-easy-as-it-looks.html

Categories: Syndicated Columnists

5 tips for dispatchers during an act of mass violence

Syndicated Columnists - Fri, 06/08/2018 - 12:24
By Dave Mulholland, Administrator, Arlington County Emergency Communications Center and member of the IPSA’s 911 Telecommunications Committee Each day, 911 telecommunicators handle stressful calls involving law enforcement, fire and medical incidents. Telecommunicators are trained to calm highly distressed callers and gather the appropriate information within structured protocols and processes ...
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Inside EMS: Using CPAP to treat CHF patients

Syndicated Columnists - Thu, 06/07/2018 - 15:43
Download this podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed In this Inside EMS Podcast episode, co-hosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss using CPAP to treat CHF patients. How does it work" What are the benefits and what does the treatment look like" Learn more about the EMS1 Academy and schedule a free demo.
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Engine Co. EMS; the frequent flyer

Michael Morse - Rescuing Providence - Thu, 06/07/2018 - 08:52

“. . . The good news? These patients, more often than not, will survive our interventions–or lack thereof.

The bad news? One of these days, and we never know which one, they will die. Their demise may just happen during one of your calls to assist them. It might happen shortly after you obtained a signed refusal, or a day after you transferred care to the ambulance staff without a proper evaluation or protocol-based treatment. . .”

http://www.fireengineering.com/articles/2018/06/engine-company-ems-frequent-flyers.html

 

 

Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Preparing fire-based EMS for the 'silver tsunami'

Syndicated Columnists - Thu, 06/07/2018 - 08:27
Fire-based EMS systems are experiencing ever-increasing workloads – and this is only the beginning. Drawing from generational demographics, Medicare data and decades of experience managing large EMS systems, Bruce J. Moeller, Ph.D., adjunct professor, University of Florida, will address strategies to manage the silver tsunami in fire-based EMS in a session at Fire-Rescue Med, June 11-13, 2018 ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Q&A: How is the opioid epidemic impacting first responders?

Syndicated Columnists - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 13:00
By Kerri Hatt, EMS1 Senior Editor More Americans now die from opioid overdose than from breast cancer. The epidemic costs more than $500 billion a year and is notably negatively impacting U.S. life expectancy. As opioid overdose death rates rise across the nation, communities are implementing new strategies and collaborations. Widespread dissemination of naloxone – from local pharmacies, to families ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

20 Clues that your Dad (granddad) is a firefighter

Michael Morse - Rescuing Providence - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 14:20

20 CLUES THAT YOUR DAD IS A FIREFIGHTER

You’re a firefighter and let’s face it, you’re a little different from the rest. As the years go by, and the experiences pile up, parts of “the job” begin to define who you are.

It doesn’t happen all at once, and most of the time you can’t even notice it. Your kids, not knowing the pre-firefighter you, simply accept you the way you are.

Ask a kid how he knows his dad is a firefighter and these are some of the things you might hear:

1) HE SAYS WEIRD THINGS LIKE “STAND BY,” OR “ROGER THAT,” INSTEAD OF “WAIT A SEC,” OR “OKAY,” LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE.

2) EVERYTHING IS IN ITS PLACE…OR ELSE!

3) SOMETIMES, HE’S JUST NOT THERE, BUT HE ALWAYS COMES BACK.

4) NO MATTER WHERE HE IS, HE ALWAYS KNOWS HOW TO GET OUT FAST.

5) HE HAS MORE FIRE DEPARTMENT RELATED T-SHIRTS THAN DRESS SHIRTS.

6) HE WEARS RED SUSPENDERS TO HOLD HIS PANTS UP.

7) EVERY TIME THERE’S A FIRE ON TV HE SHOUTS AT THE SCREEN, “THAT’S NOT THE WAY IT IS! YA CAN’T SEE NUTHIN!” EVERY TIME.

8) THERE’S ALWAYS A PICK-UP TRUCK IN THE DRIVEWAY.

9) HE MAY NOT BE A BETTER COOK THAN YOUR MOM, BUT HE MAKES BETTER STUFF!

10) HE TELLS THE BEST STORIES.

11) SOMEHOW, HE’S ALWAYS IN THE THICK OF THINGS.

12) HE BACKS HIS PICK-UP INTO THE GARAGE.

13) SOMETIMES, FOR NO REASON YOU CAN THINK OF, HE WAKES YOU UP AND GIVES YOU A HUG, THEN GOES TO BED WITHOUT SAYING A WORD.

14) YOU CELEBRATE BIRTHDAYS AND HOLIDAYS THE DAY BEFORE, OR AFTER THE ACTUAL DAY.

15) EVERYBODY BORROWS TOOLS FROM YOUR GARAGE.

16) IF HE ISN’T ON HIS FEET, HE’S SLEEPING…AND HE COULD BE SLEEPING ANYWHERE!

17) ALL OF THE SMOKE DETECTORS IN YOUR HOUSE WORK.

18) HIS MOUSTACHE TICKLES.

19) OUT OF ALL OF YOUR FRIEND’S MOMS, YOUR MOM IS THE PRETTIEST.

20) IT’S FATHER’S DAY, AND HE’S NOT HOME!

So there you have it. Twenty ways your kids know that you’re a firefighter. I’m sure there are many more that I’m not even aware of. I kind of hope that some day, when I’m long gone, they’ll get together over a few beverages and tell some stories about their dad, the fireman.

by Michael Morse

Categories: Syndicated Columnists

Paid to vs Have to

EMScapades Cartoon - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:48
Categories: EMS, Syndicated Columnists

EMS is the first line of defense against spread of infectious diseases

Syndicated Columnists - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 14:44
By Keith Collins, alumni, Fire Science Management at American Military University Emergency services personnel play a vital role in maintaining public health. Not only are they the first to provide medical care during an emergency, they are also the first line of defense in identifying and helping prevent the spread of infectious diseases. During epidemics or pandemics such as recent breakouts of Zika ...
Categories: Syndicated Columnists

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