Training

Bullet Rips through Ambulance as Patient Exits Building

Flightsafetynet.com - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 18:02
— An AMR ambulance was about to transport a patient to the hospital when it was struck by at least one bullet.

WASHINGTON — An ambulance was struck by at least one bullet when it was preparing to transport a patient to the hospital.

Washington Post reported that an AMR ambulance was contracted by the D.C. Fire Department to transport a patient to the hospital.

When the patient was being carried out of the building, gunfire broke out and the ambulance was struck at least once, according to fire department spokesperson Vito Maggiolo.

The patient was not harmed in the incident, and it is unclear why the gunfire occurred.

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EMT Saves Road Rage Victim

Flightsafetynet.com - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 10:25
— EMT Bre Jackson just had lunch at Chipotle when she heard gunshots and saw an injured bystander.

HOUSTON — An EMT who had just finished her lunch break saved an injured bystander of a road rage shooting.

EMT Bre Jackson was finishing her lunch break at Chipotle when she heard gunshots and saw an injured bystander.

“I had just grabbed lunch and I heard gunshots as soon as I walked out of the door,” Jackson said. “I immediately went to my car to seek shelter and as I was driving out trying to exit, I see the woman who was injured on her knees and her holding her face and screaming,”

“She was right there on the ground with a few people around her and I could see she had blood all over her clothing,” Jackson added. “So I just parked my car right there in the entrance of the HEB and I ran out to her. She was saying that she was in pain, and I was just telling her you know ‘I understand you’re in pain but try to remain calm. EMS will be here soon.’ Definitely with my training, it’s easier to remain calm in situations, thankfully.”

When Simon described Jackson as a hero, Jackson said she was just doing her job.

“Any EMS, any trained professional would have done the same in the situation. I did nothing special at all,” she said.

According to the victim’s brother, a bullet was lodged in her cheek after grazing her ear and face, but she will recover. The incident is currently under investigation.

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Texas Fire Department Welcomes First Female Firefighter in 141 Years

Flightsafetynet.com - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 06:58
— Denison Fire Rescue crews welcomed Hanna Lindemuth to their team last week.

DENISON, Texas — Denison Fire Rescue crews welcomed Hanna Lindemuth to their team last week as not only one of the department’s newest employees but as the first female firefighter and paramedic in the department’s 141-year history.

After completing EMT and paramedic school, Lindemuth set her sights on fire school. She said she trained with a number of agencies in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex before deciding to look for work in Grayson County, where she remains one of the few female firefighters around.

“We’re happy she’s here and we’re proud of her at the same time,” Assistant Fire Chief Mark Escamilla said. “That’s a big feat that she’s completed. We welcome her with open arms, and she’s definitely going to be an inspiration for us as a community.”

Lindemuth said her road to becoming a paramedic and firefighter first began several years ago when a family tragedy opened her eyes to the value of the work.

“I lost my dad a couple of years ago to a motorcycle accident,” Lindemuth said. “After doing some research, I found that if it wasn’t for the first responders there, I probably wouldn’t have been able to tell him goodbye while his heart was still beating. I ultimately just want to give back and do the same kind of thing for other people.”

“Fire school was grueling, but it was great and I had a lot of fun,” Lindemuth said. “Starting off as a paramedic was great and showed me that I was in the right place and this is what I’m meant to do. I love every second of it.”

As is the case with most new jobs, Lindemuth said she’s had to complete considerable training and that the experience has been a whirlwind of new information. But she said the first few days on the job have been an absolute blast.

“It’s been great,” Lindemuth said. “There’s a lot of training. Basically, I feel like I’ve gone through a crash course in fire school, doing different things every day.”

Lindemuth explained that as she went through training and fire school, she was well aware that she might become the first woman to join the Denison Fire Rescue ranks. And she said that knowledge further motivated her to succeed. Lindemuth said accomplishing her goal was no easy feat, but she didn’t want that to keep other women from pursuing their passions.

“I know a ton of girls who are paramedics and want to get into the fire side of it, but are just too nervous to do it,” Lindemuth said. “I’d just tell them to keep their hose to the ground, start working out, eating right and train as often as they can. It can be done.”

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Graffiti Bridge Honors Flight Medic Who Lost Battle to Cancer

Flightsafetynet.com - Wed, 12/06/2017 - 16:47
— Kara Zaremba worked as a paramedic, a flight medic and a training instructor before losing her battle with ovarian cancer.

PENSACOLA, Fla. — A paramedic’s life was honored with an art display after she lost her battle to cancer.

Escambia County first responders gathered at Graffiti Bridge, which was painted in honor of Kara Zaremba, who was a paramedic, a flight medic and a training instructor before losing her battle with cancer Nov. 27.

“When we come together, when we lose one of our own, it takes a piece out of us all and to see everyone come together like this, it’s normal for us. Kara would have loved this,” Kara’s co-worker, Gigi Owens, said.

A time-lapse video of Graffiti Bridge can be viewed here.

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Medic Born in Ambulance, Delivers Baby in Ambulance, On His Birthday

Flightsafetynet.com - Tue, 12/05/2017 - 16:38
— You can’t make this stuff up.

PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md. — A firefighter-paramedic who was born in the back of an ambulance 42 years ago spent his birthday delivering a baby in the back of an ambulance.

The Week reported that Daniel Helsel, 42, was delivered by a paramedic who was working his first shift while his mother was being transported to the hospital.

“We get on the Beltway and he says you are going to have to pull over because the baby is going to come,” Helsel’s father, Jesse, said.

“As soon as that ambulance comes to a stop – I don’t even think it was fully stopped – the side door opens. A state trooper – our son’s guardian angel – comes in. He doesn’t say a word. He assists with the birth and then he leaves.”

Forty-two years later, the veteran firefighter-paramedic said it was fate that put him in the back of another ambulance on his birthday, and this time he was the one delivering the baby.

“We had a pretty good inkling that it was going to happen soon,” Helsel said. “And we wanted to get her out of the apartment and down the steps before it happened. We got about halfway down the stairs when she stopped and started to push. We had to gently remind her we needed to get her somewhere sanitary. So we were able to get her to the ambulance and onto the stretcher. And we could see the top of the baby’s head. That baby was not going to wait.”

Helsel said the mother and baby are both doing well.

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FDNY EMTs Save Four from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Flightsafetynet.com - Tue, 11/28/2017 - 06:09
Zache Cox and Frantzi Honore responded to a medical call and noticed the carbon monoxide detectors were registering high levels of gas.

NEW YORK — Two FDNY EMTs rescued four people from carbon monoxide poisoning after responding to a medical call

NY Daily News reported that EMTs Zache Cox and Frantzi Honore responded to a home and evacuated four people after they noticed high levels were being registered on the carbon monoxide detectors, according to the FDNY.

A defective boiler was reported as the cause of the gas leak.

“A tragedy and potential disaster was avoided by the quick reactions of these EMS technicians,” Local 2507 president Oren Barzilay said. “We are grateful for the safety equipment and training we receive from the FDNY.”

The fire department posted about the incident on their Facebook page, and users from around the world commented on the save.

“True heroes that should be honored by us all, New York’s Bravest,” one user wrote.

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Texas Honors Injured Paramedic Who Pushed His Partner To Safety

Flightsafetynet.com - Mon, 11/27/2017 - 16:47
Rory Barros was named EMS Person of the Year after pushing his partner out of danger.

WACO, Texas – A Waco paramedic who was severely injured when he was struck by a car at an accident scene has been named the state’s EMS Person of the Year.

East Texas Medical Center paramedic Rory Barros, 31, remains in a Temple critical care unit more than three months after the car struck him and pinned him against the rear of his ambulance.

The award “honors an EMS-certified person who has demonstrated uncommon leadership and courage in providing emergency medical service to the citizens of Texas,” the department says on its website.

Barros has undergone 15 surgeries to repair fractures, extensive leg burns and injuries since the car struck him on Aug. 19 at the accident scene on Loop 340 in Waco.

The driver of the car that struck him, Alec Nava, 36, was arrested and charged with intoxication assault on a public servant and driving with an invalid license, police said.

KWTX reported Barros’ wife, Amy, accepted the award on his behalf.

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Happy Thanksgiving from EMS Flight Safety Network

Flightsafetynet.com - Thu, 11/23/2017 - 05:30
— Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays.

First, because I get to eat great food and fall asleep watching football in a tryptophan induced coma.

And second, because it reminds me to stop grumbling and remember all the amazing things in my life.

EMS Flight Safety Network is full of things to be grateful for.

Here is the EMS Flight Safety Network list of 15 things we humbly ask you consider adding to your own “gratitude list” this year.

1.  Nurses, Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians

Have you ever seen someone save a life? I have. It’s overwhelming. A powerful combination of awe and humility all at the same time.

EMS Flight Safety Network nurses, paramedics and EMTs never describe themselves as heroes or lifesavers.

But I do.

Every nurse and paramedic I ever flew downplayed their lifesaving accomplishments. They routinely referred to lifesaving miracles as “just doing their job.” And they meant it.

I’m grateful for people who make saving lives their work…and do it with humility.

2.  The Utility of Helicopters

Helicopters are great machines.

There’s no other machine on the planet that can bring the emergency room to you.

Equipped properly, helicopters fly instrument approaches to hospital heliports or to the same international airports the airliners fly.

Helicopters save lives . . .

And being part of that lifesaving process is something I’m thankful for. 

 

3.  The Generosity of Volunteers

What are you doing tomorrow at 3 a.m.?

If you’re like me and most others, you’re sleeping.  And you will stay asleep until you wake up for work.

But that’s not what volunteers do.  Volunteers get out of bed anytime someone needs their help.

Volunteers get up anytime police need help clearing an accident scene. Anytime someone needs assistance with crowd control.  Anytime a medical helicopter needs a landing zone.

These folks do a stand-up, professional job. And they do it for free, no questions asked.

I’m grateful for volunteers.

4. Law Enforcement and Police Officers

Nobody gets saved or helped until a scene is safe and secure.

Police (and others) make this happen for EMS Flight Safety Network.

It’s human nature to avoid trouble.

But cops are paid to run toward trouble. To make unsafe places safe for the rest of us – including EMS.

I’m grateful for police and law enforcement and the work they do for all of us.

5.  Night Vision Goggles

Imagine standing in a pitch black room.

No outside light.  No visual references. Complete darkness.

Now imagine turning on a small flashlight. Creating just enough light to see the corners of the room. Creating just enough light to safely walk across the room and out the door.

Can you see (and feel) the difference?

Because the difference between pitch black and just a smidge of light, is huge.

That’s the kind of difference Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) bring to the air medical industry. Huge.

I’m grateful for a tool that keeps air medical crews safer.

6. Dispatchers and Hospital Communication Specialists

Have you ever watched a talented juggler at a circus?

Watched the focus required to juggle three, four, or more balls at the same time?

It’s scary impressive.

And that’s how I think of emergency dispatchers and hospital communication specialists.

Talented jugglers . . .

Except for one very important exception.

Emergency dispatchers and hospital communication specialists aren’t juggling batons or balls. They’re juggling lives.

In some cases, my life. Or the lives of my kids, my wife, my mom . . . or somebody’s mom.

I’m grateful for skillful EMS Flight Safety Network dispatchers and communication specialists.

7.  Aircraft Mechanics

You probably hate it when your car leaves you sit or refuses to start, right?

Or worse yet, unexpectedly just stops running?

In the air medical field, we really really hate it when an aircraft does the same.

Aircraft mechanics keep air medical flying.  Airplanes, and helicopters in particular, are both rugged, yet delicate machines.  Machines that require constant attention. The maintenance is extensive and ever-recurring.

I’m grateful for the aircraft mechanics who keep air medical flying safely.

8.  The EMS Family

Family is a word rarely used to describe a workplace.

Family is special — and work is, well . . . work.

Yet, family is how most in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) describe their co-workers.

Why?

Because EMS is special.  And what makes it special is the people.

I’m grateful for a career with camaraderie, purpose and family-like relationships.

9.  The Karma of Goodwill

Karma is powerful stuff.

The kind of stuff that changes the world.

Do you know what happens when you work with honest, good and caring people?

You guessed it.  You become one of those people.

I see examples of goodwill karma all the time.  I’m grateful for a career with positive karma built right into the job.

10.  The Social Web

I’m grateful for the social nature of the web.

A medium where a one-person-show (or small group) can improve an entire industry.

A place where if you provide value and goodness to people, they will spread your message far and wide. A place where the message is what matters, not who sent it.

A way to change the world.

No special terms or conditions required.

11.  Firefighters and Landing Zone Coordinators

In the United States, fire departments setup 90% of the landing zones for air medical helicopters.

Fire chiefs or their designated representatives act as Landing Zone Officers and communicate directly with pilots and medical crews on medical helicopters.

Firefighters also fire-guard aircraft when medical helicopters land and depart.

And firefighters assist with crowd control and loading of patients aboard medical helicopters. After flying for 20+ years, I’m proud to say firefighters are some of the most generous and caring folks I had the pleasure to work with.

I’m grateful for the professionalism of firefighters and landing zone officers.

 

12.  A Job That Helps People

I’m proud of the work I did as a helicopter pilot.

I’m proud of the work helicopter pilots do for air medical (and others) day-in and day-out.

Pilots don’t save lives like EMS Flight Safety Network nurses, paramedics and EMTs do. But they do help others in their own way.

I’m grateful for the blessings that came with being a helicopter pilot. The people, the places, the lives saved.

I’m grateful for the path flying took me on, and for where it leaves me today.

13.  Connections with Incredible People

Whatever it is you like to blog or write about, there are amazingly cool people who like to blog and write about that, too.

They’re posting wonderful articles and interesting perspectives and asking fascinating questions.

And you can get to know them just by writing about their stuff (with a link, of course), posting reasonably intelligent comments on their blog, and following them on Facebook or Twitter.

I am humbled and amazed by the success of FlightSafetyNet blog —  Over 100,000 unique visitors every month. I am thankful for every single one.

When I got out of the cockpit for the last time, I wasn’t sure what to do.

I identified with being a pilot so strongly I wasn’t sure I could do anything else. I was afraid.

But I have a strong faith, and I knew if I used my skills to help people, God would see me through. And He did.

I’m grateful for all the wonderful FlightSafetyNet blog readers, INSIDER future flight crew coaching students, and company-level EMS social media clients.

It really is one big family.

14.  People Who Support EMS

Supporting a husband, father, wife, mother or daughter who routinely misses family events to help strangers, is hard work.

It takes a special kind of person to support an EMS professional, even when you’re in love with them.

I think we all take our own spouses, significant others and families for granted too often.

Don’t make that mistake this Thanksgiving.

Pull them aside and tell them thanks for putting up with all the “EMS things” you do.

15.  EMS Flight Safety Network

There’s something special about EMS, Fire and Police services looking out for each other.

It makes sense. People identify with it.

I’m humbled and amazed by the success of EMS Flight Safety Network.

Thank you to the 175,000 plus facebook fans and over 38,000+ social media followers & email newsletter subscribers.

Without a network, there is no ‘Net’ to catch us and keep us from becoming ground or air medical statistics.

Thank you for being there.

Wishing you and your loved ones a safe and happy Thanksgiving.

3 Killed In Arkansas Medical Helicopter Crash

Flightsafetynet.com - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 09:12

DEWITT, Ark. — Officials say a medical helicopter has crashed in rural Arkansas, killing all three people on board. 

The aircraft belongs to Pafford Medical Services, based in Hope, Ark. The three people aboard died when the helicopter crashed Sunday night near the town of DeWitt, about 60 miles southeast of Little Rock, officials said.

Dispatchers received a call just before 8 o’clock Sunday night after a resident witnessed the helicopter go down off of Highway 276, near a reservoir. The sheriff says the crash site was difficult to access.

Emergency crews got on scene to find the remains of three crew members and the helicopter engulfed in flames. Sheriff Wright says no patients were on board the Pafford EMS service aircraft.

Pafford released a statement saying, “Pafford is devastated by the the sudden loss of three of our team members.  At this time, we have no words, only prayers for the families and loved ones involved.”

FAA investigators are heading to the crash site, and the National Transportation Safety Board says it’s investigating.

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Video of Angry Driver Screaming at Paramedic Goes Viral

Flightsafetynet.com - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 08:04
The driver called the female paramedic an “f—ing idiot” for not putting her hazard lights on.

CHESHIRE, England — A video of a man screaming obscenities at a paramedic for blocking a street is going viral on social media.

Daily Mail reported that the man is shown arguing with a female paramedic that she should have put signs out as drivers were unaware that the ambulance was in the way.

When the paramedic replies, “Well, open your eyes,” the man’s anger grows and he calls her an “f—ing idiot” for not putting her hazard lights on.

“Go do your f—-ing job properly,” the man adds before driving away.

“How do you find the words to comment on the actions of this individual when crews are treating someone who could have been in a life critical condition?” a North West Ambulance spokesperson said. “This man needs to ask himself how he would feel if it was his grandparent, mom, dad or child that we were treating, would he be happy that we waste precious time searching for a better parking space? Our staff work day and night to save lives, and do not deserve abuse from anyone for something as trivial as blocking a minor road.”

The video has been viewed over a million times on facebook.

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